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THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOLUME \CIX 



The Oldest Continuously -Published College Weeklx in the United States 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE. BRUNSWICK. MAINF, FRIDAY. OCTOBER 3. 1969 



NUMBER 



Pierce and Progress Howell Inaugurated 

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As Tenth President 

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PAGE TWd 



THK BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. OCTOBER 3 



Requirements 



(Continued from page 1) 



V>» 



At the present moment there is 
no committee whose sole function 
b to investigate possibilities of 
coeducation. Director of 
Admissions, Richard Molls, says 
he has not been authorized by the 
President and Governing Boards 
either to admit women to next 
year's freshman class or to 
increase the size of the class 



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beyond the present limit of about 
250. The problem is one of 
finances: feeding, and housing 
additional students. 

Moll has received requests for 
information about Bowdoin from 
leveral women to whom he 
replied with the following form 
letter: 

Thank you for writing to us for 
information about Bowdoin. I am 
sorry to reply that we cannot help 
you with your plans for college at 
present. Women attend Bowdoin 
now only as exchange students in 
a special cooperative program 
with several other colleges, as 
graduate students in mathematics, 
or under exceptional 
circumstances as transfer students 
in the junior year. Arrangements 
for admitting women into other 
programs may follow soon. I shall 
write to you in the course of the 
year if any of these programs for 
women are ready to begin by the 
fan of 1970, 

- Sincerely yours, 

Richard W. Moll 

Director of Admissions 



furthermore, quite a few 
women have come to interviews at 
Maine high schools. However, 
Moll claims, "We're fooling 
ourselves if we don't think there's 
a market for a men's college. The 
statistics of last year prove there 
is. ,r Of all the New England 
schools Bowdoin and Haverford 
had the greatest increase in 
applications, and neither of these 
had plans for coeducation at the 
time. Moll also stressed the 
importance of timing and said we 
must avoid appearing as if we 
were jumping on the bandwagon 
as Trinity and Williams did when 
they announced their decisions to 
go coeducational. 

The greatest likelihood of rapid 
change appears in the aren of 
graduate study. Although the 
Pierce Committee did not deal 
specifically with this question, the 
faculty does have approval to 
submit proposals for graduate 
study to the Boards. At the 
present time, Bowdoin's sole 
venture in graduate education is 
the Math deoartment's Academic 



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1969 

Year Institute for mathematics' between the Board, faculty a rt 

teachers working on graduate students was necessary I n j rP 

degrees. Professor Shipman, weeks the Student Council n 

Chairman of the Committee on begin looking f or stude t 

graduate study, said Bowdoin will interested in serving on th 

be mainly interested in programs governance committee. ■ 

leading to the MA largely oriented The Pierce Committee reDort 

for teachers. They might be opens the possibility of chanei 

conventional MA programs or the present structure of th 

interdisciplinary. college with regard to fraternities* 

At the present time the only coeducation, and graduate studv 
proposals the committee will be I According to Dean Nyhus, the 

investigating are for an increase in report forbids the college from 

the size of the AYI math program destroying or saving the fraternity 

and limited programs in system by fiat. However the 

bio-chemistry and computer college is empowered to establish 

sciences. minimum economic and social 

The main drawback to graduate requirements which all fraternities 

study, of course, is financial. It must meet. The Student Life 

would involve increasing faculty Committee will soon meet to 

size, library facilities, and offering draw up such requirements and 

scholarship aid. Shipman said, the Dean Nyhus expects fraternities 

programs "can't aggravate the will object to establishing a cut 

college's financial problem. This and dried minimum number of 

probably means going more members; however, he said, "We 

slowly than we would otherwise, need an objective criteria to 

We can't move rapidly without prevent houses from undergoing 

indication of outside and months or years of struggle and 

independent support." '♦'« despair which keeps students 

Shipman pointed out that away from more important 

graduate study at Bowdoin would concerns." 

have advantages for Nyhus also suggested that it 

undergraduates by making the may be impossible for the college 

atmosphere here more stimulating to avoid interfering in the 

and necessitating an increase in fraternity situation. For example 

depth and breadth in course should the college decide to build 

offerings. The presence of an attractive independent living 

graduate students might also center it would probably weaken 

stimulate members of the faculty fraternities. He also said, "I can 

in their research, and the college see the potential for unhealthy 

would also be recognizing the polarization if the number of 

need to produce more teachers independents continues to 

particularly at the junior college increase." Nyhus fears that 

level. fraternities may seek to get only 

However, Shipman also pointed members who "fit," thinking they 

out that graduate programs must can keep out the "dissidents" in 

be carefully considered to prevent this way. The college might have 

a redistribution of resources to intervene should this 

which might have harmful results polarization become significant, 

for undergraduates. ftSSSSS^S^-ffl^^ 

The election of Peter Hayes toS . 

the Board of Overseers and the Upper-Classmen are re- 
formation of two permanent 
committees of the boards with 
student and faculty membership 
represents, according to Nyhus, 
the Board's willingness to 
communicate with other members 
of the college community. Over 

the years it has become evident Information Desk on Monday 

that more regular patterns of 

contact and commun ication %%:M%%^^:^^^!%; 



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FRIDAY, OCfOBER 





PAGE THREE 



Representative Performs 
Slight Sleight Of Ideas 

By FRED CUSICK 
speechmaking has Congressman Vander Jagt had a 



Political 
traditionally been one of the least 
effective means of 
communication. Longwindedness, 
bet-hedging, the use of ancient 
cliches and of humorous (but 
often irrelevant) stories, are the 
main characteristics of political 
speech from Demosthenes to 
Nixon. 

In the past few years television 
and modern advertising 
techniques have improved the 
style of the political speech while 
doing nothing about its content. 
The average politician has very 
few ideas to begin with. (Ideas are 
supposed to come from the 
people who write his position 
papers.) In the era of the 
orchestrated press conference the 
privately produced documentary, 
politician becomes a performer 
(Nixon), or the performer 
becomes a politician (Reagan). 
Only the least talented of 
politicians (Agnew) are unable to 
give a good show. The political 
speech becomes merely another 
form of entertainment, to be 
reviewed rather than reported. 

The performance of 
Congressman Guy Vander Jagt 
(R., Mich.) last Friday night at the 
Terrace Under was a flop. The 
Congressman's failure to entertain 
his audience can be traced directly 
to his stubborness in trying to put 
a few ideas into what was 
otherwise a very amusing speech 
about "Student Dissent." 



few simple points to make about 
student violence on campus. 
Briefly they are: 

1. That the majority of students 
are opposed to the war in 
Vietnam, ABM, the retention of 
ROTC, and large defense spending 
on campus. 

2. That, when Vietnam ends, 
the students will continue to 
protest the injustices within our 
society. 

3. That the Federal government 
would be playing into the hands 
of the extreme militants by a 
crackdown on the universities. 

4. That students can achieve 
something within the system. Bills 
on tax reform, election reform, 
and draft reform are waiting in 
Congress for "Student Power" 
and "Youth Power" to push them 
through. 

The interjection of these ideas, 
however, spoiled Vander Jagt's 
performance. He wasted nearly 
half of his speech in talk about 
student dissent. 

While the congressman's overall 
performance was poor there were 
one or two high spots. He began, 
for instance, by introducing his 
wife, "my No. 1 vote getter", 
"the reason I was elected". By the 
time he had finished introducing 
his wife, "who, by the way, 
almost married a Bowdoin man", 
the audience was obviously 

(Continued on Page 7) 



Bowdoin Builds Bridge Over Ages, 
Youngster Takes Overseers Seat 



PIRATES OF PENZANCE? Not quite. President "Jolly" Roger Howell 
throws out the first arrow in last may's World Arrow-Throwing 
Championship held on the Bowdoin campus. Bowdoin *s new president 
also played rugby at Oxford, as well as football during his 
undergraduate years. 



Peter F. Hayes, a 22-year-old 
Bowdoin College alumnus now 
studying in England on a post- 
graduate scholarship, was elected 
to the College's Board of Overseers 
this summer. He is the youngest 
man named to Bowdoin's 
Governing Boards in the history 
of Maine's oldest institution of 
learning. 

Also elected to life terms on 
Bowdoin's Board of Overseers 
were two other Bowdoin 
graduates, James M. Fawcett, III, 
President of Fawcett Enterprises, 
Inc., of New York City; and Dr. 
Leonard W. Cronkhite, Jr., 
General Director of the Children's 
Hospital Medical Center in 
Boston. 

The Governing Boards of 
Bowdoin include the 13-member 
Board of Trustees and the 
45-member Board of Overseers. 
All actions are initiated by the 
Trustees but each vote must have 
the concurrence of the Overseers. 

Elected to a two-year term as 
the new President of the Board of 
Overseers was Atty. Louis 
Bernstein '22, who has been Vice 
President since 1965. 

To succeed Mr. Bernstein as 
Vice President, the Overseers, 
elected William P. Drake '36, 
Chairman and Chief Executive 
Officer of Pennwalt Corp., 
Philadelphia, Pa. Mr. Drake, is a 
member of Psi Upsilon Fraternity. 
He was awarded an honorary 



degree by Bowdoin in 1962. 
Reelected Secretary of the Board 
of Overseers was Thomas P. Riley. 
'39- 

Hayes, a member of the Class of 
1968, compiled a distinguished 
undergraduate record and served 
as President of the Bowdoin 
Student Council. He was 
graduated magna cum laude and 
was awarded Highest Honors in 
Government, his major field. 
Hayes won numerous prizes and 
awards, including the Goodwin 
Commencement Prize as the 
author of the best student speech 
delivered at Commencement 
exercises last June. 

One of Hayes' awards was a 
Keasbey Memorial Foundation 
Scholarship for post-graduate 
study in England. The Keasbey" 
Scholarships are based on 
standards much the same as those 
for Rhodes Scholars. Hayes began 
his studies at Balliol College of 
Oxford University last fall after 
serving during the summer as an 
Assistant to the Director of 
Admissions at Bowdoin. 

Hayes, was President of the 
Bowdoin chapter of Beta Theta Pi 
Fraternity and was an Alfred P. 
Sloan Scholar at Bowdoin. A 
Dean's List student, he was 
elected' to Phi Beta Kappa, 
national honorary fraternity for 
the recognition and promotion of 
scholarship. He was one of two 
Bowdoin undergraduates chosen 



Sixty Fratless Freshman 



Independents Expand 



i 



The Fraternity rush for the 
1969-70 academic year had been 
billed as crucial for the system 
and the individual houses, and it 
was. The report of the Pierce 
Committee put pressure upon 
some houses to upgrade their 
facilities and upon others to 
maintain what existed. A good 
******* *** *** * *** ** 

Tryouts Set 

Try outs for the fall musical 
"FIORELLO" will be held on 
Sunday, Oct. 5, and Monday, 
Oct. 6, from 7:30 — 10:00 p.m. at 
Pickard Theatre. Anyone 
interested in working on the show 
in any capacity is asked to drop 
by. 
**** ** ******* *** * ** 



Frosh Bring Better Credentials. 
Special Talents To Bowdoin 



By JOHN WEISS 



Most Seniors will admit that Bowdoin has 
changed considerably in the past three years. The 
Governing Boards, the Trustees, Faculty, 
Administration, and Student Council have 
introduced a series of innovations which are 
causing changes in all phases of life at Bowdoin. 

Many of these changes are obvious: deletion of 
the science requirement, the new social code, the 
Coleman farm experiment, the Afro-American 
program. However, some changes in administrative 
policy are manifesting themselves in more subtle 
ways. Some of the more important policy changes 
are in admissions. In what manner have admissions 
changed? How have these policies affected the 
quality of the incoming student? And, finally, how 
will the new admissions policy change the social 
and intellectual environment at Bowdoin? 

Richard Moll, Director of Admissions, 
summarized the new policy: "We give fewer points 
to candidates who hold elective office such as 
aenior class president, and more points to the 
fellow with an accomplished talent, be it musical, 
dramatic, athletic, or strictly academic." Classes, 
Moll lays, should be well-rounded by different 
types of individuals rather than a class of 
well-rounded individuals. 

A comparison of the classes of 1970 and 1973 
illustrates Moll's point. Geographic distribution 
has been broadened in the new class, as nearly 20 
percent more of the class come from outside New 



England. Admissions' search for "accomplished 
talent" also appears successful, according to Moll. 
The class of 1970 had 35 editors while 1973's class 
has 65. Eighty-eight members of the incoming 
freshman class were sports captains; in 1970, only 
51 led athletic teams. 

In the quest for applicants with diverse talents 
and interests the admissions office has been careful 
not to lose sight of the need for academic 
excellence. The present class has the highest 
average Scholastic Aptitude Test in recent years. 
Members of the 1973 class ranked higher in their 
secondary classes than 1970 did. 

The preference for individuals highly talented in 
their own fields has resulted in a diversified, 
academically excellent class. 

Statistically, the entering class looks superior. 
But are there drawbacks to the policy of 
significantly reducing the number of well-rounded 
students on campus? Perhaps the fraternities 
would argue that there are. Over seventy freshmen 
chose to go independent this year. If this trend 
accelerates or continues, several houses would fold 
within the next few years. Since it can be assumed 
that Mr. Moll won't choose to discontinue a 
successful policy of admission, it is left up to the 
fraternities to adjust to the rapidly changing 
circumstances; if they fail to adjust to the 
situation, then certainly their days are numbered. 



numerical rush seemed to be the 
only way to guarantee the 
perpetuation of a house. Yet from 
the beginning the "individuality" 
of members of the Freshman class 
seemed to limit the number of 
rushees available to the houses. 

Things were tense as the houses 
organized for battle. A new set of 

"dirty rush" guidelines, handed 
down by the Student Council 
Rushing Committee had been in 
effect during the summer and 
they continued into dorm rush. 
As of this week there have been 
no formal complaints made of 
"dirty rush" practices. Most 
houses seemed pleased with the 
bid and drop times and no major 
revision for next year seems 
likely. 

Carrying off the numerical 
honors were Beta and DEKE 
respectively who were the only 
houses to close with a full quota 
of 26 men. Both had things sewn 
up within minutes after the 7:00 
drop hour. Other houses enjoyed 
varying degrees of success. The 
count was as follows: BETA — 26 
+ 2 social; DEKE 26+1 social; 
PSI U 24;ARU 23 + 2 social; A D 
19; CHI PSI 17; SIGMA NU 12 + 
1 social; ALPHA KAPPA SIGMA 
11; DELTA SIGMA 10; T D 8; 
ZETE 7. 

Because of the large number of 
freshmen who remained in the 
independent category, 
approximately 60, the student 
council extended the official rush 
period to include the entire year. 

The result of this year's rush 
was obviously to strengthen some 
houses and weaken others. If the 
loosers in this year's race suffer 
another drought next year they 
almost certainly will pass away. 
The system is shaping up to be 
one of six to eight strong houses 
and a new type of independent 
living style. If this be the case, 
then the Pierce Committee was 
anticipating the trend when they 
reported, "We submit that the 
students themselves will, and 
should, ultimately determine the 
evolution of the system within the 
framework of the College. " 



to participate in a unique summer 
internship program at the Harvard 
Business School in the summer of 
1967 and was one of ten Bowdoin 
seniors appointed Undergraduate 
Research Fellow. At 
Commencement he won the 
Lucien Howe Prize as a senior 
who "has shown the highest 
qualities of conduct and 
character." 

Mr. Fawcett, a native of 
Brooklyn, N. Y., was nominated 
to be an Overseer in nationwide 
balloting by Bowdoin alumni. A 
Director of the Bowdoin Alumni 
Fund, he has been Vice President 
of the Bowdoin Club of Long 
Island and a Vice President of the 
Bowdoin Club of New York. He is 
Vice President of the • Class of 
1958 and, as Class Agent, he 
received for his class an 
unprecedented three awards for 
outstanding participation in 
Bowdoin's 1967-68 Alumni Fund. 
Mr. Fawcett, a member of Delta 
Sigma Fraternity, has been a 
Director; of Cybernetic 
Applications, Inc., and Delray 
Dunes, Inc. Among his other posts 
have been Secretary and Director 
of "Retention Communications 
Systems, Inc., and Vice "President 
and Director of Mark III Charter 
Corp. and Channel Construction, 
Inc. 
"Dr. Cronkhite, a native of 
Newton, Mass., is a cum laude 
member of the Class of 1941 and 
a member of Chi Psi Fraternity. 
He is a Major General in the U.S. 
Army Reserve, and Commanding 
General N of the Army Reserve 
Command (ARCOM) in Boston. 
He holds the Legion of Merit and 
Army Commendation Medal. 

Dr. Cronkhite is a Lecturer in 
Preventive Medicine at Harvard 
Medical School, a Medical 
Consultant for the Massachusetts 
General Hospital and Consultant 
in Maternal and Child Health at 
the Boston Hospital for Women. 
He is Chairman of the Governor's 
Medical Assistance Advisory 
Council and a member of the 
Advisory Committee on Research 
of the_Costs of Medical Care for 
the U.S. Department of Health 
Education and Welfare (HEW). 
President of Baytron, Inc., 
Medford, Mass., a manufacturer of 
radar components, he is also Vice 
President of Cloutman and 
Company, Inc., designers and 
builders of yachts. 

Bowdoin s Sons 
Seek Danforths 

Students interested in college 
teaching as a career are eligible to 
apply for graduate scholarships 
awarded by the Danforth 
Foundation of St. Louis, Mo. 
Professor William D. Geoghegan. 
Chairman of the Bowdoin 
Department of Tteligion and the 
Foundation's Representative on 
campus, said undergraduates who 
want information about the 
Fellowships should (see him well 
before the Oct. 8 Bowdoin 
deadline date for nominations. 

The -Fellowships are open to 
men and women who are seniors 
or recent graduates of accredited 
colleges in the United States, who 
have serious interest in college 
teaching as a career, and who plan 
to study for a Ph.D. or other 
terminal degree in a field common 
to the undergraduate college. 
Applicants may be single or 
married, must be less than thirty 
years of age, and may not have 
undertaken any graduate or 
professional study beyond the 
baccalaureate. 

Danforth Graduate Fellows are 
eligible for four years of financial 
assistance, with a maximum 
annual living stipend of $2400 for 
single Fellows and $2950 for 
married Fellows, plus tuition and 
. fees. Dependency allowances are ' 
available. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, 



r 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Vote No 



Volume XCIX 



Friday, October S, 1969 



Number 1 



Pierce and Progress 

i Continnurl from nnop 1 \ 

implicit assumption is that those people who are not completely 
committed to fraternity life are anti-social and dead weight in the 
house, but often those people who are the most anxious to belong to a 
house are also those who do it the most harm. It is at least as likely that 
a strengthening of fraternities might result in increased tension and 
polarization of the campus. 

The only justification of a fraternity is as a gathering place for people 
who share interests and have real friendship for one another (i.e. a 
brotherhood). The report rejects this idea by misinterpreting it to. 
sound as if it would promote provincialism. 

We do not suggest the committee should have ordered the abolition 
of fraternities and the construction of independent living centers. But 
we do think that they should have found the real problem: the fact that 
the college has paid no attention to the social welfare of students until 
recently. They might then have been able to wrestle with the difficulty 
of salvaging small group living without maintaining the harms of 
fraternities. 

The chapter on Coeducation is also weak, for again the committee let 
its prejucices interfere with its search for truth. In this case, however, 
they did decide in favor of what we believe to be the right course. The 
two main defects of this section are the silliness of its tone and its 
failure to give any penetrating analysis of the arguments for and against 
coeducation. We wondered whether the committee was merely 
rationalizing its prejudice for coeducation or was cleverly 
demonstrating the great need for coeducation by revealing its own 
ignorance about women. 

The report heralds the news that "Women are now regarded as men's 
equals in their capacity for intellectual achievement in fields earlier 
thought of as men's exclusive preserve", that "women today are well 
equipped to hold their own intellectually with men", and that 
coeducation is not a "passing fad". Those of us who attended 
coeducational high schools probably wondered what the report meant 
by "the stimulus of the differing expressions of both male and female 
viewpoint in the classroom." But this was only one occurrence of the 
idea of some unique female psyche. We do not doubt that coeducation 
would improve Bowdoin's social life, but that "Women have an 
inherent ability to 'break the ice'" in faculty-student relations seems a 
questionable bit of superstition. Finally, if the Boards have a serious 
interest in expanding the course offerings in the humanities and fine 
arts, it would be much less expensive to admit students with an interest 
in a liberal education. 

Also, the arguments against coeducation are much stronger than the 
report suggests. First, it is the case that women often drop their fields 
after marriage. Secondly, there may be more evidence than the 
committee admits that there is still a strong demand for all men 
schools. Thirdly, a good argument can be made for considering the 
college years a time for young people to retreat from the world to 
discover themselves and learn about the world without having it forced 
upon them. Never again will they get a chance to observe events with as 
much detachment, (Unless, of course, they are elected to the Governing 
Boards of a college.) 

Ultimately, ,we find none of these objections convincing, but others 
might. Consideration of them could have opened debate on the aims of 
the college, and the means it should employ, a debate which is essential 
at this time. 

Some people may wonder why we have bothered to kick a gift horse 
in the mouth. It is because we believe that any group which responds to 
problems the way the Pierce Committee and the Governing Boards 
have, looses all claim to having a serious concern for the issues. We hope 
that serious debate and examination will now take place. 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP. MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION 



(Art of October 23. 1*C2; Section 4369. 
Title 39, United SUtea Code) 

1. Date of Fllimr: September 29. I»6!i. 

2. Title of Publication: Bowdoin 
Orient. 

3. Frequency of Issue: Weekly on 
Friday when classes are in session at 
Bowdoin College. 

4. Location of known office of pub- 
lication: Moulton Union. Bowdoin Col- 
lege. Brunswick, Maine 04011. 

5. Location of the headquarters or 
general business office of the publish- 
ers: Moulton Union, Bowdoin College. 
Brunswick, Maine 04011. 

6. Names and addresses of publisher, 
editor, and managing 1 editor: Publisher, 
The Bowdoin Publishing Company. Bow- 
doin College, Brunswick. Maine 04011 : 
editor, Alan Kolod, Senior Center, Bow- 
doin College. Brunswick, Maine 04011: 
managing editor, Sam Hastings. Senior 
Center, Bowdoin College, Brunswick. 
Main? 04011. 

7. OWNER (If owned by a corpora- 
tion, its name and address must be 



stated mid also' immediately thereunder 
the mimex itnd mldresses of stockholders 
owning or holding 1 |ierrent or more 
of tot nl amount of stock. If not owned 
by n cor imrHtion, the mimes uml ad- 
drtssis of the individual owners must 
be given. If owned by n partnership or 
other unincor|M>rnted firm, its name and 
address. Ms well as that of each indi- 
vidual must be given) : The llowdoin 
Publishing Co.. Moulton Union, Bow- 
doin College. Brunswirk. Maine 04011. 

N. Known landholders, mortgagees, 
and other security holders owning or 
holding I iiercent or more of total 
amount of bonds, mortgages or other 
securiti s: NONE. 

9. For completion by nonprofit organi- 
zations authorized to mail at siierial 
rates (Section 132.122. Postal Man- 
nual): The put i>ose. function, and non- 
profit status of this organization and 
the exempt status for Federal income 
tax purposes Have not changed dur- 
ing preceding 12 months. 



Average No. Copies 

Each Issue 
During Preceding 
12 Months 

2000 



Single 

Issue Nearest 

To Filing Date 

2000 



10 Extent and Nature of Circulation 

A. Total No. Copies Printed (Net Prats Run) 

B. Paid Circulation 

1. Sales through dealers and carriers, street 
vendors and counter tales 

2. Mail Subscriptions 490 469 

C. Total Paid Circulation 490 469 

D. Free Distribution (including samples) by Mail.. 

Carrier or Other Means 1200 1200 

E. Total Distribution (Sum ot C and D) 16".M> l««9 

F. Office Use, Left-Over. Unaccounted, 

'Spoiled After Printing 310 331 

G. Total (Sum of E 41 F — should equal net press 

run thown in A) 2000 2000 

I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. 

RORERT ARMSTRONG 



If the tfnited States government were to hold a 
"referendum on the Vietnam War in which the 
youth of the nation were allowed to vote, there is 
little doubt that the young people would vote the 
war out of existence. For both legal and political 
reasons such a referendum can and will not be 
held. Yet if the youth of our nation are resolute 
there seems to be a way for them to htold their 
own referendum using a system that has been set 
up by the government. Each time a SS Form 1 50 
is filed it beeomes a statistic within the selective 
service system. Should a million young people file 
SS Form 150, it would be a mandate from the 
youth that the war be ended at once. The filing of 
the form is not an act of civil disobedience but is a 
right under the SS system. Since in all but a few 
cases the board clerk will routinely deny the CO 
application, the referendum will add little burden 
to the members of the nation's draft boards. It will 
allow each youth to vote soon after his 18th 
birthday. Copies of the form could be printed in 
the newspapers to make sure that the 
administration id not find itself short of supplies 
and funds to print new copies of SS Form 1 50. 

I encourage all of this nation's youth to file a SS 
Form 150 during the month of December. Further 
I request those that share my concern in this 
matter to publicize this youthful referendum. 

Ralph Eno 

Chairman, Peace and Service Committee 

Wilton, Conn. Meeting 

Religious Society of Friends 



Save Our Youth 

Dear Friend: 

Please do not treat this letter lightly, as we, the 
writers, most certainly DO NOT. 

I am confident that both you and I fully realize 
what this present "jet age" has contributed to the 
moral decay of increasing numbers of our youth, 
ie: movies, television, music and fashions, drugs. 
Indications all point to a very possible 20th 
Century "SODOM AND GOMORRAH". WE 

MUST NEVER PERMIT THIS TO' HAPPEN 

NEVER .... NEVER! What can be done?????? 
To us, just everyday working people, here in 
Corning, N. Y., there is only one answer . . . 
FIGHT .... FIGHT, and keep FIGHTING, until 
this evil is destroyed. From the beginning, we have 
advocated sex education in the schools, as we feel, 




I 



For Letters To The Editor, Writ 
EDITOR 
THE ORIENT 
Moulton Union 
t Campus 



e: 



"tell it like it is", so that when confronted with 
various situations, one knows how to react. In our 
small way, we have decided to do the following 
(which I am sure will be laughed at, and ridiculed 
by many). However, we are dedicated and 
determined, and perhaps, being Godfearing people 
that you are, as are we, you will help us. 

As an incentive to our youth, as something to be 
proud of, and look up to, we have founded a "NO 
SEX BEFORE MARRIAGE" club, and furnishing 
for the small sum of $3.00 a lovely certificate 8 
by 22 and suitable for - framing, showing 
membership in this club, with his or her name or 
the name of a group, organization, etc., inscribed 
thereon, in addition to buttons and wallet size 
cards. THIS IS AN EXCLUSIVE COLLEGE 
ORGANIZATION. We are parents outselves, a,nd 
we regret the charge of $3.00, yet this is necessary 
to cover the costs of printing and handling, and 
helps to partially finance our planned college 
lecture tours of our President and Vice President. 
We desire nothing for ourselves, save the 
realization that perhaps our small effort will, in 
some way, help guide our youth on the only true 

path to happiness and salvation the path of 

righteousness. Our President has appeared on 
television in order to further our goal, and already, 
at this time, we can boast numerous members, 
both male and female, from many colleges 
throughout the country. As I stated above, these 
certificates, we think, are Arery lovely, and in 
addition to greatly aiding youth, you might, as a 
special project, order them in volume, and 
distribute them for whatever amount you would 
decide upon, giving the proceeds to your favorite 
charity. Please let us hear from you. (You may 
send cash or money order). 

"Yours for a Stronger Youth" 

NSBM Club 

336Vi Park Avenue 

Corning, NY. 14830 



Council Tables Anti-War Motion 
Raises Issue of Proper Function 



Bowdoin College, like the rest 
of the country, has felt the effects 
of the Vietnam war. Nearly all of 
the students would be liable to 
the draft and the war if they left 
college. Feelings of dissent, or 
"patriotism", prompted by the 
war, have driven a small handful 
to the philosophy of SDS, and 
another, equally small handful to 
the military gymnastics of the 
Bowdoin Rangers. A fear of 
campus violence, the offspring of 
the war, triggered the . secret 
injunction fiasco of last spring. 
Violence, fear, the draft, SDS, the 
Bowdoin Rangers, are all the 
results of the war and because of 
the war they have found their 
places at Bowdoin. 

The Student Council, however, 
has only recently taken up the 
issue of Vietnam. At its meeting 
on September 22 the Council 
passed a resolution urging each 
student to reappraise his feelings 
about the war on Vietnam 
Moratorium Day, Oct. 15. Last 
Monday George Issacson, vice 
president of Council introduced a 
resolution calling for the members 
to take on Vietnam: 

The student Council of Bowdoin 
College opposes the United States 
involvement in the Vietnam war on the 
grounds that its participation is 
detrimental to the people of South 
Vietnam, to peace in Southeast Asia 
and to the resolution of America's 
dpmestic problems. We condemn the 
war as immoral and support the 
immediate withdrawal of all United 
States troops from South Vietnam as 
the quickest and most equitable means 
of ending the war and stopping the 
senseless waste of American and 
Vietnamese life. 

Following the introduction of 
the resolution there was some 
debate over whether the Council 
had a right to express an opinion 
on political matters. It was 



By FRED CUSICK 

suggested that Issacson should 
explain why he thought the 
Council should speak out on the, 
war. The following is his 
explanation: 

"The question of whether the 
Council is willing to act on such a 
resolution is an important one 
concerning the Student Council's 
self image and its interpretation of 
its responsibilities to the student 
body. There are those who believe 
that the Council should not 
involve itself in partisan issues of 
the larger variety. They view the 
Student Council as a solely 
administrative unit concerned 
with the internal. operations of the 
college. This is one interpretation 
of the Council's function, but I do 
not accept it. Institutions should 
not remain aloof or passive to the 
forces which effect them. The war 
in Vietnam has touched the 
Bowdoin community directly. It 
effects our moral consciences, our 
future, and the existence of our 
jives and of our college. Certainly 
it effects us as a community as 



much as social rules and parking 
regulations. The Student Council 
should be both a form for 
discussion and a means of student 
expression. If student opinion is 
to be at all effective in ending the 
war, it must be representative and 
capable of clear expression. The 
Student Council as the legitimate 
representative organization of the 
student organization can serve 
these ends. If there are differences 
in attitudes toward the war it is 
proper that they be discussed and 
debated before the Council and 
the resolution be defeated or 
accepted on its merits. It would 
be wrong for the Council to 
defeat this motion because of a 
fear of controversy, a. limitation 
of its own function, and a 
hesitance to act outside of 
unanimity. 

Issacson's resolution was tabled 
until next Monday night. Student 
Council meetings-are opened to all 
studjents, who are welcome to 
participate in the discussion. 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Member of the United States Student Press Association 



Editor 
Alan Kolod 



Msnsging Editor 
Bob Naah 

News Editor 
Jay Sweet 

Sports Editor 
Mtrtin Friedlander 



Business Manager 
Bob Armstrong 

Advertising Manager 
Peter Mejttrirk 

Office Manager 
Fred Langtrman 



V EDITORIAL BOARD 

Altn holod. Sam Hatting*. Jay Sweet, Martin Friedlander. Bob Nash. John Weiss. 
Paul Barton. Paul Batista. 

THE BOWDOIN PI BUSHING COMPANY 
A. P. Dtggetl. J. p. Granger. Alan Kolod. Bob Armstrong. 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3. 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



New Faculty Includes 
Counsellor, Physician 



i 



PAGE FIVE 



Blanket Tax Allocations Listed 



At the beginning of the 1969-70 
academic year, Bowdoin 
welcomed 26 new faculty and 
staff members. They include a 
noted artist, and a former 
professional squash champion. 
The college has also appointed an 
Associate College Physician and a 
Director of Counseling. 

The 26 new staff members are: 

DR. JOHN B. ANDERSON, 
Associate College Physician. Dr. 
Anderson has been engaged -in 
general practice with the 
Merrymeeting Mecical Group in 
Brunswick. He received his A.B. at 
Bowdoin with Honors in Biology 
and was awarded his M.D. degree 
at the Tufts University School of • 
Medicine. 

DR. MELVIN BAND, Assistant 
Professor of Mathematics. Dr. 
Band has been a Post-Doctoral 
Fellow at the University of 
Manitoba. He holds a B.Sc. degree 
with honors in Mathematics and 
an M.Sc. degree from McGill 
University, and a Ph.D. from 
M.I.T. He has held a Canadian 
National Research Council Award. 

JAMES E. BLAND, Assistant 
Professor of History. Professor 
Bland has been a Teaching Fellow 
in History at Harvard, where he 
received his A.B- degree magna 
cum laude. He is currently a 
candidate for his Ph.D. degree at 
Harvard. 

DR. THOMAS L. BOHAN, 
Assistant Professor of Physics. Dr. 
Bohan has been a Research 
Associate in Physics at the 
University of Illinois, where he 
received his M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees. He received his B.S. 
degree from the University of 
Chicago. Dr. Bohan has studied at 
the University of Ghent, Belgium,' 
under a National Science 
Foundation grant. 

DR. DONALD E. COWING, 
College Counselor and Director of 
Counseling. Dr. Cowing has been a 
member of the faculty of the 
Graduate School of Education at 
Rutgers University. He was 
awarded B.S., A.M. and Ed.D. 
degrees at Wayne State University, 
where he was a Doctoral Fellow in 
Special Education. 

MRS. GLORIA S. DUCLOS, 
Visiting Assistant Professor of 
Classics for the second semester. 
Mrs. Duclos is a Phi Beta Kappa 
and magna cum laude graduate of 

Moratorium Set 



Radcliffe, where she also received 
an M.A. degree. She holds B.A. 
and M.A. degrees from Oxford 
University and has been a member 
of the faculty of Wellesley College 
and the University of Maine. ' 

IRVING D. FISHER, Visiting 
Assistant Professor of 
Government. Professor Fisher, a 
former member of the Bowdoin 
faculty and a member of the 
faculty of the University of 
Maine, Portland, received his A.B. 
degree at the University of 
Connecticut and holds an A.M. 
degree from Columbia, where he 
is a Ph.D. degree candidate. 

DR. DAVID N. HOLMES, JR., 
Assistant Professor of Economics. 
Dr. Holmes has held a National 
Defense Education Ac,t 
Fellowship at the University of 
California. He holds an A.B. 
degree from )Harvard, and A.M. 
and Ph.DL degrees from U.C.L.A., 
where he has been a Research 
Fellow at the Latin American 
Center. 

DR. A. 
Instructor 
received 



IKELER, 
Dr. Ikeler 
degree at 



ABBOTT 
in English, 
his A.B. 
Harvard, his A.M. degree at the 
University of Pittsburgh, Aid his 
Ph.D. degree at King's College of 
the University of London. He has 
been a Teaching Fellow at the 
University of Pittsburgh. 

DR. KENNETH F. IRELAND, 
Visiting Assistant Professor of 
Mathematics. An Assistant 
Professor at Brown University, Dr. 
Ireland is a Phi Beta Kappa 
graduate of The Johns Hopkins 
University, where he was awarded 
his Ph.D. degree. He has been a 
Visiting Member of the Institute 
for Advanced Study, Princeton, 
N.J. 

JOSEPH JEFFERSON, Vice 
President for Development. Mr. 
Jefferson has been Executive 
Director of the American Council 
for (Emigres in the Professions, 
Inc. He received his A.B. from 
Columbia College and was the 
first Executive Secretary of the 
National Association of College 
Admissions Counselors. He has 
also held executive positions at 
M.I.T. and Columbia. 

MORTIMER F. LAPOINTE, 
Coach of Lacross. Mr. LaPointe 
has been a science teacher and 
coach at the Lenox School, 
Lenox, Mass. He holds a B.S. 
degree from Trinity and was 
awarded a Master of Arts in 
Liberal Studies degree at 
Wesleyan, where he studied under 



- 


Appropriated 


• Expended 


Requested 


Allocated 


* - 


1968-69 


1968-69 


1969-70 


1969-70<" 


- AIESEC 


276 


253. 13 


376 


276 


Band 


840 


848.83 


1,742 


1,218.50 


BUCRO 


3,700 


1,501.82 


1,600 


950 


Chess Club 


45 


- 


• ** 


- 


Outing Club 


990 


976.32 


3,013 


2,015* 


Int'l Club 


660t ... • 


850 


1,900 


1,250* 


Political Forum 


1,960 


1,525.08 


3,140 


1,490 


Interfaith Coun. 


1,568 


1,609.68 


6,303 


2,578 


Cheerleaders 


200 


185.43 


232 


232 


Student Coun. 


1,405 


(318.90) 


1,980 


1,280 


WBOR v 


3,050+ 


3,150.87 


3,725 


3,100* 


Quill _J~^S 


2,200 


1,937.15 


2,000 


1,800 


Orient 


5,250 


5,250 


7,575 


6,450 


Chapel-Forum 


720 


238.26 


- 


- 


Students Arts Com. 


550 


516.77 . 


950 


600 


Student Union Com. 


7,975 


5,125.77 


10,475 


8,800* 


Camera Club 


600 


, 597.95 


600 


400 


Social Service 


165 


87.44 


200 


165 


Afro Am. Society 


2,550 


2,865.52 


6,420 


3,800 


Franco Am. Club . 


. 




900 


250 


Bugle 


5,000 


3,304.86 


5,100 


5,200* 




40,029 


30,598.98 


55,000 


41,678 



J 



No Expansion Plans 



Union Handles Independent Increase 



By JAY SWEET 



For October 15 <Co,rti ° ued °° "* 6) 



The trend toward independence continued this 
year, as over a quarter of the freshman class chose 
to board at the Union. At the present level of 175 
Union-borders, there is little or no significant 
change in dining conditions there as compared to 
the end of last year, when 120 men were eating at 
the Union. In an interview Tuesday, Ron Crowe, 
director of the Central Dining Service, explained 
the present situation, and speculated on the 
future. 

First, the present number of independents will 
not overtax Union facilities. The present kitchen is 
designed to serve as many as 400. Although the 
dining rooms are now filled at peak meal hours, 
they are not crowded. The only curtailment in 
Union service caused by physical limitations will 
be a cutting back in banquet services as compared 
to previous years. 

Second, despite the increase in numbers, the 
quality of independent dining will increase only 
slightly. Despite traditional fraternity economics, 
which dictate a linear relationship between the 
number of boarders and food quality, the dramatic 
increase in the independent ranks cannot be 
translated directly into food quality. A ratio of 
total available board money to labor, costs 
determines the amount of money which may be 



spent on food. This ratio operates to the 
maximum benefit of the boarders at levels of 
between fifty and one hundred. Above that 
number, new labor must be hired, and the next 
level of maximum efficiency occurs at about five 
hundred. 

Crowe also pointed out that comparisons 
between Senior Center dining and Union dining 
are misleading. The Senior Center staff' is 
responsible solely for three meals a day, whereas 
the Union must maintain normal service in 
addition to feeding the independents. In addition, 
because of the cohesive nature of the Senior Class, 
relatively low cost meals can be served to provide^ 
surplus funds for unusually expensive meals. At 
the Union, individual meal costs are approximately 
equal. It is Crowe's feeling that Center dining and 
Union dining are approximately equal in overall 
quality. This opinion is born out by the fact that 
the amount of money spent per man is exactly the 
same. 

While the independent numbers are expected to 
continue to increase, present Union facilities will 
have to serve at least until the end of this year. 
The only change that Crowe foresees is the 
installation, if possible, of a second service line. 
Bevond that, he knows of no concrete plan. 



The Vietnam Moratorium 
Committee in Washington, D. C. 
has co-ordinated a strike for peace 
on Wednesday, October 15. Over 
500 colleges and universities have 
already called off classes, 
according to the newsletter sent 
out by the Committee. The stated 
purpose of the strike is to 
demonstrate to the government 
the depth of anti-war feeling on 
the campuses. 

In passing the resolution 
recommending the moratorium, 
the Student Council of Bowdoin 
pointedly refused to endorse the 
recommended purpose of the 
Committee. Instead, the Bowdoin 
day will be a day of re-assessment 
of values: it is NOT a day of 
protest, but rather a day of 
discussion. 

The Student Council has 
organized a committee to hire 
speakers and co-ordinate 
activities. Hopefully the 
committee will be able to obtain 
members of all sections of the 
political spectrum, both for 
lectures and discussions. 

"The most important thing to 
remember," stated John Cole, "is 
that this is a day of re-assessment. 
We hope that- all students will 
listen to the various arguments 
and possibly re-formulate 
opinions." By late next week 
concrete plans for the day should 
be announced. 



for FULL CIRCLE BANKING SERVICES... 
jrom MAINE'S LARGEST NATIONAL BANK. . . 
there are now 25 offices across the state 
x from which to choose 



Memb«r F.D.I.C. 



MAINE NATIONAL BANK 



FORMIRLY fIRST NATIONAL BANK of PORTLAND 



V 




PAGE SIX 






THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3, +969 




ARGONAUT 
CRAFTS 

Gurnet Bridge 
Brunswick, Maine 

Century old shop at Gurnet 
Bridge's rushing tide. Owners 
live alongside in 1912 boat 
year around. ' 

Unique oak slab tables seen 
made on premises — Unusual 
gifts — Touch of the nautical 
— Exotic imports — Maine 
Crafts — Surfboards — Lob- 
ster Traps and Buoys. 

In the 
. Heart of 
"Beautiful Downtown Gurnet" 

on Route No. 24 

3 Miles South of Cook's Corner 

10-5 MON. thru SAT. 



New Faculty . . . 

"(Continued from page 5) 

a National Science Foundation 
grant. 

M. . REGINALD LEWIS, 
Assistant Professor of 
Government and History. Mr. 
Lewis has been a Research 
Associate at the Center for Urban 
Education in New York City. He 
holds an A.B. degree magna cum 
laude from Morgan State College 



KENNEBEC FRl IT CO. 

142 MAINE STREET 

High Grade Fruits 

A Full Line of Smokers Supplies 

Fruit Baskets 

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

725-2601 



FOR SALE 

'68 Triumph GT-6, Red. Body 
and engine excellent. Needs 
some work. Must sacrifice. 
$1,700.00. 

Call: 
LT. MONCURE 

921-2331 



RAYS POCKET BILLIARDS 

189 PLEASANT STREET 
Formerly Mcintosh Outfitters Building 

• 8 New Tables 

• $.50 Per Hour with College I.D. 

• 8 Pinball Machines 

• Open Noon to Midnight 







Fresh Coffee and 

Spudnuts 

Makes 

ANYTIME SPUDNUT 

TIME" 

212 Maine Street 
Brunswick, Maine 



M0ULT0N UNION BOOKSTORE 

Welcomes 

Alumni and Guests 

of Bowdoin College 

On This Very Special 

Occasion 

INAUGURATION OF OUR 

PRESIDENT 



ROUND-UP TIME 

CHUCK ^mUmi 
WAGON _ 

Use Our Banquet and Party Rooms rte. 24 AT COOK'S CORNER, 
At No Extra Coot! BRUNSWICK 



Ipfa' 





and an A.M degree from Boston 
University. He is a candidate for 
the Ph.D. degree at Princeton. 

KARL P. MAGYAR, Assistant 
Professor of Government. Mr. 
Magyar received an A.B. degree 
from Michigan State University 
and is a candidate for the Ph.D. at 
The Johns Hopkins University. He 
has been a part-time Instructor at 
the University of Baltimore and a 
Teaching Assistant and Junior 
Instructor at Johns Hopkins. 

DR. JOHN B. MATHIS, 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 
Dr. Mathis received his B.S. degree 
at Yale and his Ph.D. degree at 
M.I.T. He was a Teaching 
Assistant at M.I.T. and studied 
under a National Institutes of 
Health Predoctoral Fellowship 
and an M.I.T. Biology Department 



Training Grant. __ SNIDER, Assistant Professor of 

«, JOHN MCKEE, Lecturer in Art. Philosophy. Mrs. Snider was 

A prize-winning photographer and,*, awarded an A.B. degree cum laude 

at Bryn Mawr College, and an 



We'll 
pay 

haff 

You pay the other. 



SPECIAL HALF-PRICE RATE 

FOR FACULTY, STUDENTS, 

SCHOOL LIBRARIES 

□ 1 year $13 
□ 9mos.$9.75 D6mos.$6.50 

□ Check or money order 
enclosed 

□ Bill me 



Name 


Address 


Citv 






State 




Zip 



PCN 



The 

Christian Science 
Monitor^ 

Box 125. Astor Station 
Boston, Massachusetts 02123 



conservation consultant, Mr. 
McKee is a former member of the 
Bowdoin faculty and former 
director of Bowdoin's Center for 
Resource Studies. He is a summa 
cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa 
graduate of Dartmouth, and 
received his A.M. degree at 
Princeton. He has also been a 
Reynolds Fellow in Belgium. 

MRS. KRISTIN A A . 
MINISTER, Instructor in Speech 
in the Department of English. 
Mrs. Minister holds a B.F.A. 
degree with high honors from 
Ohio University and an A.M. from 
Teachers College, Columbia 
University. She has been' an 
Instructor in Speech at St. John's 
University and has taught Speech 
in New York City high schools. 

DR. RICHARD E. MORGAN, 
Associate Professor of 
Government and Chairman of the 
Department of Government and 
Legal Studies. Dr. Morgan is a Phi 
Beta Kappa, cum laude graduate 
of Bowdoin. He holds M.A. and 
Ph.D. degrees from Columbia. He 
has been a Fellow in Law and 
Government at Harvard Law 
School and has been a Woodrow 
Wilson Fellow and a U.S. Steel 
Fellow in American Government. 
EDWARD T. REID, Coach of 
Squash and Tennis. Mr. Reid, who 
attended St. John's University in 
Brooklyn, N. Y., was rated the 
world's No. 1 squash player in 
1955 by the U.S. Open Squash 
Racquets Committee. He was 
national professional squash 
racquets champion in 1947, 1949, 
1950 and 1952; Metropolitan 
New York squash racquets 
champion from 1947 to 1949; 
and new England Open squash 
racquets champion in 1949 and 
1950. 

D R . C . THOMAS 
SETTLEMIRE, Assistant 
Professor of Biology and 
Chemistry. He has been a National 
Institutes of Health Postdoctoral 
Fellow at Ohio State University. 
Professor Settlemire holds B.S. 
degrees from Ohio State and his 
Ph.D. degree from North Carolina 
State University. 
MRS. KATHERINE S. 



KING'S BARBER SHOP 

212 MAINE STREET - BRUNSWICK 

Roffler Sculpture-Kut 

Men's Razor Cut & Hair Styling 



PARKVIEW CLEANERS 

212 MAINE STREET 

"On the Hill" 

WASH & DRY & 24 HOUR SHIRT SERVICE 
FREE ALTERATIONS 



HOLIDAY PIZZA 



CORNER OF UNrON & CEDAR STS., BRUNSWICK 
(Next to trre Giant Store) 

PHONE 725-2521 




Open Daily at 11 .30 a.m. 
DELICIOUS o HOT OVEN 

P,ZZA GRINDERS 

DINE IN OR TAKE OUT 
Our Dough It Mad* Fresh Dairyl 



A.Mt' at the University of 
Toronto, where she is a candidate 
for the Ph.D. degree. She has 
taught at York University in 
Toronto and held a Reuben Wells 
Leonard Fellowship and three 
Ontario Government Fellowships 
at Toronto. r 

ASHLEY STREETMAN, JR., 
Assistant to the President. A 
member of Bowdoin's Class of 
1964 with a major in Psychology, 
Mr. Streetman served four years in 
the armed services and was an 
Instructor at the Army Defense 
Languages Institute. He will have 
special responsibility with respect 
to development of Afro-American 
studies at Bowdoin. 

GEORGE B. TERRIEN, 
Lecturer in Art for the second 
semester. Mr. Terrien received a 
B.A. degree at Columbia College 
and a Bachelor of Architecture 
degree at the Columbia School of 
Architecture, where he won a 
William Kinne Fellows Travelling 
Fellowship. He has been an 
architectural designer for F. 
Kennett, Jr., of North Conway, N. 

HOWARD R. WARSHAW, 
Visiting professor of Art for the 
first semester. Mr. Warshaw has 
been a Professor at the University 
of California at Santa Barbara, 
and studied at the Art Students 
League in New York City. He has 
written articles and has been the 
subject of interviews in several 
national magazines. 

DR. ROBERT I. WILLMAN, 
Assistant Professor of History. He 
has been an Assistant Professor at 
Colorado State University. A Phi 
Beta Kappa, magna cum laude 
graduate of Harvard, Dr. William 
also received his Ph.D. degree 
there. He has held a Sheldon 
Travelling Fellowship and was a 
Teaching Fellow at Harvard. 

GERALD C. YOUNG, 
Instructor in Speech in the 
Department of English. Mr. 
Young has been a Lecturer and 
Assistant Director of Forensics at 
California State College in 
Fullerton. He holds A.B. and A.M. 
degress from California State 
College in Fullerton and an A.A. 
degree from Cerritos Junior 
College in Norwalk, Calif. 



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FRIDAY. OCTOBER 3, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 



College football's 100th 



Bowdoin's Game Started 1889 

By MARTIN FRIEDLANDER 
Orient Sports Editor 
(Ed. Note: This is the first of a two-part series on the history of football at Bowdoin College. As 
Intercollegiate football celebrates its 100th year of competition, Bowdoin doesn't trail far behind with 80 
years to. her record. Today's article deals with the events leading up to and including the first intercollegiate 
football game played by Bowdoin. The ensuing years will be covered in the second article. Unless otherwise 
noted, the bulk of the resource material has been researched from old Orients, Hatch's History of Bowdoin, 
and alumni.) 

While Princeton and Rutgers were lauding in the 
glory brought them by re-enacting the first 
intercollegiate football game, this writer was 
musing at the antics of the forerunners of 
Bowdoin's present day football 'jocks.' The Bears 
have kicked off their 80th season with all the 
fanfare and revelry due a college football game. 
However, not always was it such 'the case. There 
was a time when athletics, as a whole, let alone 
football, suffered the rejection of the governing 
boards who saw a college education as a purely 
intellectual and spiritual experience, with no room 
for physical pursuits. However, it was by t^e 
1850's that the college community was first 
noticing the effects of a physically stagnant 
existence. 

In 1859 Henry Longfellow wrote home to his 
father, "This has been a very sickly term in college 
. the college government recommended a game 
of ball now and then; which communicated such 
an impulse to our limbs and joints that there is 
nothing now heard of in our leisure hours but ball, 
ball, ball." (Hatch) Thusly, baseball was 
introduced to the Bowdoin campus and very 
quickly rose in popularity as a competitive sport. 
Inside a year, the campus was buzzing with 
athletic activity and sought a reappraisal of the 
athletic facilities available to the students at the 
time. The 1860 Bugle offered this summary of the 
"present condition of the great department of 
Callistenics in Bowdoin College; Two ropes 
(suitable for swings), one-ladder (moveable), iron 

rings, one chopping block (for jumping over), one 

wooden frame (a cross between a nail fence and a 

saw horse), four big stones (for feats of strength), 

and Pine trees (for climbing and raising emotions 

of the sublime)." Today, the Department of 

Grounds and Buildings top this array. 
The student grievances obviously had its effects 

as in the same year the college appropriated $250 

for the construction of a gymnasium. Within a 

year, the investment had paid off as was noted in 

the 1861 report of the Governing Boards Visiting 

Committee; "It's (the gym's) favorable influence 

on bodily health ... and its very happy 

intellectual and moral blessings. It is thought that 

in their (the students') vaultings and strainings and 

somersets they expend a great deal of animal 

energy which might otherwise bring them into 

serious collision with the laws of the college, and 

having opportunity for recreation and good 

influence on the college grounds, they are 

prevented from resorting ... to places of 

questionable character elsewhere." A "gym 

instructor" was then hired at a salary of $400. 

Thus, athletics made headway into Bowdoin 

College. 




Football was among the last sports to make 
headway on the Bowdoin intercollegiate schedule. 
However, its earlier forms were prevalent in 
campus tradition and ruckusing. In 1869 the 
Sophomores and Freshmen played the first game. 
The teams were members of the two classes and 
rules were similiar to those of the English kicking 
game. The tradition lasted 30 years until when, in 
the late 80's, the Seniors and Juniors took part. At 
this point the con^st degenerated into a farce 
until in 1898 it was finally abandoned. 

In September of 1899, another tradition, the 
sophomore football rush, was also abandoned. 
Hatch reports, "It had been the custom for the 
sophomores to cry football, football, as they 
marched our of the chapel and on some day during 
the first week of the year for a Freshman in the 
choir gallery to throw a football in their midst. 
There followed a vigorous scuffle for its possession 
between the occupants of the different dorm 
'ends', each group endeavoring to carry the ball 
into its own end. The rush was irreverent, delayed 



LOOKING TO SPEAR THE CARDINALS . . . this 

weekend is John Delahanty, varsity football 
captain. Here he gets in some practice in a recent 
world Arrow-Throwing tournament. 

recitations, and was somewhat dangerous." And so 
ended another old Bowdoin tradition. 

Despite all this, however, the spirit of the game 
never quite died. Early campus games often sprung 
from crowds on the campus yelling football, 
football until the numbers present warranted 
'choosing up.' Two captains would be nominated 
from those around, the choosing up would take 
place, and the game ensue. The Orient supported 
the new game, but still reserved top honors for 
baseball. It said in 1888, "We assure the friends of 
baseball that the national game could never be 
supplanted by minor sports like lacrosse and 
football, but there is no reason why a good, well 
conducted game of football should not be 
interesting, as any other athletic sport." Looking at 
the NFL's gross earnings for last year, and one 
might say this statement is born to light. 

By 1888 Rugby was the up and coming sport, 
but very soon gave way to football as the most 
popular form of intramural competition. The 
Orient of that year commented, "Football has 
gained greatly in popularity this term and if we 
may judge from the number of invalids and 
cripples among us we should say that very 
satisfactory progress has been made in the 
knowledge of the game." 

On October 12, 1899; Bowdoin participated in 
its first intercollegiate football game, bowing to 
Tufts 8-4 on a baseball field in Portland, Maine. 
The following is part of the account given by the 
October 39 Orient;" The Bowdoins met the Tufts 
on the Portland baseball grounds, Saturday 
afternoon, and were defeated in- a very close and 
exciting game by the score of 8 to 4. 

The game was called at 2:45, and the Tufts had 
the kick off. The Bowdoins were rather 
inexperienced and the Tufts rushed the ball down 
the field and scored a. touchdown. /Then they 
punted out for a fair catch, but they dribbled and 
thev rushed it across again securing their second and 
last touchdown. From this point on t^owdoins 
braced up and played a fine game. The^ worked 
the ball up towards the Tufts line and fine runs 
were made . . . finally securing a touchdown from 
which Andrews failed to kick a goal . ."It was in 
such a fashion that the Bowdoins made their 
'magnificent brace on the homestretch' and 
defended themselves nobley in their first such 
competition. 



Booters Denied Three 



(Continued from page 8) 



against high school and other 
college freshmen due to a college 
policy established last year. 
Efforts are underway to have 
Director of Athletics Daniel 
Stuckey make an exception to the 
rule*. However, Stuckey's 
advocacy of the ruling last year 
cast doubt upon the possibilities 
of seeing Girma on a varsity field 
this year. Football and Basketball 
are the only sports affected by the 
ECAC's similar ruling on 
freshmen. 

An appeal has been filed on 
behalf of Taylor and Boyes with 
the ECAC. In the past, such late 
requests have been honored and 
there is still hope the two might 
be able to play. 

Vander Jagt . 



The disturbing fact about the 
whole situation is that with a little 
more foresight and understanding 
of the circumstances by the 
officials involved, the entire 
situation could have been avoided. 
When the athletic department 
settles down from its early-season 
traumas and all the 
correspondence finds its way 
through the US mails, the 
Bowdoin soccer team may find 
itself with three valuable 
additions. If the three are forced 
to retain their present status, then 
one hopes that at least the 
individual officials involved have 
benefited from the experience and 
are more alert to the next 
situation which might damage a 
Bowdoin athletic team. 



(Continued from page 3) 
It 



impressed by his chivalry. He also 
told two amusing little stories, 
one about a boy named Bill who 
wouldn't go out in the rain and 
the other about a black militant 
called Barney. The most 
entertaining portion of his speech, 
however, was his eight minute 
tribute to that wonderful year, 
1968: "1968 was the year that a 
black preacher was shot in 
Memphis. It was the year that a 
dynamic young senator from New 
York was killed in Los Angeles . . 



$* : 



was the year that three 
Americand, three squares I 
suppose you'd call them, orbited 
the moon, and spoke of the 
wonders of God's creation." 

The congressman still has a long 
way to go in perfecting his 
performance. The best advice that ^ 
this reviewer can give him is to 
eliminate all ideas from his 
speeches and include more of 
those marvelous little stories and 
tributes, and remember Guy, 
always leave them laughing. 

&saase&ssss8$&. 



: : :::;%::>::W*W>^^ 



There comes a time 

When tomorrows become yesterdays 
And our todays are forgotten 

Alone with our lost tomorrows 



S 



1 

m 



i 



::*:*: 



King Music . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 

Lennon, Janis Joplin and Peter 
Green. 

Carla Thomas graduated from 
Tennessee University and has 
studied for her Master's at 
Howard University. She recorded 
an album, "King and Queen", 
with the late Otis Redding, and 
her recent European concert tour 
took her to 12 major cities in 
three weeks. 

During the intermission of the 
concert the Homecoming Queen 
and the winner of the fraternity 
display contest will be announced. 
Gordon W. Sewall '7 1 of 
Winchester, Mass., President of 
the Student Union Committee, 
will present trophies to the 
fraternities whose displays best 
interpret the theme "Bowdoin's 
Tenth President". 

The Queen, will be selected 
from women representing the 
College's 11 fraternities, 
independents and the Senior 
Center. President Howell will 
introduce the individual queen 
candidates and will crown the 
winner. 



. . . the Fox 
Gridders Win 17-0 

(Continued from Page 8) 



Late in the fourth quarter the 
Bears scored again on a 40 yard 
field goal by "Shanty." The field 
goal was set up on a 45 yard run 
by Benson who. first broke a 
tackle ten yards behind the line. 
The- laot WPI drive of the game 
was stopped by Dana Verrill by 
his second interception of the 
game. 



Bowdoin 
WPI 



7 









10- 17 
0- 



Demenkoff, 3 run. 
Benson, 1 run. 



Second period: 
(Kelahanty kick). 
Fourth period 
(Delahanty kick). Delahanty 40 yard 
field goal. 



IIOMIMHN KALI. SI1IKTS S< MKOl I.K 
i Mom.- r mlr<to I" <H»Wf»«* Vvprl 



HM'T. 

It S..HI 

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jm *-'i SftiHnt! 



S| tll.'M a n :«i 

Wmil mil I g^HH * II !:!•• 

II.-aiM Tni|>h> ■>' Miiw 

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(poor eyesight?) 



Want to 'jock it out?' 

(without athletic support) 

Join the Orient Sports Staff! 

Write about: football 
soccer 
sailing 
track 
& other sports 

r 

contact Martin Friedlander 
9-9445 or ext. 300 



Swimmers Clash Tonight 



By JOHN ERIKSON 

for the Orient 



The Curtis pool hosts the 
annual Freshmen (and Alumni)— 
Varsity Swimming meet this 
evening. Rumor has it that the 
odds lie in favor of a powerful 
freshman squad bolstered by such 
alumni as All-American John 
Samp and others. However, the 
varsity, with their All-American 
(Ken Ryan) and other 
experienced swimmers is expected 
to offer quite a battle in the 
abbreviated events. 

The meet will be coordinated 
by swimming coach Charlie Butt 
for the purpose of drawing 



together the frosh swimmers for 
the first time. Many of the 
freshmen are All-State or All-New 
England and hold promise to be 
the strongest squad Bowdoin has 
seen in many years. Some of the 
promising competitors are 
butterflier Rich Haudel, All New 
England breaststroker Bob Liotta, 
freestyle sprinter Rich Lucas, 
All-State distance freestyler John 
Erikson, freestylers Tom Costin 
and John Ward and breaststroker 
Brian Davis. 

j Competition gets underway at 
7:00 p.m. tonight. 



OWEN'S TAXI 

CALL , 
725-5000 or 725-5400 
9 Pleasant St., Brunswick 



"along comes a federal 
official who authorises the 
exclusion of white students, 
from all-black arrangements 
at Antioch on the following 
grounds, all ye sophists take 
note. You see, says HEW, 
white people aren't being ex- 
cluded because they're white 
— that indeed would be uncon- 
stitutional — bur because they 
do not have the 
relevant back- 
ground, namel 
blackness." 



for a frt« copy of 
Wm. F. •ueVUy't 
NATIONAL RE- 
VIEW, writ*: D*pt. 
K, 150 E. 35 SlrMt, 
N. Y. 10016. 



PAGE EIGHT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 3. 1969 



(t 



\— 




Sports Jhis Weekend 



\ 



FRIDAY 

Frosh Football 
vs Worcester Acad. 
2:00 p.m. 
Frosh Soccer 
vs No. Yarmouth 
3:00 p.m. 



SATURDAY 

Varsity Soccer 
vsWesleyan 10:30 a.m. 
Varsity Cros"s Country 
vs St. Anselms 12:30 p.m. 
Varsity Football 
vsWesleyan 1:30 p.m. 



••••More Sports on Page 7 **** 



RUNNING FREE ... is John Benson (14) for the Bears second touchdown of last week's 17-0 victory over 
WPI. Benson had the field to himself as he ran a keeper around the left end in the third period. 

photo by Bowdoin College News Service 

Gridders Shut Out WPI 17-0; 
Cardinals Fly In Saturday 

By THOMAS PROGIN 

For the Orient 

The Polar Bear eleven, with last weekend's 17-0 victory over WPI, will shoot it out with the Wesleyan 

Cardinals Saturday in the season's Homecoming Weekend contest. Though Wcsleyan's team appears 

somewhat smaller (in general) than in previous years, the Bear practice week was spent in hard drilling and 

perfection of execution, both offensively and defensively. 

Last week the Cardinals downed Middlchury 21-20. The Bears had defeated an unimproved Middlebury 
team 17-13 two weeks earlier. 




SKYDIVING. Mike Jackson (22) hurdles Worcester rusher into the air 
while blocking for Mike Denoncour's (23) punt. The Bears host 
Wesleyan tomorrow at 1:30. 



thus a straight comparison of 
scores could be misleading. In 
fact, Wesleyan had been behind 
14-0 at half time when they 
started to pick up their scoring 
game and tallied 21 points while 
holding Middlebury to six in the 
final periods. 

The Bears kicked off their HOth 
season last Saturday with' an 
impressive opening game win of 
17-0 over the Engineers of 
Worcester Poly technical Institute" 
before some 2300 partisan fans. 
Bowdoin's nearly impregnable 
defensive line held WPI to only 95 
yards rushing. The defensive 
secondary was tough also as they 
intercepted three passes and 
limited the Engineers to 104 yards 
passing. 

A pair of hard-running 
halfbacks, BUI Loeffler and John 
Demenkoff, led the Bear offense 
in each half. Quarterback John 
Benson, mixing his plays well, was 
the sparkplug who got the offense 
clicking after he had entered the 
game in the second period. 

The first quarter was marked by 
missed scoring opportunities by 
both teams. Worcester was moving 
well in the opening minutes, but 
fumbled in Bear territory where it 
was recovered by Arnie 
Tompkins. Bowdoin's ensuing 
drive stalled and a field goal 
attempt by Captain John 
Delahanty was wide right. The 
Engineers blocked a punt later in 
the quarter, but still couldn't 
score. 

The Bears pushed to the 
Engineer's one yard line early in 
the second quarter where, for • 
some reason, they attempted a 
field goal which was again wide. A 
. pass interference play gave 
Bowdoin a scoring opportunity 
with 2:00 left in the half. The 
Bears got down to the three yard 
' line where Demenkoff scored on a 
burst over right tackle. 'Shanty's' 
kick was good and the half-time 
mark stood at 7-0. 

After a scoreless third period, 
Bowdoin's offense clicked again. 
Benson quarterbacked the Bears 
to WPI's one yard line where he 
made a beautiful fake to fullback 
Haley and ran a keeper around the 
end left for the touchdown, 
Delahanty's kick gave the Bears a 
15-0 lead. 

Chip Dewar intercepted a pass 
on Bowdoin's ten yard line to 
stop a strong Worcester drive. 
(Continued on page 7) 



An international flare 



ORIENT SPORTS ANALYSIS 

by the Staff 



Booters Denied Three Players 



Sporlj excitement at Bowdoin appears to 
have taken on an international flare this fall. 
Soccer, through the universal appeal of 
Coaches Charlie Butt and Frank 
Sabasteanski, has managed to attract more 
than its usual share of exceptionally 
competant enthusiasts from the ranks of the 
campus' annual influx of foreign students. 
The flurry originates from the fact that none 
of the three soccer men can compete for 
Bowdoin under present (and previous) 
ECAC competition rules and an unbending 
college policy concerning freshmen 
competition. Bear booters with their 
protests may now join the ranks of the 
Icemen who are still fighting a "Pentagonal" 
rule which bars post season competition. 
Due to this ruling, the hockey squad was 
effectively blocked from competing in 
championship play Inst season. 

One source of irritation for those involved 
in the latest bureauocratic botch-up rests 
with a clause in the ECAC's magnamonious 
rule book which stipulates a one year period 
of "no competition" for any transfer 
student. The reasons for the clause are 
obvious, and the amount of off-campus 
recruiting on other campuses has been 
markedly reduced. However, foreign 
students sponsored by an international 
educational exchange program (like ASPAU 



and others), come under a separate heading 
and are permitted to compete as long as the 
ECAC is made aware of their sponsored 
status. Generally, this means that the 
applications are filed early enough so that 
the member colleges do not find out too 
much about the student. 

The present situation at Bowdoin involves 
two Dutch Bowdoin Plan students, George 
Taylor, 19, and Jerry Boye, 20, both from 
Holland, and Girma Ashmeron, 18, an 
Ethiopian here as a four year student. All 
three filed applications to Bowdoin on their 
own, and thus are without international 
sponsorship. This is further complicated by 
the fact that each applied late spring, making 
the finding of a sponsor somewhat difficult, 
though certainly not impossible. When the 
three arrived at Bowdoin and wanted to play 
soccer, the ears of the ECAC had already 
picked up echoes of "Olympic player", 
All-Province", etc. Girma, a forward, 
competed in the 1968 Olympic Games for 
Ethiopia while Taylor, a halfback, filled a 
position on an "All-Province" team, an 
honor comparable to "All New England in 
the U.S. Boye played on a championship 
field hockey team and competently handles 
a line position in soccer. 

One member of the Polar Bear squad 
comm ente d that if all three were playing, 




"we could pose a threat as a soccer power 
which conceiveably could run an undefeated 
season." However, perhaps the ECAC 
envisioned similar repercussion to allowing 
the Dutchmen to play, and thus handed 
down a 'no-play' edict on the late appeals. In 
Ashmeron's instance, his freshman status 
does not permit him to play varsity. 

However, it is not only the adherence to 
rules that is disturbing Taylor and Boye. "Of 
course we were very much distressed at 
finding out we were not to be able to play 
soccer for Bowdoin," commented Taylor. 
"We can understand the ruling and 
Bowdoin's obligation to adhere to it. What 
we can not understand is why some sort of 
sponsorship could not have been arranged, 
assuming that the college knew we would 
encounter this difficulty. I also tend to 
believe that had the two cases (Boye's and 
my own) been submitted separately from 
Ashmeron's, we might be playing this 
weekend. I think the idea of having an 
Olympic player compete on a college level 
scared a lot of officials." 

The other complication is Ashmeron's 

freshman standing which would have made 

him unavailable for varsity competition in 

any case. Despite his international 

experience .jO'T?" % S forced to compete 
(Continued on page 7 ) w, "* rc " : 



Soccer Team Falls to 
Springfield and UNH 

By MICHIEL ADR1AANSZ00N DE RUYTER 

Orient Sports Writer 



HEADS UP ... as Pete Heas (white, left) battles Sprinftfield player in 
last weekend's contest. Lee Rowe (white) looks on. photo oy Dave Sperling 



After suffering two defeats at 
the hands of Springfield (6-1) and 
UNH (1-0), the Polar Bear Booters 
face a strong Wesleyan team 
Saturday. Despite the two losses, 
the squad has improved over the 
past week with help coming from 
the team's international assistant 
coaches. (See article this page). 
. In last weekend's encounter, the 
team was unable to successfully 
deal with the Springfield power 
house. The Bowdoin defense 
played well in the air, but 
encountered difficulties on 
Springfield's unfevel field, 
especially around the penalty 
areas. The lone Bear scoring came 



on a well-placed lob by Pete Hess. 
Despite a lack of skills and score 
movements on the front line, the 
Bowdoin squad's stamina proved a 
stumbling block to Springfield 
and held the maroon's number of 
goals down to two in the last half. 

Against UNH, the Bears once 
again sported a front line which 
was unable to assume effective 
scoring positions, the halfbacks 
being blocked i.om position by 
their own wings. The UNH goal 
came on a loose ball picked up 
from the left wing. 

Booter practices have been 
aimed at taking greater advantage 
of scoring opportunities. 



^S, 









,''.. 



President Howell Proposes Ethnic, Futuristic Studies 



By FRED CUSICK 

Mr. President: In accepting from your hands the 
Charter, Seal and Keys of Bowdoin College, I am 
deeply sensible of the honor, the duties, and the re- 
sponsibilities with which the Governing Boards have 
invested me. Such responsibilities cannot be lightly 
assumed, and I accept your charge with the promise 
, of full dedication to the interests and concerns of 
Bowdoin College. 

Roger Howell Jr. 

Oct. 3, 1969 
When I became a Rhodes scholar an aunt of mine 
told me that she'd known five Rhodes scholars in 
her time and that every one of them had bepome a 
college president. I thought, "My God, there's a 
curse on the thing." 

Roger Howell, Jr. to a student 

Oct. 7, 1969 
College presidents in the past few years have been 
under attack by faculty, alumni, and students. It is 
not surprising then that a college president, even in 
> such a geographically and politically isolated a place 
as Bowdoin, should develop four faces: one for the 
faculty, one for the alumni, one for the students, 
and one perhaps, but only perhaps, for himself. It 
would be rather silly to condemn this hypocrisy, 
since it is a matter more of survival than hypocrisy 



and since there is little outright lying involved. 

It can be said, and fairly I think, that one of 
Roger Howell's faces, the alumni face, was predomi- 
nant during his inauguration last weekend. Since it 
was Alumni Weekend and since he was surrounded 
during his speech by the Governing Boards and 
alumni, with only a partial representation by the 
faculty and a minimal one by the students, it could 
hardly have been otherwise. 

Howell's speech was addressed primarily to the 
alumni, the "uncritical lovers" of Bowdoin as he 
called them, rather than to the faculty or the stu- 
dents. This is not to say that there wasn't much of 
interest to these groups but the tone, the phrasing, 
and above all the use of certain quotations from 
President Chamberlain indicate that it was an alum- 
ni speech. 

Some members of the faculty and the student 
body sensed, in a somewhat wrongheaded way, that 
Howell wasn't talking to them. One dean remarked, 
"It certainly took Roger a long time to get down to 
substantive matters." The feelings of many students 
were summed up by one senior, "What a rotten 
speech. It was just the same old stuff." The speech, 
however, becomes more comprehensible if one imag- 
ines oneself as over forty, balding, and worried about 
"all the crazy things that are going on around the 



country." 

The most noticeable characteristic of the speech 
was the tone. It was very respectful. It was not the 
tone of a teacher talking to students or of a pro- 
fessor talking to colleagues. Howell found it a "very 
moving and humbling experience" to become presi- 
dent of Bowdoin. While calling for a fresh start to 
be made he added that ". . . this is not in anyway 
to disparage other fresh starts made in the past by 
other presidents; " Before attempting to de- 
fine the role of the College he mentioned Hyde's 
"Offer of the College" and added ". . . there is much 
in what Hyde said." Despite the respectful tone 
Howell made it clear that things would change, 
"Years ago General Chamberlain said: Men meant 
too much when they said "Old Bowdoin." Let them 
not say it now. I take my mandate to be the making 
of a fresh start." 

Howell's use of General Chamberlain inaugural 
speech was extensive, so much so that the general's 
address formed almost a speech within Howell's 
speech. Chamberlain's authority was used to sup- 
port Howell's arguments for equality of opportunity, 
"Let the college rise, but let her also stoop a little 

to reach as many uplifted hands as possible " 

It was also used to support co-education, "President 
(Continued on page 3) 



THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK. MAINE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1969 



VOLUME XCIX 



NUMBER 2 



Committee Reconsiders Decision; Admissions Lobbies For 
Kaiser's Suspension Is Revoked College Board Elimination 






By JAY SWEET 
On June 17, 1969, Steve Kaiser 
'72 received the following letter: 

Dear Julian: 

At the end of the spring semes- 
ter you were reported failing in 
English 4 and English 32. Because 
of these failures, your case was 
reviewed by the Recording Com- 
mittee of the Faculty at its meet- 
ing on Monday. At that time, the 
Committee voted to drop you 
from college for one semester. 
You are eligible to return for 
study in the spring semester, 
1970, but if at any subsequent 
period in your career you are 
failing two or more courses, the 
Committee would probably vote 
to drop you permanently from 
the College. 

I know that these two failures 
can come as no great surprise to 
you. For a period of some time 
you realized that English 4 would 
be a failure because of your fail- 
ure to attend that course at all. 
Likewise, your attendance record 
in English 32 was also minimal 
including an absence from the 
mid-term examination. The fact 
that you did not complete your 
term paper in that course also 
contributed to your failure. 

I hope you will view this action 
of the Committee as therapeutic 
rather than punitive. The Com- ' 
mittee earnestly believes that you 
are a gifted young man capable 
of completing your college studies 
with distinction. However, it will 
be necessary for you to apply 
yourself with some rigor to your 
studies. Hopefully, a period of ab- 
sence from the College will give 
you time to rethink your own 
goals and motivation so that your 
college career will be more pro- 
ductive to you. 

If I can answer any specific 
questions or be of help in any 
way, please do not hesitate to 
write. 

With best wishes, 
Jerry Wayne Brown 
Dean of Students 

Kaiser's draft board was no- 
tified of his change of status by 
the Registrar's Office. He was re- 
classified 1-A in early September, 
and then found a job in Bruns- 
wick at the Coleman Research 
Farm. On Wednesday, October 8. 
he was readmitted to Bowdoin. 
His suspension will not appear on 
his college record. 



When Kaiser received the 
Dean's letter, he was in Massa- 
chusetts after the end of the 
spring semester. Although, as the 
letter suggests, he had known for 
some time that he would fail two 
courses, the suspension was com- 
pletely unexpected. English 4, a 
freshman year requirement 
carrying no credit, did not seem 
to him sufficient reason for being 
"dropped" from the College. At 
that point there was no possibili- 



ty of appeal; the Recording Com- 
mittee has absolute power in 
cases involving academic credit. 

Kaiser's case was presented to 
the Committee by the Dean of 
Students, recommending suspen- 
sion for a semester. Kaiser does 
not know if any other person ap- 
peared before the .committee 
while his case was being con- 
sidered; he himself was not no- 
tified of the committee's delibera- 
( Continued on page 6) 




Moratorium Is 
To Be Day Of 
Reappraisal 



ptotc k|r Htinkin 

SECOND COMING. "And what rough beast, its hour come round at last, 
slouches towards Bethlehem to be born. ' 



By ALAN HOLOD 

Monday, the faculty will consider making College Board Aptitude 
and Achievement tests optional for Bowdoin candidates. If the plan is 
approved, Bowdoin will be the first competitive college in New Eng- 
land and probably the first in the nation not requiring CEEB tests 
scores. 

Accord »g to Richard Moll, Di- 
rectrr of Adr issions, Bowdoin's 
admission policies have been em- 
phasizing "use" more than 
"ability." "What good is the per- 
son who has high ability and li- 
mited powers of application?" he ' 
asked. "We want a class with 
both high ability and strong pow- 
ers of application, but innate 
'bright' aren't as important as de- 
veloped powers of application." 

Moll claimed that, in spite of 
occasional laments from the fac- 
ulty over our Board medians, 
when he asked them to name stu- 
dents Bowdoin could use more of 
and students Bowdoin could do 
without, he found that the 'good' 
students showed a clear pattern 
of motivation in high school and 
the 'bad' students showed no clear 
trace of motivation, although 50% 
had verbal SATs over 600 and 
65% had math SATs over 600. 

Moll also referred to a report 
by Professor William Whiteside 
concerning the class of 1967. 
Whiteside's research showed that 
only 36% of the graduates of 
Bowdoin's Class of '67 who scored 
above 600 on both SATs gradu- 
ated from Bowdoin with Latin 
Honors. 64% of the students who 
scored above 600 on both SATs, 



Continued on page 5) 



Eight Await Awards 

Rhodes Candidates Are Chosen 



By NORM CABEY 

Nominations closed on October 
8 for both the Rhodes Scholarship 
and the Danforth Fellowship. The 
seven men who were selected are 
Edward H. Burtt, Bruce E. Cain, 
George S. Isaacson, Lawrence 
Putterman, Steven J. Rustari, 
Wayne C. Sanford, and Douglas 
K. Showalter. Of these seven se- 
niors, Rustari and Showalter 
were also selected as the two 
Bowdoin nominees for the Dan- 
forth award. 

Jed Burtt, a biology major, is 
interested and very active in the 
field of conservation; Jed's other 



extra curricular activities include 
serving as president of Masque 
and Gown, a lay reader and aco- 
lyte in his church, and a trainer 
for the freshmen soccer and foot- 
ball teams. He is a member of the 
Audobon Society in New Hamp- 
shire and Massachusetts, and fre- 
quently lectures on conservation 
to groups in the Brunswick area. 
He has received three national 
scientific grants for ecological 
work, a Surdna Fellowship, and 
has been on the Dean's list since 
his sophomore year. 

Bruce Cain, is a major in 
American Studies. Assistant edi- 



tor of the "Bugle," Bruce serves 
on the Curriculum Committee, 
and wrote for the "Orient" dur- 
ing his junior year. He has played 
varsity tennis and squash for two 
years, and is this year the captain 
of the squash team. He is a 
James Bowdoin scholar, has re- 
ceived "numerous" debating 
awards, and is a member of Phi 
Beta Kappa. 

George Isaacson, is a Govern- 
ment major and looks to college 
teaching as a possible future 
course. George is vice-president 
of Bowdoin's student council, 
(Continued en page >) 



By JEFF DRl MMOND 

A Committee on the Vietnam 
Moratorium scheduled for Octo- 
ber 15, composed of Roger Ren- 
frew, Steven Mclntire, Robert 
Johnson, Richard Jerue, George 
Bowden, John Medeiros, and 
George Alston have set up a 
schedule of events at the college 
for that day, as follows: 
10:00-12:00 Chapel Service 

Prayer 

Meditation 

4 student speakers 

4 faculty speakers 
2:00-2:30 Ecumenical Service 

in the chapel 
2:30-4:30 Teach-in 

open seminars and 
discussions 
5:00^5:30 Meals 
Events of the college are sched- 
uled to allow for the plans of the 
high school and the town. The 
high school is planning to show a 
film on Saigon orphans Tuesday, 
Oct. 14, at 1:00. Wednesday 
morning, Principal DeLois will 
make a rare speech over the in- 
tercom in the high school, ex- 
pressing his views on the war and 
urging teachers to call off class- 
room activities in favor of dis- 
cussions on the War. That noon 
there will be speeches, a debate, 
and discussion in the assembly. 
After this meeting, students will 
be urged to donate their lunch 
money to a fund for Vietnamese 
orphans. 

The main activities of the week 
will occur downtown, organized 
by editor John Cole of the Maine 
Times. Sunday, several clergy of 
the area will mention in their ser- 
mons that there will be a day of 
discussion on the fifteenth. On 
Monday and Tuesday, approxi- 
mately twenty-five students from 
the college and high school will 
- (Continued on page t) 



U 





1 


r% 




1 


. 








1 







\ 



PAGE TWO 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Rhodes . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 

serves on the Faculty Student 
Committee on Advanced Studies, 
and was on the debating team for 
two years. He spent his junior 
year as a student of the Univer- 
sity of Copenhagen. Among his 
academic distinctions are the 



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IN TH^ OCTOBER 




• The Fight For the President's 
Mind - And the Men Who 
Won It by Townsend Hoopes 

• The Oakland Seven by Elinor 
Langer 

• The Young and the Old- 

Notes on a New History bv 
Robert Jay Lifton 

...and, Dan Wakefield on 
The Great Haircut War 




AT YOUR NEWSSTAND NOW 



Bradbury and Achorn prizes for 
debating. 

Lawrence Putterman, a major 
in Government and Legal Studies, 
hails from Norwalk, Connecti- 
cut. His activities outside the 
classroom include: editor-in-chief 
of the "Bugle," president of the 
Young Democrats, vice-president 
and president of AISEC, a three 
year varsity golfer. He served 
last summer as a Congressional 
Intern under Senator Muskie in 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER | , | 969 



Washington, D.C. He has been pn 
the Dean's list for three years, 
was a James Bowdoin Scholar his 
sophomore year, made Phi Beta 
Kappa as a junior, and has re- 
ceived a Surdna Fellowship for 
sociology in his senior year. 

Steven Rustari is a major in 
English and hopes to teach Eng- 
lish literature in college. He is on 
both the "Quill" and "Bugle" edi- 
torial boards and is the stage 
manager for the Masque and 



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8 Pinball Machines 

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By Professor Schwartz 



you're never alone 

When you're aware that God's love is wherever you are 
loneliness and anxiety fade. That's because your very" 
identity is thejmage and likeness of God. 

This is the inspiring and practical basis of a talk Norman 
B. Holmes, C.S.B., of The Christian Science Board of 
Lectureship will give, entitled "Our Search for Identity." 

He will show how an understanding of their real identity 
set a young man on the path to a new career, and freed 
a schoolteacher from the threat of a nervous breakdown. 

You are warmly invited to come and enjoy this free 
public lecture. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE LECTURE 



„»» 



"Our Search for Identity' 

by Norman B. Holmes 

Tuesday, October 14 at 8: O0 p.m. 

Smith Auditorium, SOU Hall 



Gown. He received the Sewall who are either seniors o 

Latin Prize his sophomore year, graduates of any accredited ^ 

the Bertram Louis Smith, Jr., lege in the United States wh 

Prize in English Literature and " amhitinn la in «^.n — . . w 



the Almon Goodwin Phi Beta 
Kappa Prize his junior year. 

Wayne Sahford is a physics 
major whose future^ ambitions 
take in the field of computer sci- 
ence. Wayne is a battalian com- 
mander for ROTC, and has let- 
tered in indoor track and La- 
crosse for two years. He won the 
Alexander Speaking Prize in 
1966, made Phi Beta Kappa his 
junior year, and is a winner of 
the James Bowdoin Cup. He has 
also won the General Philoon 
Trophy and the Pershing-Presnell 
Trophy. 

Douglas Showalter, a philoso- 
phy major, served last year as 
one of the assistants to the Dean 
of Students, was a member of the 
Bowdoin Marching Band, and 
served as president of Chi Psi. 
Doug played on the freshmen ten- 
nis team and is a player for the 
squash team. He was a James 
Bowdoin scholar for two years, 
received the Consistant Academic 
Excellence Award, and was a 
winner of an Alfred Sloan Schol- 
arship. 

The Danforth Graduate Fel- 
lowship is granted to men and 
women under thirty years of age, 



"ON MONDAY, a reporter asks a 
knowing New Yorker why Nor- 
man Mailer's running, and gets the 
answer that he wants material for 
a new book. On Tuesday, Mailer 
hotly denies he has any intention 
of writing a book about his cam- 
paign. On Wednesday, a publish- 
er reports casually at lunch that a 
week earlier Mailer's agent called, 
asking for a bid on Mailer's may- 
oralty book. Ma/7-SJ For a free copy of 



er's campaign slo- 
gan is NO MORE] 
BULL . . ." 



Wm. F. Buckley's 
NATIONAL RE- 
VIEW, write: Dept. 
J, 150 E. 35 Street, 
N. Y. 10016. 




ARGONAUT 
CRAFTS 

Gurnet Bridge 
Brunswick, Maine 

Century old shop at Gurnet 
Bridge's rushing tide. Owners 
live alongside in 1912 boat 
year around. 

Unique oak slab tables seen 
made on premises — Unusual 
gifts — Touch of the nautical 
— Exotic imports — Maine 
Crafts — Surfboards — Lob- 
ster Traps and Buoys. 

In the 

Heart of 

"Beautiful Downtown Gurnet" 

on Route No. 24 

3 Miles South of Cook's Comer 

10-5 MON. thru SAT. 



ambition is in college teaching - 
a career, and who passes the cri 
term for election. The holder Kf 

n nnnfnrth Volt u:_ ucr 01 



taneously hold another, such T 
the Rhodes, his stipend beiS 
withheld until the other aS 
expires. As stated in a public? 
tion of the Danforth foundation 
m reviewing applications the ' 
look for " intellectual power 
which is flexible and of a wide 
range . . . personal character* 
tics which are likely to contri 
bute to effective teaching ^ 
constructive relationships with 
students . . . concerns which 
range beyond self-interest and 
narrow perspective." 

The Rhodes Scholarship, estab- 
lished under the seventh will of 
Cecil Rhodes in 1899, uses much 
the same criteria as does the 
Danforth. As stated in a pam- 
phlet circulated by the Office of 
the American Rhodes Scholar- 
ship, the Rhodes nominee must 
have ". . . scholastic ability, force 
of character combined with un- 
selfishness . . . leadership 
fondness for and success in 
sports." Their are 32 scholarships 
annually given in the United 
States, which is divided into eight 
regional districts. A Committee 
of Selection meeting in each state 
and each district every year. Un- 
like the Danforth scholarship 
which specifies that its recipient 
do his graduate work in the U.S., 
the Rhodes scholarship is de- 
signed to give the American 
scholar an opportunity to look at 
his country from without. He 
thus gains, as President Howell, 
himself a Rhodes scholar, put it 
"... a healthy skepticism of your 
own country," after gaining the 
perspective which living in a for- 
eign land affords. The award 
given the winner averages to 
about 550 pounds for an arts 
course to 590 pounds to a science 
course. A Rhodes scholarship is 
- awarded for two years with the 
possibility of a third if it can be 
proven as necessary to a stu- 
dent's intellectual development 
and /or career. 



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FRIDAY, 



10, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE THREE 



Kaiser Case Raises Question of "^T^ 
Student's Constitutional Rights /y A 



By JEFF DRUMMOND 

The Kaiser case has raised at 
Bowdoin the question of Consti- 
tutional rights for a student who 
is being considered for disciplin- 
ary action. When brought before 
the Recording Committee for dis- 
cipline, a student's rights are 
abridged in the following ways: 
he cannot confront his accusers; 
he cannot call witnesses in his 
own behalf; he cannot cross-ex- 
amine witnesses; he cannot tes- 
tify or refuse to testify; he is 
tried by a body bearing no resem- 
blance to a jury of his peers; the 
proceedings and composition of 
the judging body are kept secret; 
there is no court of appeals. In 
short, the Recording Committee 
is a perfect example of the type 
of judging body which the writers 
of the Constitution tried so hard 
to avoid. 

In the past five or ten years, a 
number of cases have come be- 
fore Federal Courts in an effort 
to halt these practices at other 
colleges and universities. In many 
of these cases, the court has re- 
cently decided to uphold the 
claim of the student that he has 
been treated unfairly, and or- 
dered the college to re-instate 
and revise their disciplinary 
methods. 

These decisions would have 
forced Bowdoin to change her 
ways, except for one thing.- The 
decisions have been binding only 
for state universities and colleges. 
In cases of private colleges, the 
general theory has been that it is 
a privilege to attend the college, 
and that by attending, a student 
agrees to abide by its rules. In 
the past few years, however, 
there has been increasing feeling 
that that rationalization is akin 
to the one factories used to em- 
ploy: that it was a privilege to 
work at the factory, and there- 
fore people who requested jobs 
agreed to work under the exist- 
ing conditions. Fortunately, the 
government refused to accept 
that excuse, and passed minimum 
wage laws, child and woman la- 
bor laws, and maximum hour- 
weeks. 

For two reasons, then, this 
philosophy of privilege in attend- 
ing a private institution has come 
under increasing attack. First, as 
stated above, the government in 
the last two or three years has 
come to doubt and question the 
right of the private college to 
abridge private rights. Secondly, 
there is increasing speculation 
over the phrase "state-sup- 
ported." Court decisions until 
now have used the phrase to de- 
scribe colleges who derived al- 
most total support from the gov- 
ernment. Lately, however, there 
has been feeling that any college 
which accepts grants from the 



government fits in this category. 

In discussions with a judge of 
the First Circuit Court of Ap- 
peals and a professor at the Uni- 
versity of Maine Law School, this 
reporter has found a growing ten- 
dency in legal circles to question 
the validity of a disciplinary de- 
cision if the college accepts mon- 
ey from the Federal government, 
and if Constitutional rights have 
been abridged. 

There is no question in at least 
Kaiser's case that his rights have 
been abridged. The point a judge 
would have to decide is whether 
the college has accepted sufficient 
money from the government to 
place it in the "state-supported" 
category. 

Since 1964 Bowdoin College 
has accepted the following from 
the national government: in 1964, 



construction funds of $300,000 
were used in the construction of 
the new library;, each year be- 
tween $3,000 and £5,000 have 
been accepted for purchases of 
new books; and each year ap- 
proximately five hundred thou- 
sand dollars are accepted for 
teacher training and summer re- 
search. Of course we cannot 
know what decision a Federal 
judge would make, but it seems 
very probable that Bowdoin 
would fit in the newly-defined 
category of "state-supported." 

In light of these facts, the con- 
clusion that Bowdoin is illegally 
abridging rights becomes almost 
inescapable; and if judges agreed 
in court cases, it could conceiv- 
ably invalidate any disciplinary 
actions of the Recording Com- 
mittee of Bowdoin College. 




IB KING . . . tnlnliij far _ 

ntof , Carla Thomas preceded B. B. King; and an intermission between 
the two saw Alison Bibber of Brunswick, Maine crowned as Homecoming 
Queen. 



If Enrollment Increased 



Crisis In Housing May Be Imminent 



By PAUL BARTON 

In the near future some Bow- 
doin students may have problems 
finding a place to sleep. And it 
will have nothing to do with per- 
missive social codes. Even an un- 
substantial increase in student 
enrollment could bring on a hous- 
ing crisis. 

But housing is not a separate, 
isolated problem which can be 
quickly solved by the erection of 
a new dormitory. It is the key to 
any further development of the 
campus. Housing is closely inter- 
locked with the dilemma of what 
the college environment and stu- 
dent composition should be in 5 
to 10 years. In other words, be- 
fore the college can remedy fu- 
ture housing shortages, it must 
first decide the other questions 
revolving around college expan- 
sion. 

Joseph Jefferson, Vice-Presi- 
dent for Development, believes 
the College should consider ex- 
perimenting with non-conven- 
tional housing. "For reasons I'm 
not sure anyone understands, stu- 
dents are rejecting conventional 
housing. We find students reject- 
ing what we offer and looking for 
housing in town, which just isn't 
there." 

Jefferson conjectured that 
Bowdoin could admit fifty women 
transfer students next year if it 
were willing to send them into 
town to find their own housing, 
but he does not think this is a 
good idea. He pointed to the fact 
that this policy of urban univer- 
sities has created slums, but he 
hopes Bowdoin can keep control 
over its environment and prevent 
that sort of situation. 



According to Jefferson, one of 
the problems Bowdoin will have 
to face is controlling its immedi- 
ate environment in the face of 
rapid expansion in Maine. The 
college will have to provide hous- 
ing and also prevent the area 
around the college from being de- 
veloped commercially in a way 
that might ruin the character of 
the college. 

Jefferson himself is intrigued 
by the type of housing Wesleyan 
is building, which mixes faculty 
members with people from the 
community. Jefferson thinks it 
may be possible to construct 
houses which would mix teachers, 
married students, undergradu- 
ates, and towns people. 

Once the future domiciliary 
needs of the college are deter- 
mined, there still will remain the 
problems of finding a place to put 
the structures and paying for 
them. Prime building sites are the 
college quadrangle and college 
owned land on the Old Bath Road 
adjacent to the college. The alum- 
ni, as usual, will be expected to 



foot the bill. But, it will, by ne- 
cessity, take the form of a special 
fund drive. Regular alumni fund 
receipts go toward current oper- 
ating expenses. The lack of cash 
prevents any serious short-term 
measures from being taken. 

The Senior Center could well 
become a side issue in discussions. 
If it is to remain as strictly a se- 
nior dormitory, the structure 
must be expanded if enrollment 
increases. If a significant compo- 
nent of future classes is co-ed, 
then the Center may provide even 
further "experiments in living." 

Over . Homecoming Weekend, 
the Pierce committee sat to dis- 
cuss the fature coi.se of the col- 
lege. This was the first sign of 
movement in the college decision 
making machinery. The commit- 
tee's suggestions will form a ba- 
sis for discussion on the part of 
the administration and the capi- 
tal works committee of the Gov- 
erning Board. Vice President Ho- 
kanson stated that a decision 
should be reached by the end of 
the year. 



Corridor Flares Anew: 
Cold Water, Hot Tempers 



— Special to 
The Bowdoin Orient — 

During the early hours of Octo- 
ber 7th the uneasy truce which 
has existed between Coleman and 
Hyde halls since last spring 
erupted into open warfare. Forces 
numbering in the tens engaged in 



Dialogue Dominates Moratorium Plans 



(Continued from page 1) 

distribute two thousand five hun- 
dred slow-burning candles to the 
townspeople. With the candles, 
which will be left on doorsteps, 
will be a message asking the peo- 
ple to light them at 6 :00 Wednes- 
day. 

The activities Wednesday will 
begUj^with an outdoor teach-in 
on the downtown Mall at noon. 
There will be tables for draft 
counseling for students and par- 
ents, with competent, informed 
counsellors. There will be a table 
of literature on the War and the 
draft, and a ballot-box for signa- 
tures for a moderate open letter 
to President Nixon; the letter will 
request that he evaluate his posi- 
tion on the war and think about 
the possibility of ending U.S. par- 
ticipation as quickly as possible. 

At 6:00 the churches in town 
will ring their bells, and candles 



will be lit all over town. For those 
who want to come to the Mall, 
there will be speakers, with pos- 
sibly even Peter Kyros talking. 

The candles are to perform two 
functions: first, they are to dem- 
onstrate the unity of Brunswick 
against the war, and they are a 
form of passive protest. Cole does 
not expect many adults of the 
town's three thousand households 
to take the active step of attend- 
ing the gathering on the Mall, 
and so conceived this passive pro- 
test for the others. 

Nationwide next week, many 
colleges are taking a more active 
part in protesting against the 
war. Classes have been cancelled 
at many colleges, and students 
are planning to circulate petitions 
in their towns demanding an end 
to the war in Vietnam. Sit-ins are 
expected, and some are sure to 
be faculty-organized. 



The theory of the protest is to 
call a moratorium for one day in 
October. If this produces no con- 
crete results, protests will con- 
tinue: each month, there will be 
one more day of moratorium than 
the last month, unlil the national 
government is forced to take 
drastic action. 

In view of the active protest at 
some of the other colleges, there 
is a widespread feeling that Bow- 
doin is not taking enough of a 
stand. "The students are too 
damn chicken to stick out their 
necks," one student said. "All this 
garbage about 'not having the 
power to condemn the war' is a 
rationalization for not having the 
courage to condemn the war. 
When it becomes even more ac- 
ceptable than now to protest, 
we'll see a flood of self-righteous 
papers sent to President Who- 
ever-it-is." 



a fierce water fight lasting nearly 
two hours. It is too early to tell 
the extent of the damage suffered 
on both sides although it is be- 
lieved that one window was brok- 
en in Hyde and that both sides 
are at present suffering from an 
acute shortage of toilet paper. 
The exact number of casualties 
cannot be determined until the 
Infirmary begins receiving its 
first cases of pneumonia. 

"The Two Hour War," as it is 
already beginning to be called, 
was the result of the longstanding 
rivalry of the two dormitories 
over control of the Coleman-Hyde 
corridor, the part of the walks 
that runs between South Hyde 
and Coleman. The first indica- 
tions that a possible battle was 
brewing appeared last week in 
reports of incidents in the corri- 
dor: water balloonings, the ex- 
change of challenges and obsceni- 
ties. The actual battle began 
around eleven thirty and contin- 
ued fiercely until broken up by 
the night watchman around one. 

Experts here agree that the v 
battle ended with a solid victory 
for the numerically superior Cole- 
man force. The attacking Cole- 
man group managed to penetrate 
Hyde on several occasions while 
defeating any attempt at counter- 
attack. However, it should be 
pointed out that tactically Cole- 

(Continued on page 6) 



Howell Speech 
Well Received 
But Troubling 

(Continued from page 1) 

Chamberlain . . . did not see it as 
contrary to the Bowdoin tradi- 
tion, but in fact, as closely con- 
nected to it, indeed as a logical 
extension of it," and a change in 
the curriculum, "President Cham- 
berlain was here expressing a 
truth which is so hard to learn 
Ihe realization that tradition 
in itself is not and cannot be cre- 
ative. It is clear that it is the 
tension between tradition and in- 
novation, betfeen continuity and 
change, that generates true crea- 
tivity." 

Howell's reasons for quoting so 
heavily from General Chamber- 
lain were connected with the 
alumni asjwct of his speech. He 
said after the inauguration "The 
alumni like Chamberlain, al- 
though they forget that he was a 
failure as a president . . . also I 
wanted to show that ideas on co- 
s education and curriculum reform 
were not new to BoWdoin." It 
should l)c noted that while Louis 
Bernstein, President of the Board 
of Overseers, spoke of the glori- 
ous past largely in terms of Sills 
and Hyde, Howell chose Cham- 
l>erlain and appealed to an older 
and more dynamic tradition. 

On the whole President How- 
ell's speech was interesting and 
imjx)rtanl but not original. The 
lH?st parts of it were the quota- 
tion from Chamberlain. 

Some mention should also be 
made, I think, of the inaugural 
ceremony itself. While it was 
technically successful (Howell 
was inaugurated). It struck me 
as being rather shabby. The New 
Gym is, riot the place to hold an 
inauguration. It is too large, and 
a president should not be ex- 
pected, to deliver hi sinaugural 
address under a basketball net. 
One might also mention that 
every delegate,, faculty member, 
overseer, and trustee in the pro- 
cession seemed to march to the 
sound of a different drummer. 
Finally, whoever designed the sun 
on the great seal that hung in the 
gym needs glasses. The sun 
grinned down drunkenly through- 
out the entire ceremony. 

Scoreboard 

As we enter the newschool 
year, the final campus disruption 
score card for last year reads; 
900 students expelled or sus- 
pended and 850 students repri- 
manded at 28 of the major trouble 
schools. Six universities where un- 
rest occurred took no action. J. 
Edgar Hoover himself reports 
4,000 arrested in campus disorders 
(during fiscal 1969.) 




THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER I 




■\ 



BOWDOIN ORIENT Council Votes Moratorium Day Nears For 



Volume XCIX 



Friday, October 10, 1969 



Number 2 



Issacson Bill 



Kaiser and Due Process 

Steve Kaiser's case raises the question of how this college can 
use its discretion to determine who should be allowed to remain 
in school and also guarantee students their fundamental rights. 
The Recording Committee, which suspended .Kaiser and later 
reinstated him, has such discretionary powers that it does not 
have to and, indeed, does not guarantee due process for stu- 
dents. 

Originally, the Recording Committee performed the function 
x that its name implies: At the end of each semester, its members 
sat down and recorded the grades of all students. As the college 
has evolved, the Committee's powers have increased to include 
all questions involving academic requirements and credit. Un- 
fortunately, the Committee has never devised any standard rules 
of due process, but has been content to depend on its own good 
intentions to protect students. 

It is chaired by the Dean of the College, and includes the 
President, the Dean of Students, and six faculty members. Pe- 
titions to be heard are prepared by one of the Deans, and testi- 
mony in either oral or written form is solicited from all interested 
faculty members. The meetings are closed. No record of the 
| meetings is kept, but written testimony is placed in the student's 
permanent college file. Although there is no rule prohibiting a 
student's appearing at the hearing of his petition, he is neither 
invited nor informed of his right to attend. In the experience of 
the present Dean of the College, no student has ever appeared 
before the Committee. The student has no opportunity to dis- 
pute anything said about him and is denied access to written tes- 
timony. 

The discretionary powers of the Committee have increased 
greatly since the inception of the new marking system. It is pos- 
sible that two students might fail the same two courses, and that 
one would be allowed to continue while the other one was sus- 
pended from the college. Testimony is offered regarding the 
student's motivation, attitude, and any extenuating personal 
circumstances,, 

By these means the Committee attempts to act in the best in- 
terest of the student and college. Of course, the student is not 
being tried for a crime. The committee is seeking to determine 
whether is might not be best for all concerned that the student 
leave school. Some might question whether the college should 
attempt to make decisions of this sort at all, but even those who 
concede the right must admit that present procedures are much 
to arbitrary. 

Under current procedure, the personal prejudice of a Dean or 
faculty member may radically alter the outcome of a case. Dur- 
ing the course of the semester, the same Dean who may have 
counselled a student could be his advocate or prosecutor, and 
judge. . . . There is also no real appeal possible, because the 
President of the College is a member of the Committee. 

Three specific procedural reforms are necessary to guarantee 
student rights. First, students should be invited to attend, and 
allowed to question testimony. The justification for the present 
closed hearings is that a student's privacy must be insured. We 
wonder, however, just whose privacy is protected. 

A recent Supreme Court decision asserts the right of due proc- 
ess over this alleged protection of privacy in cases involving ju- 
veniles. The principle is also applicable to the proceedings of the 
Recording Committee. It is intolerable that any information re- 
garding a student's case be withheld from him. It is also intoler- 
able that he not be informed of the right to testify. 

An effective route of appeal must be created. Dean Greason 
has suggested that this might be accomplished by removing the 
President from the Committee and allowing him to decide ap- 
peals. This would certainly be a step in the fight direction. But 
we should also consider including other members of the faculty 
or administration on the appelate body. 

Finally, actions taken at the end of the spring semester must 
be subject to immediate appeal. Presently, the only appeal open 
to a student is to re-petition the Recording Committee when they 
meet again, one week before classes in the fall. Students must 
not be compelled to. wait that long. 

In an interview yesterday, Dean Greason acknowledged the 
necessity of reform, and agreed to discuss specific measures with 
the Recording Committee before its next important meeting. 
We urge that reform be immediate and complete. 

THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Member of the United States Student Press Association 



Editor 
Alan KoM 



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Boh Nuh 

News Editor 
Jay Sweet 

Sports Editor 
Martin Priedl.nder 



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Bab Armtronr 

Advertising Manager 
Peter Mejstrick 

Otic* Manager 

Fred Lanrerman 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
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Pan! Barton. Paal Batista. 

THE BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
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On Asian War 



By FRED CUSICK 

"There comes a time when you 
guys have just to act as thinking 
human beings." the Student 
Council of Bowdoin was told last 
Monday night. The plea was 
made during a debate that ended 
with the passage, on a roll call 
vote of the Issacson resolution on 
Vietnam. The resolution read: 

The Student Council of Bow- 
doin College opposes the United 
States involvement in the Viet- 
nam war on the grounds that its 
participation is detrimental to 
the people of South Vietnam, to 
peace in Southeast Asia, and to 
the resolution of America's do- 
mestic problems. We condemn 
the war as immoral and support 
the immediate withdrawal of all 
United States' troops from South 
Vietnam as the quickest and most 
equitable means of ending the 
war and stopping the senseless 
waste of American and South 
Vietnamese life. 

Supporters of the resolution 
had been worried over whether 
the Council would even agree to 
debate it. When it was introduced 
at the Sept. 30th meeting the 
Council voted to table it almost 
immediately while many of the 
Council members expressed 
doubts over whether the Council 
had a right to express opinions 
on "political" matters. The res- 
olution, however was taken from 
the table without debate and a 
lively discussion followed during 
which many members of the 
Council and representatives from 
the Young Republicans and the 
Young Americans for Freedom 
expressed their opinions. 

The opponents of the measure 
argued that the Student Council 
had not been elected to deal with 
national issues, e.g. the war, and 
that the passage of Issacson's 
resolution would give a false im- 
pression of student opinion on 
Vietnam. Supporters of the reso- 
lution pointed out that the reso- 
lution said that only 'the Council 
and not the student body was ex- 
pressing its opinion. 

Bob Johnson, president of Afro- 
Am., made a strong plea in fa- 
vor of the resolution: "I mean, 
maybe you haven't seen some of 
the things that are wrong with 
this country, but I've seen them 
because I've lived with them. I've 
seen what their doing to the In- 
dian, and to the black man, and 
in Vietnam. . . . Damnit! We've 
got to use our minds.- We just 
can't sit back and do nothing." 

Alter a debate lasting 20 min- 
utes a roll call vote was held and 
the measure passed 17 to 6 with 
2 abstentions. 

By Council request the above 
resolution will be sent to the 
Dean of the Faculty and he will 
be requested to read it at the 
next Faculty meeting. In addition 
the resolution will be distributed 
to the Student Councils of other 
colleges in Maine. 

This is a breakdown of the roll 
call vote: 

Officers 

John B. Cole — President 

presiding officer does not vote. 

George S. Isaacson — Viec Presi- 
dent yes 

August C. Miller, III _ Secre- 
tary-Treasurer abstain 

Fraternity Representatives 
Vincent A. DiCara — Alpha 

Delta Phi yes 
Douglas H. Crowther — Alpha 

Kappa Sigma no 
Roy J. Bouchard — Alpho Rho 

Upsilon no 
R. CSjjstopher Almy — Beta 

Theat Pi no 
Geoffrey B. Ovendeh — Chi p s i 

yes 
William Branting — Delta Kappa 

Epsilon no 
Steven E. Maclntyre — Delta 

Sigma yes 

Continued on page 5) 



- Discussion Of Vietnam Issue 



By RICK FITCH 

College Press Service 

Like the star too distant to be viewed clearly through a tele 
or the germ too small to be seen through a microscope, the U S' C °^ 
lege student has remained an unknown and therefore enitr 
quantity since the start of the 1969-70 academic year. m S m atic 

This fall, he has scurried about busily preparing for the Oct 
Vietnam War Moratorium, protested the University of Californ • 
dismissal of a communist instructor, launched rent strikes at f S 
schools, and held a boycott of classes at the University of Michi Ur 
in support of demands for a student-operated bookstore. 

Despite this bit cf empirical evidence and despite the postulate 
and predictions offered by sociologists, psychologists, the commercial 
press, government-commissioned task forces, etc., it's anyone's eut* 
as to whether the issues of the war, the draft, racism, and educT 
tional and social reform on the campus will incite this year's stude t 
to the same level of frustration and dissent as occurred last year 

Colleges and universities across the country braced for the n 
year according to their perceptions of reality. 

- Some apparently saw the student's nature as being close to innatelv 
evil. The City College of New York, for example, stationed armed 
security guards in the building where students were registerine for 
classes. Temple University formed its own 125-man campus noli™ 
force. s Fwi.e 

The University of Wisconsin and University of Michigan both have 
developed over the summer civil defense plans to employ in the event 
of building occupations or violent demonstrations. Michigan also fire- 
proofed and bomb-proofed files containing important documents 

.Other institutions, while not following the /aw and order on the 
campus theme so overtly; equipped old disciplinecodes with new teeth 
aimed at chomping down on so-called disruptive activities. 

Cornell University, which endured an armed building occupation by 
militant blacks last year, added a disciplinary clause prohibiting "mis- 
conduct sufficiently serious as to constitute a violation of or threat to 
the maintenance of the public order." The clause covers faculty mem- 
bers as well as students, and the maximum penalties are the dismissal 
of the former and expulsion of the latter. A 21-member hearing board 
with four student members will have jurisdiction in misconduct cases 

The University of Illinois sent a letter to parents of undergraduates 
warning: "When ... a student is found to have knowingly engaged in 
a disruptive or coercive action, including knowing participation in a 
disruptive cr ccercive demonstration, the penalty will be dismissal or 
suspended dismissal." Other schools, including Ohio, Indiana, Purdue, 
and North Carolina have released similar conduct statements. 

At the State University of New York at Stony Brook — the scene 
of several mass drug busts during the past two years — students 
now face suspension for an arrest on a drug law violation and expul- 
sion for a conviction. On many campuses, including Stony Brook, stu- 
dents have demanded in recent years that administrations stay out 
of the policing business, particularly when drugs are involved. 

In Ohio, Gcv. James Rhodes said he would send state troopers or 
National Guardsmen to quell campus disturbances, whether or not 
the university administrations askek for them. 

Returning students were greeted \with curricular and structural 
changes, as well as warnings, at many schools. Whether they were 
intended as eppeasing gestures or in sincere recognition of the stu- 
dents to relevant learning and self-determination is a matter for con- 
jecture. 

Black studies programs have burgeoned across the U.S., paralleling 
an increase in the number of blacks attending colleges. Dartmouth, a 
school that has graduated fewer than 150 blacks in its 200-year his- 
tory, has 90 blacks in a freshman class of 855. 

Other eastern colleges have taken similar steps. Brown University 
has increased the number of blacks in its freshman class from eight 
in 1966 to 77 currently; Wesleyan, from 30 to 51; Yale, from 31 to 96; 
and Harvard, from 40 to 95. Harvard also recently announced it had 
established a Department of Afro-American Studies, offering 15 
courses, including one on the "black revolution." The Ivy League in- 
stitution has appointed a 35-member committee to prepare proposals 
for structural change based on a report on last year's disorders. 

For Stanford's 6,000 returning students, new educational reforms 
meant an end to most graduation requirements, including those in 
foreign languages. Individual departments have been asked to design 
options to permit a student to take at least one-half of his work out- 
side the requirements of his major. The number of freshman seminars 
conducted by senior faculty members has been expanded so that 369 
of 1,400 freshmen are in the seminars. 

At Brown University, letter grades have been abolished in favor of 

satisfactory-no credit" evaluation. Some courses may still be taken 

tor a grade, but participation is voluntary. The minimum course load 

tor an undergraduate degree has been lowered, and independent study 

programs greatly expanded. 

The University of Pittsburgh has reduced from 15 to nine the num- 
oer of credits required per term of lower division students in univer- 
sity-specified disciplines, and has converted from a pass-fail grading 
op ion for juniors and seniors only to a satisfactory-unsatisfactory 
option for all students. The option is good for one course each term. 
r~r7ifi V ™ y * committ «*s have been opened up to student mem- 

oersnip. ine American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 
™ Vk 8 . ma " y small «\ state and community colleges, reported 
h»if r V st " dents were siting on administrative councils at over 
half of its member schools. 

nf S An?H ntS *\ 2"'° State now sit on th e Faculty Council and Council 
rWrS i 5" C , A ^ ai "' and tnose at 0b er»n are included on the Judicial 
adding?? J*" 1, Fisk ' Vanderb »t, and Princeton universities have 

S=l w 6 " f.° r recent equates to their boards of trustees, 
sturw. . recentl y ^wne the first state to pass a law giving 
ine iSaii! n 8 membershi P on state college and university govern- 
boaiSk «?' 0ne . student w "» sit on each of the state's give governing 
M^s«ch,^7 ee » , r g the Unlversit y of Massachusetts. Southeastern 
colleec; fnn % ersi,y ' Lowe11 Technological Institute. 11 state- 
coueges and 12 community colleges 

ernlM E^h. "V*?" 1 ^"^ntatives are now included on the gov- 

SSEJ& of Wa^S" 01 * '" *"*"*' aBd Wy ° ming "* * "* 

schools ^^w 6 agains ^ " in loco Parentis" still goes on at some 
for id wom J? n,v T^ ty of Mar yland this fall abolished women's hours 
its no-curfSTiut University has added sophomore women to 

* i (Continued on page 6) ' 



FRIDAY. OCTOBER 10, 1969 



SaP's May End 
For 74 Class 

(Continued from page 1) 

therefore, did not graduate from 
Bowdoih with honors (the Verbal 
median for this class at entrance 
was 600; the Math median was 
630). 50 members of the Class of 
'67 received Latin Honors at 
Commencement. Of this group, 24 
students,' or nearly Vi, had one 
SAT score below 600. 12 students 
had averages of less than 600 on 
the two tests. Of this same class, 
39 men graduated Mi-h Depart- 
mental Honors. Of the 39, 62% 
had less than 600 on at least one 
SAT, and 36% had averages of 
less than 600 on the two SAT's. 

In the last two years the ad- 
mission office has not considered 
Board scores of paramount im- 
portance; however, school coun- 
sellors and parents are still under 
the impression that Board scores 
are given priority. The admissions 
office and the Faculty Committee 
on Admissions and Financial de- 
cided the only way to convince 
secondary schools and parents 
that recommendations, motiva- 
tion, and performance in the 
classroom are the most important 
factors in admissions, is to make 
Board scores optional. 

"In short, making the CEEB's 
optional for Bowdoin candidates 
would not only attract the appli- 
cations cf more highly motivated 
but low scoring students, but 
would also be a more honest rep- 
resentation 'of Bowdoin's flexi- 
bility in judging candidates for 
admissions," Moll summarized. 
He believes that a large number 
of students will submit then- 
scores anyway, but "not report- 
ing scores would not necessarily 
imply that a student is of low 
ability." 
Moll concluded, "During the 



past year, we have made sound- 
ings at many schools across the 
country regarding the advisability 
of making the CEEB optional. A 
tew have raised eyebrows, but the 
general response has been over- 
whelmingly favorable." "Making 
the College Boards optional will, 
I think, encourage many highly 
motivated students .to apply to 
Bowdoin in the belief that we 
truly are emphasizing perfor- 
mance rather than innate intelli- 
gence, will win us many friends 
in secondary schools, and will win 
the respect and endorsement of 
ether important colleges."* 

Student Council . . 

(Continued from page 4) 

John T. Philipsborn — Psi Upsi- 

lon yes 
Joseph M. Cusack — Sigma Nu 

yes 
George H. Butcher — Theta 

Delta Chi abstain 
Peter H. Mulcahy — Zeta Psi 

not present 

Independent Representative 

Matthew H. Hunter yes 

Class of 1970, 

Representatives At Large 

Stephen B. Lang not present 
Roger A. Renfrew yes 
Thomas S. Walker yes 

Class of 1971, 
Representatives At Lar-e 

Bruce R. Brown no 
Robert A. Carpenter yes 
Robert C. Johnson yes 
Owen W. Larrabee yes 
John C. McPhillips yes 

Class of 1972, 
Representatives At Large 

Michael W. Bushey yes 
Stephen D. Fendler 
Richard G. Kimball 
Edward J. Macioci 
James A. Sterling 

Totals: 17-yes, 6-no, 2-abstain, 
2-absent from meeting 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 




PAGE FIVE 



Howell Announces 



Its Up To Teacher On 15th 



yes 
no 

yes 
yes 



Bowdoin College has always 
considered it a central part of its 
educational task to promote stu- 
dent interest in social and politi- 
cal problems. However, as was 
stated at the Opening Convoca- 
tion this year, the College holds 
that it should not itself become a 
partisan in political debate. In- 
stead, the campus is to be a for- 
um where partisans of various 
persuasions are permitted to ex- 
press and discuss their views 
freely. 

In accordance with this policy, 
the College fully endorses the 
right of students and faculty to 



take part in a moratorium in op- 
position to the war on 15 October. 
Equally, it endorses the right of 
those who hold contrary views on 
the war not to take part in such 
a moratorium. All forms of politi- 
cal expression are allowed on 
campus so long as they are ex- 
pressed in a civil manner con- 
sistent with the maintenance of 
academic freedom for all mem- 
bers of the community. Each fac- 
ulty member, and each student as 
well, will be responsible to him- 
self for his pattern of activity on 
15 October. As an institution, the 
(Continued on page 6) 



Young Dents 
Condemn War 



We the members of the Bow- 
doin Chapter of the Young Demo- 
crats,- do hereby humbly submit 
the following position in regard 
to the October 15th National Day 
of Moratorium. 

,(1) We support the National* 
Day of Moratorium and endorse 
its objectives. We sympathise 
with and indeed encourage the 
boycotting of classes on October 
15 and the directing of our 
thoughts and energies to the ter- 
mination of the tragic and pro- 
longed Vietnamese conflict. 

(2) We interpret President 
Nixcn's call to the American pub- 
lic for a "united front" as an at- 
tempt to muffle the constructive 
and responsible criticism of con- 
cerned Americans. Further, we 
deplore the President's statement 
of September 26, 1969, in refer- 
ence to the October 15 Moratori- 
um, in which he stated, "under no 
circumstances will I be affected 
by it," and sincerely hope that, 
that day will help awaken our 
government to the expressed will 
of the American people. 

(3) We deem any continuation 
of hostilities in Vietnam as a 
senseless, purposeless, and unnec- 
essary waste of American and 
Vietnamese lives, and accordingly 
favor an immediate withdrawal 
of American forces from that 
war-weary land. 

The Bowdoin Yound Democrats 
8 October, 1969 



FRESHMAN CROSS COUNTRY 

Coach: Frank K. Sabasleanski 

Oct. 14 Mors.- & Watervilie H 4:00 

Oct. T> Hebron ' A 3:30 

Oct. 28 Colby H 12:30 

31 Knstorns 

A Bates H 3:30 

FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 
Coach: Mortimer F. LaPointe 
Oct. 17 Bridjrton Academy H 2:00 

24 No. Yarmouth Acad. A 2:00 
31 Maine . A 1:30 



Oct. 

Nov 



Oct. 
Oct. 



Chicago Eight Elevated At Expense Of Pig Nation 



By NANCY BEEZLEY 
College Press Service 

"There are two nations on trial here — the pig na- 
tion and the nation of the future," according to 
Abbie Hoffman, one of the eight "conspirators." It 
is the United States of America versus the nation of 
the future. Of the world series of injustice with the 
Chicago Conspiracy vs. the Washington Kangaroos. 
Downtown Daleyland. And U.S. District Judge Julius 
J. Hoffman predicts that this is going to be a long 
trial. 

"There seem to be two laws in Chicago — one for 
the, people and one for us," says Dave Dellinger, one 
of the defendants. 

Hoffman has banned picture taking and electronic 
coverage of the trial. He has banned almost every- 
thing else too. 

Hoffmari charged tbe U.S. Marshal with the task 
of issuing 75 press passes on a "First come first 
serve basis," except that seme media representatives 
were contacted by the Marshal and some weren't. 
Defense attorney Leonard Weinglass asked Hoffman 
to grant a press pass to Black Panther Party Minis- 
ter of Information and to a Black journalist. "I don't 
know what that party (the Black Panther Party) is. 
It is impossible to seatr airthe~members of the press 
who deserve a place," Hoffman said. 

The 18 co-conspirators, Hoffman said, are mem- 
bers of the public and have to stand in line every 
morning to be admitted on a first come first serve 
basis. This, he said, applies to the ACLU representa- 
tive too. As one member of the public said, "It's like 
a ball game, you want a good seat, you get here 
early and stand in line." (CPS got a seat.) 

Weinglass illustrated the crowded conditions of 
the courtroom by asking the "friends and relatives" 
of the defendants to stand. Only 16 were present ' 

u)h he Said ' at Ieast " 1,00 ° are waitin « downstairs." 
When Weinglass offered to underwrite one half of 
the cost of moving the trial to a place big enough 
to seat concerned and interested persons, Hoffman 
said, "i m obligated to sit here not in the interna- 
tional amphitheatre." 

These are the same men who went to Chicago last 
year to protest "facism, racism, repression, poverty, 
w ar, exploitation, pigs, piglettes, weeners, puritanni- 
a« smut. . . ." These are men, who as defendant 
"jve Dellinger has said, feel the worst part of the 
nai is being tied up in court for three months in- 
stead of being out organizing against the war in 
Th am ' racism and tne military-industrial complex, 
i hey are conspirators who don't even agree to 
«>nspire. Dellinger says. "We came not to battle the 
thi 6 u 1 * comin 8 back here not ashamed of any- 
ming that happened in Chicago, we're coming back 



in the hope that the^truth will be known." Abbie 
Hcffman says, "We are flower children, but we have 
had to grow some thorns. We are coming to! fight." 

They are, one young lawyer says, "different from 
the kids who came for the Chicago convention. These 
kids are looking for trouble ... the cops are too 
ccol this time to start trouble: If there is trouble it 
is the kids who will start it. An the whole world is 
watching. It is too bad, if that happens, people will 
go back and say it was the kids who caused the 
trouble last year after all." . 

They are radicals who know it is useless to even 
worry about constitutional rights. 

They are a group of decentralized students who, 
as one "demonstrator from South America said, "are 
too decentralized. You don't know who is willing to 
fight, too many people stand around. America has 
no unity. The only unityjs democracy and there isn't 
a democracy . . . demonstrators are each protesting 
a different thing." 

They are members of the Black Panther Party for 
Self Defense who "are here to talk about Bobby 
Seale," one of the eight defendants and a co-founder 
of the Panther party. They are saying, "We got the 
beat. It has never stepped since 1966, since Mao and 
Fidel and Che. It can't be stopped until facism stops. 
We got the beat cause we understand the revolu- 
tionary cause. We're high from serving the people. 
As long as the beat gees on the people go on, the 
struggle gees en, the revolution goes on." 

The eight men have been charged with a "crime" 
— traveling in interstate commerce . . . with the in- 
tent to incite, promote, encourage, participate in and 
carry on a riot — which could result in up to ten 
years imprisonment and fines of up .to $20,000. The 
charge was and still is intended to be a political 
weapon which, according to a sponsor of the original 
bill, "would allow the FBI to apprehend the Car- 
michaels who leave the city before the riot they in- 
cited takes place." 

"Based on the premise that America has no social 
problems, only 'outside agitators,' the anti-riot law 
turns on the proposition that the government should 
punish radical organizers for their thoughts, inten- 
tions, and speech. The law can put virtually any po- 
litical opponent behind bars. The Attorney General 
has already suggested that it will be the major tool 
in the government's arsenal against the movement. 
Lawyers claim that it lays the legal foundation for 
the police state," The Conspiracy charges. 

The law doesn't even call for an act to be com- 
mitted, Weinglass says. "The government is seeking 
to impose a penalty for people having a state of 
mind." 

"We were defeated last year by the cross town 
pigs. . . . Our conspiracy is breathing together," 



Abbie Hoffman says. The conspiracy trial is, as Dell- 
inger sees it, "Nixon's fall program to serve notice 
to (he youth that it is not safe for them to express 
themselves" it is his warning to black people, to 
students, to the antiwar movement. 

..conspiracy publicity says, "If the government in- 
tends to use conspiracy charges as a new instrument 
i :. realized "oppression, we must turn such charges 
intl) a rallying cry for liberation. ... A conspiracy 
is needed against the injustices that brought the 
movement to the Democratic Convention in the first 
place: the war in Vietnam, racism, police brutality 
and frame-ups, counter-insurgertcy programs at 
home and abroad, a capitalist system which exalts 
private profit and the perogatives of poverty over 
human dignity and community." 

The chances for a fair trial seem small, for, as 
Abbie Hoffman says, "The. judge is going around 
saying things like I'm his illegitimate son . . . we're 
differenL_I-Bet stoned on pot and he's a Geritol 
freak." 

Defense attorneys have made several attempts to 
get Hoffman to remove himself from the case. One 
such request said, "The defendants and the lawyers 
have on several occasions noticed Judge Hoffman's 
personal hostility to them and their political views 
and values. Also, Judge Hoffman and his wife have 
a financial stake in the continuation of the war in. 
Vietnam because of stockholdings in corporations 
holding large contracts with the Defense Depart- 
ment." Hoffman has repeatedly refused to remove 
himself from the case. 

The government has continually harassed the de- 
fendants and their attorneys. Harassment has taken 
several forms, from admitted wire tapping to spend- 
ing six days in secretly transporting Bobby Seale 
across the country to the site of the trial (thus 
keeping him out of. communication with attorneys 
and co-defendants during the critical pre-trial peri- 
od), to mutilating pieces' of mail. Seale and Jerry 
Rubin have been denied the right to speak to the 
press. Judge Hoffman has refused to grant continu- 
ances — even when it became apparent that Charles 
Garry, the chief trial counsel, had to be absent for 
emergency surgery. On the. first day of the trial, 
Hcffman issued warrants for the arrest of four de- 
fense attorneys who had previously said they would 
net be part of the courtroom defense team. They , 
wore ordered by Hoffman to appear in court. 

There is hostility, but things have not yet reached 
r pen warfare. Abbie Hoffman says, "In the halls of 
justice, the only justice is in the halls." Maybe the 
near-certain conviction will be reversed in a higher 
c?£?^5 Ut U is P robabl y more realistic to raise the 
5100,000 which, according to Hoffman (Abbie) "we 
need to bribe the judge." 



PAGE SI 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 



Steve* kcriser 
Readmitted 



(Continued from page 1) 

tions, nor was he ever offered ah 
opportunity to speak before it. 

At the start of the current se- 
mester, Kaiser went to the Dean 
of the College to discuss his case. 
According to Kaiser, the Dean 
conceded that as far as )ie could 
determine a student has never 
before been suspended from the 
college for failing one accredited 
course and English 4. Kaiser then 
appealed his case in writing to 
the Recording Committee, which 
reversed its original decision and 
readmitted Kaiser. 

The Committee's error made it 
impossible for Kaiser to return to 
classes this semester. Since he re- 
quires financial assistance, he 
plans to apply for a scholarship 
to continue his work next semes- 



lollege Roundup . . . 



_r 



nmmmgHHming 



COOK'S CORNER, Route 24, BRUNSWICK 
PHONE 729-9896 



D»IVI IN 
tISTAURANT 



(Continued from page 4) 

Meanwhile, though the campuses have been quiet in the early weeks 
of 1969-70, students have been organizing. 

At the University of- Colorado students have formed a tenants union 
and are ready to begin a rent strike. Rent strikes already are under- 
way in the c&mmunities surrounding the universities of Michigan, 
Wisconsin, and California at Berkeley. 

Promotion of the Oct 15 Moratorium appears to be the major stu- 
dent political activity of the fall Leaders of the national Vietnam 
War Moratorium Committee claim students at more than 500 colleges 
are committed to spending that date in teach-ins, rallies, and vigils 
against the war. 

Activities are proceeding at such disparate institutions as Berkeley, 
where the city council voted 5-4 recently to support the Associated 
Students of the University of California in their planned "day of dem- 
onstrations." and Western Illinois University, where 1,200 have signed 
petitions supporting the class boycott and moratorium rallies have 
drawn crowds of 600. 

^Coleman - Hyde 
Truce Begins 

(Continued from page 2) 

man had several advantages over 
Hyde. Not only did the Coleman 
group outnumber the Hyde group 
but Coleman Hall is so placed in 
conjunction to Hyde that it can 
bring a maximum number of win- 
dows (especially lavatory win- 
dows so essential in maintaining 
a steady supply of water) to bear 
against a minimum number in 
Hyde. "In naval parlance Coleman 
"crosses the T" of Hyde. Also the 
positioning of the doors in Cole- 
man makes it, unlike Hyde, invul- 
nerable to attack from the rear. 

As of 2100 Tuesday no inci- 
dents were reported in the corri- 
dor, but further action is ex- 
pected in the days, months, anrj. 
years ahead. 

Frederick Cusick 



ter. His current draft status is 
also questionable. He is appealing 
the 1-A classification, and by the 
time his case is considered, he 
hopes to be enrolled as a full 
time student. 



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Graphic Sale On Tuesday 
In Walker Art Building 



A sale of original graphics by 
the old masters and 20th century 
artists will be held in the Bow- 
doin College Museum of Art 
Tuesday. 

Richard V. West, Director of 
the Museum, said the sale, pre- 
sented by The Lakeside Studio of 
Lakeside, Mich., will be held from 
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Walker 
Art Building Rotunda. 

The collections of The Lakeside 
Studio contain works by such old 
masters as Beham, Durer, Pensz 
and Rembrandt, and the modern 
artists Appear Braque, Miro and 
Picasso, plus a special collection 
of American artists. All are on 
sale at prices ranging from $5 to 
$3,000. 

John D. Wilson, owner of The 
Lakeside Studio, was previously 
a Vice President of Ferdinand 
Roten Galleries, a distributor of 
prints by old masters and contem- 



porary artists. Mr. Wilson said 
that in the print workshop of the 
Studio "we, bring together tlje_ 
artist and the printmaker so that 
they can learn and broaden their 
perspectives in every facet of the 
graphics^' 



Howell's 



(Continued from page 5) 

College should not and will not 
take a stand on the specific ex- 
pression of views. 

Should a significant portion of 
the College community wish to 
express their views in writing to 
the government, I will gladly for- 
ward any such communication to 
our Congressional delegation and 
to President Nixon, along with a 
covering letter explaining the cir- 
cumstances. 

Roger Howell, Jr. 



PARKVIEW CLEANERS 

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* 

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FREE ALTERATIONS 




Fresh Coffee and 

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TIME" 

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Brunswick, Maine 



Department of State 

FOREIGN SERVICE 

Written Examination for Officers U.S. Foreign Service, De- 
partment of State and U.S. Information Agency, scheduled 
December 6, 1 969. Seek particularly candidates with back- 
grounds in : 

ECONOMICS, ADMINISTRATION and 
PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

Deadline for Application 
OCTOBER 24, 1969 

Write: College Relations, BEX/CR, Department of State, 
Washington, D.C. 20520 for applications. 



THE HIP HOP 




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LOWEST AIR FARES TO EUROPE 

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s 



UDAY. OCTOBER 10, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 



"irma Ashmeron Interviewed 



"==7T 



Ethiopian Olympic Soccer Player At Bowdoin 



| (Ed. Note: Nineteen year old Girma Ashmeron comes 
Bowdoin as a full time four year student after corn- 
Sting two years of schooling in an Ethiopian Univer- 
ky. The son of an Ethiopian provincial governor, Ash- 
■Jeron lives in Addis Ababa and is studying here as a 
■>wdoin Plan student with freshman status. He is seek- 
Bg a degree in economics and plans to return to his 
fcntry after his four years here and take up teaching. 
■However, Girma's uniqueness comes not from his aca- 
Bnic pursuits, but rather his athletic ones. The young- 
pt member of the 1968 Ethiopian Olympic Soccer Team, 
■ has been rated the fastest player on his national 
■iem, and possibly one of the fastest in the entire Afri- 
jftn continent. A Kenyan magazine "Nation Sport," said 
■ Girma last year, "he is considered to be one of the 
■est ball dribblers in Africa. . . ." His international ex- 
igence in playing for his country has taken him to 
■tches in Germany, Italy, Tanzania, Kenya, France, 
■d, of course, Mexico. His coming to Bowdoin was the 
■ult of running into track coach Frank Sabasteanski 




■AMDS UP. 

rune. 



(U) 



In Ethiopian previnclAl 



in Mexico City in 1968. Girma was looking for a friend 
who was to tell him about possible American colleges for 
his education. 'Sabe^ told him about Bowdoin, and the 
rest is evident by his presence here. The following inter- 
view concerns his soccer exploits.) , 

ORIENT INTERVIEW BY BRIAN DAVIS 

Orient Sports Writer 

ORIENT: As- a participant in the 1968 Olympic Games 
In Mexico what were your impressions of the contests? 
ASHMERON : I enjoyed being there very much, especial- 
ly meeting the many different people that I did. I 
£,found the Mexican people to be very hospitable and I 

look forward to returning there some day. 
ORIENT: How were the Olympic contestants received? 
ASHMERON: Very well. For example, if any player 
I wanted to go into the city but did not want to wait 
||for the free village bus service, he could hitchhike 
■■very easily. Often people would go as much as 40 miles 



out of their way to take a player where he wanted to 
go. Many people also invited players to their homes 
for dinner. 

ORIENT: Did the demonstrations by the Mexican stu- 
dents against the government affect the players? 

ASHMERON: No. We heard that the Olympic Village 
was to be bombed, but we realized this was false prop- 
aganda. The students were protesting against the gov- 
ernment, not the Olympics. We did see students fight 
with the police, but all the ones (students) we met 
were very friendly. 

ORIENT: Coming from an African nation, what was 
your reaction to the raised fist demonstration of the 
two American track medalists? 

ASHMERON: At first, we didn't know what they were 
doing. Everyone thought that it was a victory sign. 
Then, the next morning the newspapers explained the 
event. Although it was bad to demonstrate as they did, 
they still won and brought pride to America. I don't 
think they had to be expelled from the Olympic team. 
However, this all resulted from breaking the rule of 
never putting sports and politics together. 

ORIENT: Could you explain what goes into putting to- 
gether an Olympic team? 

ASHMERON: In our case, 22 players were chosen from 
the teams representing each of Ethiopia's 13 provinces, 
meaning the consideration of about 6,000 players. Af- 
ter school recessed in the summer, we stayed together 
for a month in a hotel, primarily for training purposes, 
with practices twice a week. 

After we reached Mexico, we stayed in the Olympic 
Village, where all the national teams and staffs re- 
side. This village, specially^ prepared for the 1968 Olym- 
pics, had swimming pools, all types of fields and courts, 
restaurants, and an International club which .housed 
all types of indoor recreation. Every day of the month 
we stayed there, about 10,000 people toured the village. 

ORIENT: How did the Ethiopian team play? 

ASHMERON: We competed with six nations and were 
eliminated in the quarter finals.. We won two, lost 
three, and tied one. 

ORIENT: Did the high altitude of Mexico City affect 
your team? 

ASHMERON: No, the altitude of Mexico'City is about 
7800 feet, while that of Ethiopia's is about 8200. In 
fact, the Italian teams practiced in my country before 
going to the Olympics. 

ORIENT: Did you find the International (Olympic) 
style of soccer much different from that which you 
play in Ethiopia? 

ASHMERON: No Ethiopian soccer styles are very simi- 
lar to Brazilian or International ones. Besides, an 
Ethiopian referee was responsible for organizing the 
officials at the Olympic soccer games. 

ORIENT: How would you best describe the differences 
between the American style of soccer and the Inter- 
national one? 

ASHMERON: In International games, the players take 
more time. They don't charge as American players do 
— they think about the ball and the opposing player. 
This is because in International soccer, the players do 
not move in a direction as the Americans do. Instead, 
they move to a position — players constantly exchange 
positions. For this reason, passes must be more accu- 
rate. This is why in International soccer, the assist is 
regarded more highly than the actual goal. Also in 
International soccer, the referee runs with the action. 



Another difference lies in time and substitutions. In 
America you have quarters and unlimited subbing 
while in the International game you have two-45 min- 
ute halves with only two substitutions allowed for the 
entire game. Most International clubs have a seven 
month season, considerably longer than the American 
one. 

ORIENT: In International soccer, do you use specific 
plays and formations? 

ASHMERON: Yes. The job of the coach is to know all 
the methods, study the opposing teams, and then select 
a method that would be most effective against that 
particular opposing team. The team then practices the 
selected method. 

ORIENT: What is your opinion of American college 
soccer? 

ASHMERON: I will say that American college soccer 
is very interesting and progressive in comparison with 
the national sport here. Even though the skill and typie 
of play is different in America, the preparation of your 




NATIONAL DRESS ... of Ethiopia at the 1968 Olympic 
Games. Ashmeron is second from left. 

players and the organization involved is equivalent to 
those of any international team. As for equipment and 
facilities, they are among the best I have seen. For 
example, except for the lack of stadium seating, I 
would say that Bowdoin's field is equivalent to the one 
in Mexico used for the Olympic games. Also, the play- 
ers here are very eager. They are always on time and 
go to double sessions. In Ethiopia, the players com- 
plain when they have to practice more than twice a 
week. Because of this eagerness, I think America will 
have somcof the best soccer teams in the future. 

ORIENT: Were you disappointed when you arrived at 
Bowdoin and found out you would have to play on a 
freshman level? 

ASHMERON: No. I was not disappointed because I 
knew that the rule existed before I came here. I was 
eager to-play.for the varsity, and anxiously look for- 
ward to competing with them next season. 



SCHEDULE 

VARSITY SOCCER 



► # « • 



Oct 


18 


Williams 


A 1:00 


Oct 


22 


Bates 


A 2:80 


Oct. 


25 


Colby 


H 10:00 




28 


Maine 


A 1:80 


^r v ' 


1 


Bates 


H 10:00 


^Bv. 


6 


Colby 


A 1:30 






22i 



fn-Sat 

[Sun 

MO f M 



UMBERLAND 729 

tre 0239 



UiliL 



AN EVENING WITH 

W.C. 
FIELDS 

"Tillie & Gut" plut 

"The Old Fo»hion»d 
Way" 





I KIDS MAT INK 

^tV*^ 



"Africa Tmoi Styla" 
phnCAaTOONi 



SPECIAL SHOWS COLUMBUS DAY 

Martin** - 1-00 ■ m 

"AFWCA. TEXAS STYLE" 

tw iwpi - 7 M p.m. 

W. C. FIELDS "T1UIE « GUS" plwt 

"THE CH.D-F ASHrONEO WAV" 

(MONDAVI 






At - *irgf 



SCHEDULE 

VARSITY CROSS CO UN TRY 

Coach: Frank F. Sabasteanski 

Captain: Kenneth A. Cuneo 

Oct. IH Williams A 12:30 

Oct. 26 Colby H>12:30 

Oct. 28 MIAA Championships 

at Colby — - — -&m~ 

Oct. 31 Easterns 

Nov. 4 Bates H 3:30 

Nov. 7 Vermont . A 11:00 

Nov. 10 NEICAAA at .Boston 
FRESHMAN SOCCER 
Coach: Ray S. Bicknell • 
Oct. 15 Exeter A 3:00 

Oct. 17 Hinckley H 2:30 

Oct. 24 Colby - H 2:30 

Oct. 31 New Hampshire . H 2:00 



Sailors Use 
New Boats 

(continued from page 8) 

U Maine in competition against 
Maine, Dartmouth, Colby, and 
UNH. The varsity compete in a 
duodecagonal Saturday at Tufts 
while the frosh travel to Yale the 



ky Dcvc 8p«rlLnc 



"// is thought that they (the students) expend a great deal of 
animal energy which might otherwise bring them into serious 
collision with the laws of the college. ' 

. . . report of the Governing BoarcbyA 86 1 



following day for competition in 
a similar contest. Saturday's con- 
test starts at 12:30 while Sunday 
sees an early morning start at 
9:30. 

This year marks the first time 
the school has provided sailing 
instruction during cal classes. 
Owing to this policy change, 
there are presently 50 students 
involved with sailing, a marked 
increase over the 17 sailors of 
last year. 



PAGE EICHT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1969 



New Facilities, Boats, And 
Frosh Set Sailors On Course 

BY BENJAMIN BRADFORD WHITCOMB IH 

Orient Sports Writer 

After an interview with Polar Bear sailing Commodore Bob 

Vaughan, "it is obvious that sailing team prospects are at last 

really looking up, and that Bowdoin College itself has finally 

taken notice of its sailing potential." The team now not only 

has a promising young team, but 



Polar Bearings 



Football 



Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 



17 
10 



1-1 



WPI 

Wesleyan 



21 



at Amherst Saturday 2:00 
Bowdoin Fr. Worcester 

0-1 
at Vermont Academy Saturday 2:00 



Soccer 



photo hy Davt Sperling 

THE BEAR FACTS . • . don't daunt recently inaugurated President Howell who offers a protective body to 
Trish Luther as Bowdoin cheerleader (male) Hal Stevens gapes on. Trish, along with a second interchange 
coed, Sue Alvano, joined Bowdoin's previously all-male cheerleading squad in attempts at getting the 3500 
homecoming fans moving. The cheers seem to have worked quite well on the Bowdoin mascot, although his 
reaction was not one 'which entirely comforted everyone. Other gametime antics included a performance on 
the field by the Bowdoin marching band, rumored to be the first time such a liberal interpretation of the Pierce 
Committee report was offered to the public. 

Bears Duel Lord Jeffs: 
Look To Break 1-1 Record 

By CHRIS PIERCE 
For the Orient 

The varsity gridders were effectively held down by a strong Wesleyan defense last Satur- 
day in a disappointing 21-10 loss. The varsity travels to Amherst tomorrow to face one of the 
stronger small college teams in New England 
The Lord Jeffs are presently 



Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 



Springfield 
UNH 
Wesleyan 
Maine 



1-3 



at Amherst Saturday 1:00 
Bowdoin Fr. 7 • N. Yarmouth 

Bowdoin Fr. 4 Maine 

2-0 
vs Hebron 3:00 



Cross Country 



Bowdoin 



22 



1-0 



St. Anselms 



at Amherst Saturday 1 1 :30 
Bowdoin Fr. 22 MCI 

1-0 
at Morse Tuesday 



32 



3« 



Sailing 



Varsity at Tufts Saturday 12:30 
Frosh at Yale Sunday 9:30 



VARSITY FOOTBALL 

Oct. 18 Williams A 2:00 

Oct. 25 tColby H 1:30 

Nov. 1 Bates H 1:30 

Nov. 8 Tufta> A 1:30 



t Parents Weekend 



rated fourth in competition for 
the Lambert Cup, as well as en- 
joying a similar position in the 
UPI rating of New England Col- 
lege elevens. Returning Amherst 
quarterback Jeff Kehoe is enjoy- 
ing another highly successful sea- 
son, having already led victories 
over perenially powerful Spring- 
field and less powerful AIC. Kick- 
off is at 2:00 on Amherst's Pratt 
field. 

Wesleyan's opportunist Cardi- 
nals denied Bowdoin her bid for a 
second consecutive win last Sat- 
urday with a 21-10 victory in 
which the Polar Bears failed to 
capitalize on a number of excel- 
lent scoring opportunities. 

Bowdoin broke the scoring ice 
before a homecoming crowd of 
over 3500 when John Pappalardo 
recovered a Wesleyan fumble on 
their 22 yard line in the first pe- 
riod. The Bears reached the one 
yard line, but were set back by a 
penalty and forced to settle for a 
25 yard field goal by Captain 
John Delahanty. 

Numerically, the Cardinals won 
the game with 14 second-period 
points. Quarterback Pete Panci- 
era, who threw four touchdown 
passes against Bowdoin last year, 
sent Fullback Dave Revenaugh 
on a 39 yard draw play. Later in 
the same period Revenaugh 
bucked over from the one to com- 
plete a 47 yard drive. 

Bowdoin dominated all but the 
tall end of the second half, but 
still could not put the ball into 
the end zone. They twice reached 
the one but were stopped, al- 
though John Demenkoff followed 
some fancy footwork with a pow- 
er lunge through the center for a 
six yard touchdown with 3:08 to 
go in the third quarter, narrow- 
ing the margin to 14-10. Bowdoin 
had a golden opportunity to win 
the game with a first down at 
Wesleyan's 29, but Guy Forbes 
intercepted a John Benson pass 
and crushed Bowdoin's hopes by 
setting up a series of passes 
which were to take the Cardinals 
into the Bear end zone for the fi- 
nal score of the game. 



Wesleyan 
Bowdoin 




3 



14 

7 








7 




Booters Set 

Back Maine; 

Amherst Next 

BY 

MICHIEL ADRIAASZOON 

DE RUYTER 

Orient Sports Writer 

The varsity booters broke out 
of a three game losing streak last 
Tuesday by defeating U Maine, 
4-1. The previous Sunday, the 
Bears came back from a Satur- 
day 1-0 loss to Wesleyan by de- 
feating a French Naval Team, 
7-6. Tomorrow the squad travels 
to Amherst for competition. 

An aggressive Bear squad dom- 
inated play in last Tuesday's 
match. Rick Wilson started the 
scoring by outracing his defense- 
man and landing a shot in the up- 
per right hand corner of the net. 
It was Tom Huleat's chance next 
as he shot from 30 yards down- 
field and caught the corner of the 
net. Lee Rowe rounded out the 
Bowdoin scoring by booting in 
two more goals. 

Last Sunday Bowdoin enter- 
tained a visiting soccer team 
from a French naval ship on 
leave in Portsmouth, N.H. The 
Bowdoin star-studded squad in- 
cluded Ethiopian Olympic player 
Girma Ashmeron, Dutch cham- 
pionship players George Taylor 
and Jerry Booy, varsity coach 
Charlie Butt, frosh coach Ray 
Bicknell, professors Stoddard and 
Holmes, and varsity player John 
Phillipsbourne. The international 
trio of Ashmeron, Taylor, and 
Booy accounted for all of the 
American goals, six claimed by 
Ashmeron, and one by Booy. 
Charlie Butt turned in an impres- 
sive performance for the Bow- 
doin squad. Cross passing and 
free spotting characterized the 
European style of play seen on 
the field. 

When the Bears travel to Am- 
herst Saturday, they should ex- 
pect to encounter a strong Lord 
Jeff squad which boasts an excep- 
tionally strong left inside. 




hy Dare B ae rHa g 

HEADS UP . . . soccer characterizes new Booter play. The Bears travel 
to Amherst for competition tomorrow. (See article this page and page 7.) 



It's getting to the point where I'm no fun anymore 

i am sorry. 
Sometimes it hurts so badly I must cry out loud 

i am lonely. 
I am yours, you are mine, you are what you are, 

and you make it hard— 
. . . Stephen Stills 



new boats with new docking fa- 
cilities and a sailing instruction 
program. 

From money donated by a few 
alumni, the team has purchased 
eight new fiberglass sloop-rigged 
dinghies to replace the tired Tech 
tubs which have been used for 
the past 15 years. To accommo- 
date the new vessels, new ramps 
have been constructed and an ex- 
tended dock is in the making so 
that all the dinghies can be tied 
up at once, ready to go simulta- 
neously. One item which is still 
sorely needed, however, is either 
a new "crash" boat to rescue 
stranded learners, or a high ca- 
pacity bilge pump to keep the 
present boat afloat. The commo- 
dore and his team admit that the 
boat will do in a pinch, but are 
seeking help from anyone who 
might care to offer it. 

Returning this year to the rac- 
ing scene are rear commodore 
Steve Glinick, senior Tom Berry 
(back from a year in France), 
junior Benjy Whitcomb, and a 
collection of promising sopho- 
mores, among them Dave Potter, 
George Marvin, and Andy 
Reicher. The team's real 
strength, however, lies in the 
frosh with Steve Andon and Bill 
Loring having national competi- 
tion behind them. Pete Chandler 
finishes out the strong frosh trio. 

The season's initial competi- 
tion placed the sailors fourth at 

(Continued on page 7) 

Harriers To 
Meet Lord 
Jeffs Sat. 

Coach Frank Sabasteanski's 
varsity cross country squad 
• oened its season with a 32-23 
Alumni day victory over St. An- 
selm's last Saturday. Captain 
Ken Cuneo and his brother, Mark, 
were tied for first place with a 
time of 19:20.7. 

Other Bowdoin finishers in 
Saturday's contest included Mil- 
ton Seekins (fourth), Steve Mo- 
riarty (seventh), Bruce Murphy 
(ninth), Steve Holmes (elev- 
enth), Bob Bassett (twelfth), and 
Miles Coverdale (fifteenth). 

The eleven-man varsity has 
only two returning* lettermen, but 
that doesn't detract from the 
quad's potential. Nearly all were 
on the course last season for the 
team's 3-3 competition record. 
Coverdale was a member of last 
year's record-setting one mile in- 
door and outdoor relay teams. 
The Cuneo brothers, between 
them, hold five individual college 
records. Holmes was honorary 
captain of last year's frosh squad. 

The freshmen opened their sea- 
son last Wednesday with a 36-22 
victory over St. Anselm's. They 
continue their schedule next week 
against Morse and Waterville. 
The varsity travel to Amherst -~ — ~ 
Saturday for competition there. 



Running Somewhere? 

. . . tell everyone by 
writing about it in 
the Orient 

We want Cross Country 
runner-writers ! 

coated Martin Fried lander 
9-9445 or ext. 300 



THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly ih the UniUd SUtes 



VOLUME XCIX 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1969 



NUMBER 3 



Moratorium Quiet at Bowdoin 
Few Students Attend Events 



By FRED CUSICK 

xThis is the patent age of new in- 
ventions 
For killing: bodies, and for 
saving souls, 
All propogated with the best in- 
tentions. 

Byron 
There was an air of bogus sol- 
emnity about the events which 
marked the Oct. 15 moratorium 
at Bowdoin. Several times dur- 
ing the day some clergyman was 
called upon to utter the appropri- 
ate words. "Moments of medita- 
tion" were frequent, although 
not as frequent as statements 
that "the war is immoral." The 
candlelight gathering on the 
mall became a kind of revival 
meeting for intellectuals com- 
plete with folk songs, black arm 
bands, and individual speakers, 
e.g. Rollin Ives, exhibiting their 
consciences in public. It was all 
very "symbolical," very "mov- 
ing," and, from the political 
standpoint, very ineffective. 

The day's events began in the 
morning with a half filled chapel 
forum on the war. President 
Howell, Deans: Greason and Ny- 
hus, several professors, and 
about 160 students attended 
the forum. Professor Long de- 
livered the benediction: "Al- 
mighty God . . . hear this cry 
which rises from desperate men 
in a misguided world. . . . We are 



Faculty Makes 
SATs Optional 
For Admission 



By NORM CARET 

On Monday, October 13, it was 
decided by a majority vote of the 
faculty to make the College 
Board Aptitude and Achievement 
tests optional for future appli- 
cants to Bowdoin College. The 
proposal to make the boards op- 
tional was made at an earlier 
faculty meeting by Richard W. 
Moll, Bowdoin's Director of Ad- 
missions. Mr. Moll had at that 
time stated that the proposal, if 
it went into effect, should be 
adopted on a two year experi- 
mental basis. The proposal was 
given over to the Student-Faculty 
Committee on Admissions for 
Study, which in turn approved it 
and offered the slightly revised 
plan to be voted on at Monday's 
faculty meeting. The idea of the 
ruling's being on an experimental 
basis was dropped on the grounds 
that at any time, if the faculty 
so decided, their earlier decision 
could be revoked by another vote. 
The adopted motion will go into 
effect in time to benefit the class 
of 74. 

The decision to make the 
CEEB tests optional was not 
arrived at without a great deal 
of discussion and debate, both in 
the Committee and in the faculty 
meeting itself. Professor Edward 
J. Geary, chairman of Bowdoin's 
French department and a mem- 
ber of the committee, replied 
when asked about the proposal 
that it did not pass without the 
opposition of "a considerable mi- 
nority of the faculty." Not all 
those who were opposed to the 
idea of optional tests were con- 
vinced that it should remain on 
a mandatory basis. Some, like Mr. 
(Fleaae tun to page 4) 



at war with God and with each 
other. . . . Let us express revul- 
sion for the war not hatred for 
the men who are tainted as we 
are tainted. 

"We hear crys of Peace! 
Peace! when there is no peace. 

"The young men are consumed 
by fire." During the benediction 
and the meditation which follow- 
ed a large white dog (No doubt 
a peace symbol sent by the Al- 
mighty.) wandered up the aisle, 
sniffing at the silent people. Fi- 
nally, bored by their immobility, 
he climbed into a pew and went 
to sleep. The dog's boredom an- 
ticipated the boredom of the au- 
dience. With the exception of 
Professor Coursen, all of the 
speakers were either dull or in- 
audible. President Howell, Gea- 
ry and Nyhus, several professors, 



and about 50 students managed 
to slip out during the forum. 

Those who remained behind 
heard George Bowden '68 thun- 
der against the "inactivists" : "To 
be against the war in Vietnam 
and do nothing about it is inex- 
cusable!" 

Dean Nyhus delivered a short, 
inaudible address on the prob- 
lems that will face us after Viet- 
nam: "Our policy is, in Senator 
Fullbright's phrase, afflicted with 
the arrogance of power. . . . We 
pursue our national interest 
through war rather than through 
the traditional diplomatic meth- 
ods. 

"I would urge the movement 
which quite correctly concen- 
trates on Vietnam today to make 
this (The substitution of diplo- 
(Please turn to page 5) 



Maine Computer Hook-up 
To Transform Education 



By BOB NASH 

In 1964 Bowdoin purchased an 
IBM 1620 computer. In February 
of 1968 the college hooked up via 
teletype to the Dartmouth com- 
puter. Twenty months later Bow- 
doin's computing facilities are 
saturated. The administration 
uses the IBM over ninety per cent 
of the time, and the waiting peri- 
od for the Dartmouth teletype is 
two weeks. Thus, in February of 
1970 Bowdoin will acquire a half- 
million dollar computer, named 
the PDP-10. 

The capabilities of this com- 
puter are impressive; it should be 
able to handle Bowdoin's comput- 
ing needs for at least the next 
five years. First, the PDP-10 
operates on Basic, a language, 
that is far simpler to learn than 
Fortran which the IBM uses. Of- 
ten a beginner is able to write 




by M 



m. 



Professor William White.ide lead. * (roup discussion on the mall at last Wednesday'* Moratorium 
A candlelight ceremony was hold that evening on the mall, as part of the day's event, to examine the 
continuation of the war. 



Charges Brushed Aside 



SDS Criticizes Worker Exploitation 



By SAUL GREENFIELD 

Undoubtedly each of you has been handed a 
green leaflet in front of the Moulton Union put out 
by the S.D.S. The topics covered range from Ad- 
ministrative bribery to strike breaking, to subsis- 
tance pay. The question that arises is how much 
of what is said is fantasy or fact. 

In talking with John F. Brush, administrative 
head of Grounds and Buildings, many apparent dis- 
crepancies were uncovered. He considers the 
S.D.S. statement that "the Administration bought 
off the leader of the union drive by getting him a 
better job," "close to slandering the Administra- 
tion. For it is always our policy to upgrade from 
within rather than from outside." He was talking 
of Ralph Allen, who was promoted from Carpenter 
Foreman to Assistant to the Superintendent. Mr. 
Brush contends that the cc liege helped the union 
effort in every way possible, which included pro- 
viding Smith Auditorium as a meeting place. Mr. 
Brush expressed his belief that Allen is too honest 
to be bought off and that the opening above Mr. 
Allen was totally coincidental. After being asked 
why the union attempt fizzled after the promotion 
of Mr. Allen, Mr. Brush replied that, "perhaps 
there wasn't anyone else intelligent enough to as- 
sume leadership," and that, "the staff just lost in- 
terest." When Mr. Brush was asked why Allen 
didn't continue the union drive in his new position, 
he replied that, "Allen became part of manage- 
ment and management doesn't usually involve it- 
self in unionizing." 



The S.D.S. fact sheet continues and says that, 
"the college again displayed anti-union feelings 
when the Gordon Linen truck drivers were on 
strike. The sheet says that, "the Administration 
sent people to pick up the scab linen." Mr. Brush 
declared that he ordered the linen picked up be- 
cause he felt that it was his obligation to provide 
the linen service for the students. He also men- 
tioned that Bowdoin is one of Gordon's smallest ac- 
counts and that he felt that his actions could not 
make or break a strike at Gordon. 

In reply to the S.D.S. charge that, "Many jani- 
tors have to take two jobs to support their fam- 
ilies," Mr. Brush said that this is common to all 
custodial type labor throughout New England and 
that to have "new cars and Color I'.V." and fight 
against the rising cost of living this is necessary. 
The S.D.S. charged that, "Last summer, three 
workers were given 1 cent an hour raises." Mr. 
Brush explained that this year the college started 
giving raises in 5 cent increments, as opposed to 
the previous 4 cent increment. To make sure that 
all future salaries would be even to the nickel the 
college-adjusted salaries from say, $1.84 to $1.86. 
These raises would not have occurred had there 
not been the new 5 cent interval. Mr. Brush also 
mentioned that a notice was posted to this effect 
but that employees "read what they want to read" 
and they thought the adjustments were raises. In 
addition, the three workers involved were not due 
for raises. 

(Please tan to page S) 



programs for significant problems 
after only a few hours study of 
the Basic language. 

Although the PDP-10 is no 
larger than the IBM, It computes 
one thousand times as quickly. 
The administrative programs that 
presently tie up the D3M for 
many hours will be done by the 
PDP in less than a minute. 

Its speed makes possible the 
time sharing system whereby one 
computer can have many users 
at the same time. Since it takes 
far longer to submit a program to 
the computer than it takes for 
the computer to solve the prob- 
lem, many users at different tele- 
types can all be typing their pro- 
grams into the computer at the 
same time. As each person fin- 
ishes entering his program, the 
computer performs the calcula- 
tions, returns the answers, and 
awaits the next completed pro- 
gram; 

The time sharing system will 
offer many advantages to Bow- 
doin. Not only .will teletypes be 
placed in many buildings around 
campus, but they will also be 
located in colleges, high schools, 
and institutions throughout the 
state. Thus, Bowdoin will be able 
to sell computing time, and the 
money received will pay for the 
entire cost of the computer. 

But more important are the 
educational advantages of the 
time sharing system. For ex- 
ample, a person at any teletype 
will have access to all programs 
in the computer's memory. A 
program might be devised that 
would ask the student questions 
and then check his answers. A 
well-written program would teach 
those parts of a course that re- 
quire rote learning and might be 
used by every college or high 
school that had a teletype to sup- 
plement classroom activities. This 
sharing of programs might well 
lead to new developments in edu- 
cational technology, and may help 
to intergrate and standardize the 
school systems throughout Maine. 
-According to Myron W. Curtis, 
Director of the Computing Cen- 
ter, Bowdoin has administrative, 
educational, and research uses 
for a modern computer. Bow- 
doin's present IBM is too slow 
and lacks the memory space to 
perform computations for most 
research. Mr. Curtis said that the 
PDP will have the capabilities 
for research like computers found 
at large universities and should 
thus attract research professors. 

Also, as high school students 
become more ' adept at using a 
computer, the computing facili- 
ties of schools may determine 
their choice of a college. The 
PDP will allow Bowdoin to com- 
pete more effectively for talented 
freshmen. 

The PDP will also permit Bow- 
doin to institute a graduate pro- 
gram in applied computer science. 
With help from readily available 
government and private grants, 
Bowdoin may be the first small, 
liberal arts college to offer such 
a program. 

If, as Mr. Curtis expects, a to- 
tal of twenty secondary schools, 
colleges, and private institutions 
purchase computing time from 
the PDP, Bowdoin will make a 
profit of over ten thousand dol- 
lars per month. The educational 
advantages, (he gains in prestige, 
and the economic bonus offered 
by the PDP-10 indicate that Bow- 
doin is again assuming a leader's 
role among small, liberal arts col- 

■sktfyAet 






PAGE TWO, 



t 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1969 



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Western Electric 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17. 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE THREE 



Faculty Petitions Nixon 
For Speedy End of War 



SDS Deplores Workers' Treatment 

.- * (Continued from page 1) 



By JEFF DRUMMOND 

For the past two weeks Her- 
bert Coursen has been gathering 
signatures for his petition pro- 
testing both the President's stand 
on th£ war in Vietnam and his 
stand on the protest of the peo- 
ple. Nixon's stand on protest is 
particularly questionable in light 
of the democratic theory that he 
is only the servant of the people. 
Coursen's letter criticizes this 
stand : 

Dear Mr. President: 

We, members of the Bowdoin Col- 
lege faculty and administration, urge 
you to reconsider your recent state- 
ment that you will not be affected by 
the forthcoming moratorium proposed 
for October 15th. If you mean by that 
statement that you, will not be affected 
by further public disapproval of the 
Vietnam War, we take strong issue 
with the statement and with you. We 
feel that peaceful protest, such as 
planned for October 15th, is one of 
the few ways that members of a de- 
mocracy in a non-election year can 
make their voices heard. 

For you to announce in advance 
that your decisions will not be respon- 
sive to the voices of your fellow citi- 
zens is, we believe, profoundly con- 
trary to democratic principles. 

Wi believe that further hesitation 
with respect to Americas withdrawal 
from Vietnam is unwise. You yourself 
-have said that America no longer seeks 
victory but rather time to achieve an 
honorable peace. The events of recent 
months, houever. suggest that time is 
not on our side, and that further de- 
lays may only raise the number of 
American casualties without in any 
way forwarding the cause of peace. 

We urge you to withdraw all 
American troops from Vietnam. We 
urge you further to keep lines of com- 
munication open between the .Presi- 
dent and the people he leads. To over- 
look the significance and intent of the 
October 15th moratorium is to deny 
the reality of public disaffection with 
the war. 

The letter was signed by the 
following members of the Bow- 
doin community: Allen, Beam, 
Beckwlth, Bland, Bohan, Brooks, 
Burroughs, Butcher, Carriere, 
Chittim, Cornell, Coursen, Coxe, 
Darling, Derbyshire. 

Dietrich, Fuchs, Geary, Grobe, 
Guest, Gustafson, Hall, Hanis, 
Hannaford, Helmreich, Holmes 



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(CT), Holmes (DN), Hopkins, 
Hornby, Huntington. 

Hyams, Ikeler, Ireland, Long, 
McGee, McKee ; Mathis, Minister, 
Mrs. Minister, Moll, Nunn, 
O'Hern, Paluska, Pojs, Redwine. 
Resenbrink, Rittle, Rossides, 
' Rubin, Schwartz, Shipman, Sil- 
berger, Snider, Springsteel, Stod- 
dard, Streetman, Taylor (AM), 
Volz, Ward, Warshaw, Weissman, 
West. 

The only disappointing part of 
the petition was that no members 
of the Administration had signed. 
Their excuse that any signatures 
would indicate support of the Col- 
lege through support of the Ad- 
ministration unfortunately, how- 
ever, is logical. It was a great re- 
lief, though, to find a second pe- 
tition,, circulated by Professor 
Whiteside: 

"We the undersigned, as private cit- 
izens, urge our fellow residents of 
Brunswick and Topsham to participate 
in a day of examination of the war in 
Vietnam on October 15. We ask all 
who take part in public gatherings on 
that day to discuss and listen in a 
spirit of tolerance, 

"It is our conviction that the present 
course of American policy in Viet- 
nam cannot continue. The destruction 
to life and land in Vietnam coupled 
with the now nearly unbearable pres- 
sure that this war forces on our own 
society must come to an end. „ 

"We have no illusions that a with- 
drawal of American troops will sud- 
denly solve all of the problems of 
Vietnam. After such an action our 
Government together with Asian Gov- 
ernments will have to search far ans- 
wers to hard questions. Bui We think 
Vietnamese and American soldiers, in 
the search for solutions to the prob- 
lems of Southeast Asia. 

"Finally, we urge President Nixon 
to respond to expressions of public 
opinion regarding the war. We believe 
that American forces should be with- 
drawn now." 

The letter was signed by Abe- 
Ion, Arms, Born, Douglas, Grea- 
son, Nyhus, Richards, Streetman, 
Whiteside, and O'Hern as private 
citizens of Brunswick, thereby re- 
leasing them from committing 
their respective administrative 
posts. , 

(Please turn to page 4) 



-"This reporter spoke to a representative of the 
S.D.S., Dave Gordon, to try to clarify these rather 
confused issues. Mr. Gordon said that even in the 
light of Mr. Brush's statements he still felt that 
Mr. Allen was bought off. He contends that if 
Allen were sincere he wouldn't have taken the bet- 
ter job but stayed back and organize the union. He 
claims that Allen "blew their (the workers) trust." 

In reference to the Gordon truck driver strike he 
said that, "although it may have been the Adminis- 
tration's responsibility to get the linen, it was 
wrong to do so." He mentioned the Harvard 
S.D.S.'s success in preventing linen deliveries at 
that school. The Harvard S.D.S. and some drivers 
overturned the truck with the scab linen. Mr. Gor- 
don said that if such a strike were to once again 
occur, the S.D.S. would "organize against it." 

In reply to the question of the 1 cent adjust- 
ment, Mr. Gordon said that he was under the im- 
pression that the workers considered this a raise. 
In addition, he mentioned that, "possibly, putting 
that on the sheet was a mistake but we are not in- 
fallible." It was brought to Mr. Gordon's atten- 
tion that present salary levels were the area aver- 
age and that janitors all over New England took 
two jobs. He replied that "Just because it's bad all 
over doesn't mean it's justified." After being asked 
where the money would come from for general 
salary increases he sr. : d, "That's one thing we 



The sheet went on to point out that student 
wages were rather low. Mr. Brush replied that, 
"Part time help is part time help," and as far as 
any employer is concerned, part time help does not 
receive full time wages. 

Mr. Brush believes that there are many fringe 
benefit advantages to working at Bowdoin such a.-- 
the atmosphere, the use of the pool and library and 
a scholarship program that provides free tuition to 
the children of staff members who go to any col- 
lege in the United States or Canada. He did, how 
ever, state that "not many staff members produce 
children intelligent enough to take advantage of 
the program." As far as wages. are concerned Mr. 
Brush stated that Bowdoin pays salaries .comen- 
surate with the average salary paid by any em- 
ployer in the Brunswick area. 

The S.D.S. sheet goes on to say that, "the library 
starting pay for full time workers is $62," and that 
"One woman has worked for the college for 20 
years and gets less than $90 a week: Another 
woman has to support five children on $68 a week." 
Arthur Monke, College Librarian, said that, "Al- 
though we do not divulge salary figures, the sheet's 
figures are correct." He said that the college can- 
not afford to pay more. To do so the library wouk! 
have to fire four people and run a "sweat shop or 
not get the work, done." He believes that the li- 
brary is "caught in a trap financially." 



(1.) All students inter- 
ested in serving on the 
Alumni Council should get 
their name to a Council 
member by Monday eve- 
ning. Student members of 
the Alumni Council will 
have a vote and will serve 
on the Council-at large "as 
well as on committees of 
the Council. 

(2. ) The Council Com- 
mit tee on Committees will 
have a meeting to select 
student membership for the 
committees below on next 
Wednesday evening at 7:00 
p.m. • . 

Committee on Govern- 
ance (3 students) ■ 
Committee on the Sum- 
mer Use of Pickard 
Theater (2) 
| Boards Committee on 
Student Environment 
• (1) 



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deadline for applications is 
October 24. Applications 
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Mr. Roberts will be in 
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PAGE FOUR 



THE BO> 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17 



I96< 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Volume XC1X 



Friday, October 17, 1969 



Number 3 



SDS Reports 



This week saw the publication of two pamphlets by the SDS 
— one issued from Boston concerning the Moratorium and the 
other written by Bowdoin students on the College's treatment 
of its employees. * 

The "Bowdoin As Boss'* paper is, unfortunately, a thought- 
less, ill-researched propaganda piece which reveals SDS's ina 
bihty to put facts before doctrine. The paper tries so hard to 
show the College treats its employees abominably that it ob- 
scures the question of what can be done to improve the situa- 
tion. The writers make no distinction between honest griev- 
ances and misunderstandings, such as that over the one cent pay 
increment, and they made no attempt to confront those they 
accuse of being "bought off" and having no concern for the 
workers to determine the truth of their charges. Finally, the 
paper makes no attempt to suggest how real grievances can be 
met. 

It appears to have been an attempt to get student support by 
appealing to emotions, but it may well lose support for SDS 
when people become aware of its inaccuracies. . 

On the other hand, the paper from Boston revealed greater 
insight into the nature of the Moratorium than most people 
showed.- Though we do not think the Moratorium was a plot to 
take our attention from the real methods of ending the war, we 
do agree that it was a wasted effort will bring no results of any 
sort. 

The Moratorium was designed as ah opportunity for all 
people who desire an end to the war to express their opposition 
and discuss the issues the war and withdrawal from it raise. It 
Was to be both educational and political. 

Educationally it was a failure. The opportunity to use the 
, war to educate Americans about the realities of this country has 
been ignored. Cur hour speeches in high schools by opponents 
of the war do not teach anybody anything. But education is 
exactly what is necessary to begin to eliminate those conditions 
of American society which gave rise to the war. 

Politically the Moratorium was a failure. Any success it may 
have had results from Nixon's incredibly stupid remark that he 
would pay no attention to it. In order to gain mass support the 
Moratorium had to refrain from taking any specific position on 
withdrawal or negotiati >ns. but this means that the goals of the 
Moratorium and those of Nixon really do not conflict. Had 
Nixon been better informed and less irrational, he might well 
have turned it to his own purposes by claiming it showed how 
sincere the American desire for peace is, thus forcing Hanoi to 
take responsibility for continuation of the war. 

The Moratorium proved very little because nobody can tell 
exactly what the participation signified, whether simple desire 
, for peace or demand for immediate withdrawal. 

Of course, the Moratorium did not do any harm. But it is a 
mistake to think that this sort of mass expression of opinion is 
the best way to get us out of Viet-nam. 

College Boards Optional 

. -(Continued from pane t) — 



Barry L. Lively, Assistant Pro- 
lessor in the psychology depart- 
ment, thought the college should 
"go all the way," either keeping 
the boards mandatory or drop- 
ping them altogether. 

In the faculty debate, a num- 
ber of relevant arguments' were 
expressed en both sides of the 
issue. Those in favor of the op- 
tional status claimed that they 
expected a great majority of ap- 
plicants to report their scores 
despite it's being optional. Their 
major concern was not with these 
people, but rather with those who 
would make excellent Bowdoin 
students, but who for some rea- 
son don't fit into the testing pat- 
tern. Another reason for doing 
away with the requirement was 
a realization that college l>oards 
are over-emphasized in the ad- 
missions procedure by lx)th sec- 
ondary schools and parents. Some 
saw no correlation between the 
board scores and a student's per- 
formance in college, stating that 
a student's worth should not be 
evaluated by how he performs on 
a "very inadequate measure" of 
his ability.- Proponents of the pro- 
posal stated that what is shown 
in the boards can be found in 
many other more meaningful rec- 
ords interviews, recommenda- 
tions, grade transcripts;- and the 
application itself. They claim that 
this new attitude about the boards 
will attract the individualistic 
student and give a more personal 
tone to the admissions process 
that is found so lacking in the 
College Board arrangement. This 



new outlook, it is also lio|>cd, will 
serve as an example, and that 
ether colleges will follow suit. 

Those opposed to the pvdixwnl 
admitted that too much emphasis 
w;as placed on a student's score, 
to the extent that in some sec- 
ondary schools his whole curricu- 
lum was gea red towards the SAT 
and Achievement Tests. They ar- 
gued., however, that taking the 
freshmen class as a whole, there 
was a very close correlation be- 
tween scores and later i>erfor- 
mance in college. The individual 
student, they said, would be con- 
sidered in the light of many far- 
ters, his college board score bein^ 
a small part of his profile. A low 
score, in other words, could be 
countered by high performance, 
and would often be l«n:ked upon 
as a "lower bound" with' which 
to gauge his capability Thus the 
board score, as Professor Lively 
put it, could have "onl> a salua- 
U.rv effect" on an applicant's 
chances for admission. The oppo- 
sition to the proposal therefore 
asserted that the SAT. when 
properly read, had a "valid func- 
tion" in admissions, and though a 
fallible measure, like anything 
else, of a student's worth, it was 
still "one of the better predic- 
tors" of an applicant's later per- 
formance. 

Though the decision has been 
made, many faculty members 
feel that the issue is not really 
over yet. As one rather dubious 
faculty man put it, "I guess we'll 
just have to wait and see." 



Pierce Replies 



Dear Sirs: 

' Those of us who served on the Study Committee 
on I'ndeivlass Canlpus Environment had hoped that 
our report would provoke controversy. Until I saw 
your editorial in the Orient for October'*, 1969, I 
had been disappointed. We now have a controver- 
sy. Cood. I hope your editorial will stimulate 
people to read and debate the report. 

However, I was sorry that your editorial ignored 
our affirmative lecommendations. Instead, you 
seem to have tried to leave the impression that we 
straddled issues and made no recommendations, and 
that we put our iepci\ together on a pretty slap- 
dash basis. 

In fact,, we recommended: 

The continuation of fraternities at Bowdoin pro- 
vided they can remain strong; 

The closing cf fraternities in which the living 
arrangements become such as to cause prolonged 
stress and distraction or if it appears t'lat minimum 
standards are no;- me' for health and safety; 

That the College, accordingly, establish a peri- 
odic physical inspection of the fraternities and 
periodically examine their economic affairs; 

The provision by the College of a competitive al- 
ternative to fraternities; 

That the students themselvc, should determine 
die evolution of tile system within the framework 
of the College; 

Possible uses to be made -of ' those fraternity- 
houses that might be closed; 

That "orientation" as "hazing" is now called has 
;■. > place among undergraduates today; 

That the s'ze of the College be increased from 
.".00 tofiOOf 

That Bowdoin abandon its long-standing tradi- 
tion as an all-male college and offer a high-quality 
education to members of the other half of the stu- 
<!en' population "whose members' are just as much 
c i i le 1 to. and US interested in, a superior edu- 
c i ij>isaic the'r brothers"; 

/fii:c:isNJ contacts between the Govern ng 
1? urds ahdShe faculty and students through pro- 
grams which \4V_e_ recommended and which the 
Boards decided to put into effect. 

In one respect, the implication of your first few 
paragraphs is correct. We did not make specific 
recommendations, as to hew to increase contacts 
between undergraduates and faculty. This was a 
matter which we considered and discussed at 
length, but to which we- were unable to find a so- 
lution. 

The fright you express at the thought that the 
report, has been "approved" by the Governing 
Hards is not entirely well founded. It was "ac- 

Time For Examination 
Of College's Functions 



For Letters To The Editor, Write : 
EDITOR 
THE ORIENT 
Moulton Union 
Campus 



cepted." Our recommendations will ha*ve to be 
proved specifically by the Governing Boards befor* 
they are put into effect, hence our desire that th° 
recommendations be the subject of informed nu u 
lie debate. 

As to coeducation, you wonder whether we wer' 
merely rationalizing our prejudices in favor of co- 
education. The fact is that several members of our 
Committee were initially strongly opposed to co- 
education, but after our long discussions with 
members cf the faculty and students, our visits u 
other colleges, and careful study of reports on and 
studies of the subject, all but one of us concluded 
that coeducation in some form was desirable for 
Bowdoin. • 

You stale "the arguments against coeducation 
are much stronger than the report suggests." ft 
is true that we were not convinced by the argu- 
"C^ments which we listed. Nor were we convinced by 
the dissenting view of our errant member which 
is attached as Schedule B to the report. 

It is always difficult to find arguments in' favor 
of something you don't believe in, but I don't think 
that the arguments which you suggest are very 
gocd either. "First, it is the case that women often 
drop their fields after marriage." Isn't this another 
way of saying that women's intellectual activities 
should be confined to the kitchen, the nursery and 
the bedroom? "Secondly, there may be more evi- 
dence than the committee admits that there is still 
a strong demand for all men schools." To this. I 
can only say that we tried in every way we could' 
think bf to get undergraduates, faculty and alumni 
to discuss their ideas with us, and we read a grea; 
deal of the pertinent literature (see Annex A to 
the report). We found nothing any more persua- 
sive than we have indicated. Perhaps this "argu- 
ment" is best an.-wered by the quotation from 
Jencks and Riesman appearing in footnote No. 12 
to the report. "Thirdly, a good argument can be 
made for considering the college years a time for 
young people to retreat from the world to discover 
themselves and learn about the world without hav- 
ing it forced upon them." If this argument really 
can be made seriously, does it follow^that the re- 
treat should be to a monastery? Are "women" arid 
"world" synonymous? 

I join with you in hoping that serious debate 
an<: examination of the report will now take place. 

Yours very trulv, 
WILLIAM C. PIKRCK 



By JOHN WEISS 

A period of change has arrived 
at Bowdoin in the last few years. 
A faculty, administration, and 
irovoining boards more amenable 
to innovation have started pro- 
grams which have already strong- 
ly affected the undergraduate en- 
vironment. Among the more 
prominent plans for the future 
are c; education, graduate pro- 
grams, aid new types of college 
housing. Chairs in Kuturistics 
and Kthnic studies have been 
suggested by President Howell. 

All of these changes raise the 
question of the function and fu- 
ture of the Liberal Arts College: 
What is its purpose? Can it or. 
indeed, should it attempt to pre- 
serve its traditional purposes? 

The section titled 'Bowdoin: A 
Liberal College" in the College 
Mullet ,n states the objectives of 
Bowdoin. President Joseph Mc- 
Keen's remark that "literary in- 
stiiu.ions are founded and en- 
dowed for the common good, and 
rot for the private advantage of 
those who resort to them. It is 
no; that they may be able to pajss 
-through life in an easy or repijt- 
aide manner, hut' that their inert- 
ia! pi.At'fs may be cultivated and 
improved l\r the benefit 'of so- 
ciety." This concept of a college 
i* not one that people, especially 
SlUdenf*, have paid much atten- 
tion to in recent years. 

The section then states that 
the College hopes to create a 
place where "The fraternity 
houses and dormitories, athletic 
and nun -athletic activities, the 
constant association of students 
in a cjdfce-knit rather than a dis 
perse d college community a 



play their part." This conjures 
up the picture of the college as, a 
place to which students can with- 
draw to become "whole men." It 
implies that tffe college is really 
the only place where the com- 
munity is so small and controlled 
that the process of learning can 
go on undisturbed. 

In recent years, however, col- 
leges and universities have be- 
came centers of social action. 
More and more students are dis- 
associating themselves from 'any- 
real college community and be- 
coming members of the larger 
world. It is time for the small 
college to determine what dis- 
tinguishes it from major univer- 
sities and whether its differences 
warrant its continued existence. 

This article serves as an intro- 
duction to a series of articles by 
faculty, students, and adminis- 
trators on the future and func- 
tion of the liberal arts^-ollege. 



Petitions . . . 



(Continued from page 3) 
The Faculty also approved the 
following motion at its October 
13 meeting: "The faculty grate- 
fully acknowledges receipt of the 
Student Council's letter, read to 
the faculty by the Dean of the 
Faculty at the meeting of Octo- 
ber 13, in which the Council an- 
nounces the action it took on the 
Vietnam War at its meeting of 
October 6. The faculty endorses 
the administrative action already 
taken by President Howell to sus- 
pend the College's class atten- 
dance requirements for October 
■ 4 5." .'■ — : 



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FRIDAY. OCTOBER 17. 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE FIVE 



Community Uses Moratorium To Show Desire For Peace 



(Continued from page 1) 

macy for war) its longer goal." 
The worst speech of the morn- 
ing was given by John Cole, edit- 
or of The Maine Times: "Basi- - 
ally (the war) bothered me so 
much because it takes the lives 
away from people." 

Dave'Gordon '71, SDS, gave a 
fine demonstration of the suicidal 
tendencies of the New Left in a 
speech which called for class 
warfare: "The moratorium is a 
creation of the McCarthy-Kenne- 
dy bloc. It will only delay tak- 
ing effective action. . . . The war 
extends from the needs of Amer^ 
ican capitalism to maintain eco- 
nomic domination in the world. 

... It has been carefully planned 
for years." Gordon was followed 
by George Issacson who called 
for the College to take a stand on 
the war and by Dean Greason 
who told anecdotes of his trip to 
England. 

The final and best speech of 
the morning was given by Profes- 
sor Coursen : "Perhaps you saw 
last night Hugh Scott quivering 
with porcine fury over Tram 
Van Dong's, broadcast from 
North Vietnam in favor of the 
moratorium. He said that it was 
an unbearable intrusion into 
American domestic affairs. Well, 



what about our intrusion into 
Vietnamese domestic affairs? . '. . 
Perhaps you will recall that we 
didn't'elect Lyndon Johnson king. 
We didn't elect Richard Nixon 
king either." Ccursen's was the 
only political speech given that 
morning. The others were aca- 
demic, or religious or ideological 
or irrelevant. 

In the afternoon a brief ser- 
vice was held on the steps of the 
Walker Art Building in honor of 
the three Bowdoin men who were 
killed inVietnam. It was by far 
the most moving part of the 
moratorium. The quasi-religious 
atmcsphere that permeated each 
cf the moratorium's events fit 
better here. Profesor Whiteside 
read each man's record and talk- 
ed briefly about his memories of 
them. Father Davis disdained 
the office of professional prayer 
mcnger and delivered, instead, an 
address on the need for charity 
and love. The benediction was 
giyen by a nervous young minis- 
ter. The entire service didn't last 
more than 15 minutes. 

Later on there were teach-ins 
on the mall but the people who 
came were mostly "true believ- 
ers" who knew all the answers. 
Little dialogue was held on 
whether the war was right or 
wrong. Discussions dealt with 
such subjects as the exact degree 



of Richard Nixon's perfidy or 
how to pension off our South 
Vietnamese collaborators after 
we pulled out. 

In the evening a candlelight 
gathering wag held on the mall. 
About 200 people stood and list- 



ened to folk songs, anti-military 
poetry, the impassioned speech of 
Rollin Ives, and the evasive one 
of a state senator. 

What was accomplished? Po- 
litically, and that is the 'only way 
that counts, nothing was accom- 



plished. Wars are rarely stopped 
by candlelight parades. Reluc- 
tantly one is forced to agree with 
the headline of New Left Notes, 
the New England organ of the 
SDS, THE MORATORIUM IS A 
COVER, NOT A SOLUTION. 





photo b) Clark I »urrn 



PAGE SIX 



THE BOWDOJN ORIENT 



ERmAY, OCTOBER 17, 1069^ 




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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 



Former National Champ 



Racquets Man Is First For Bowdoin Court Sports 



(Ed. Note: Among the many improve- 
ments around campus this year is the ma- 
jor addition in the athletic department of' 
a rackets' coach for the tennis and squash 
teams. Mr. Ed Reid has left the glamour 
and excitement of the Hartford Golf Club, 
where he had been the tennis and squash 
pro for 23 years, for the ivy encrusted 
walls, the hallowed pines, and the wind- 
swept tennis courts of Bowdoin. 

After graduating from St. John's Uni- 
versity in New York Coach Reid spent 
some time with the Coast Guard before he 
started his career with a racket. He had 
begun playing tennis at age six and soon 
found he had an ability for squash also. 
With instruction from his father who was 
a teaching pro, Coach Reid became a 
champion and in 1947, 1949, 1950, and 1952 
"he won the World Professional Squash 
Championship. 

In the following Orient interview Coach 
Reid gives some of his reasons for coming 
to Bowdoin, what he has found here and 
what he hopes to do for the students he 
will be coaching.) 

ORIENT INTERVIEW BY 
CLARK LAUREN 

ORIENT: Why did you decide to leave the 
country club and come 'to Bowdoin? 
' REID: Well, this wasn't a decision I made 




of a new challenge. I also enjoy working 
with young people. Maybe I felt as I 
was getting a little bit older, and 

. thought that if I stayed around young 
people I would stay younger longer. 

ORIENT: I know you have only been here 
three weeks, but what are your first 
impressions of Bowdoin? 

REID: I'm 20 years too late. 

ORIENT: Do you really think you would" 
have enjoyed this more as a career than 
what you were doing previously? 

REID: Yes, I've made many close friends 
as a country club pro, but I've enjoyed 
myself immensely here so far. I've en- 
joyed the students and faculty and I 
think the facilities are great. I feel that 
in a smaller college like this you can 
get to know everyone and become a real 
part of the college community. You're 
not lost in a corner somewhere. 

ORIENT: As Bowdoin's first rackets' 
coach I imagine there was some funda- 
mental organizational work to do. What 
are some of the initial tasks you've con- 
cerned yourself with? 

REID; Well, the first thing you do in any 
job is to do a lot of listening, feeling 
your way around, and getting to know 
the place and the routine. 

ORIENT: You mentioned that there were 
a few things that needed improvement. 
Would you" care to el aborate on that? 

REID: I think the clay courts are very 
fine, but for the maintenance they aio 
understaffed. For lhat number of courts 
there should be more than one man, al- 
though George is doing a wonderful job, 
There is a hazardous condition with the 



within the past year or past two years. 
My father coached at Wesleyan many 
years ago and he told me at that time 
that he thought I might like to do the 
same. Then, I had many of my coaching 
friends at various colleges around New 
England and they always urged me to 
seek out a college job. When this oppor- 
tunity presented itself I liked the idea 



tapes where people can slip on and trip 
over them,,, so I would like to experiment 
ivith painting the lines. 

ORIENT: Have they given you any kind 
of a budget to work with? 

REID: I have not gotten into any budget 
items with any of the powers, but I 
imagine the college might be sympa- 
thetic to any reasonable request that 
might be made. Certainly, we aren't go- 
ing to try to do everything at once. One 
thing We have in mind is using the four 
indoor courts at the Hyde School. This 
will enable the tennis team to get a big 
head start on the season since you can 
be zipped out of a season very easily 
with the bad weather. I'm very optimis- 
tic about using these facilities. 

Of course I'm also looking forward to 
getting the squash team going. 

ORIENT: That will involve an increased 
budget right there. 

REID: I think the college anticipated that 
when they got a rackets coach up here. 
Obviously, as time goes on and we can 
show the administration that we are 
generating enthusiasm and there is a 
-need for it I certainly think that if they 



made a commitment towards having a 
person like myself they would have to 
go along with an increased budget to 
meet the situation. 

thusiasm and expanding the sport. Have 
you found any growing enthusiasm and 
what have you seen as far as talent is 
* considered? 

REID: I haven't seen anybody who would 
make me jump up and down and clap 
my hands for joy over their talent, but 
what has made me jump for joy is the 
enthusiasm and the desire to do a lot 
better even among the seniors who are 
only going U> s be here a short time 
longer. They're willing to do as much as 
they can to help me out. 

ORIENT: How do you like the Cal pro- 

gram the way it is set up now? 

REID: The boys that I had out there, and 
there are welfover 100 of them, had had 

• very little orno formal coaching. Some 
had not oven played the game. I told 
them that well whether you like it or 
not you have to listen to this and so 
make the most of it. I think they were 
surprised about it and I've hail some 

** comments that it was better than the\ 
t hough 1 it would lie. 

ORIENT: Do you have any comments on 
howyou are going to run the team, ten- 
nis or squash? 

REID; Welk til.-t o| all. when tile bo\ r 

find the\ have a qualified coach out 
there the.j are veiy witling to cooperate 
and listen. I thuik ihey are looking for 
direction and 1 afu u'omr t<> give it to 
them. And I have received nothing bu1 
.e,reat. enthuM.iMii lium LhxiKO I have 
talked to. 

ORIENT: Will physical training be an im- 
portant pari of the team practices? 

REID: Well, keeping in shape is one ol 
the most important party of any sport. 
I believe in ^et ting yourself in shape by 
playing yourself in shape. You also have 
• to play a pretty clean life outside too. 
You can't be playing everyday and 
smoking and drinking every night - es- 
pecially t he smoking. 

ORIENT: What about fall competition? 

REID; We have already set up a round 
robin tournament. It was partly for my 
own benefit to get a look at the tennis 
team and form a general idea of who 
played how. 

ORIEN T: And how did you like the way 
"who played how"? 

REID: We haven't been able to determine 
that yel because these guys have been 
a little remiss about playing Ihcir 
matches, and so I'm going to be a little 
bit more . . . maybe I was too nice in 
the way I asked them. 

ORIENT; Let's get back to your ideas on 
coaching. 

REID: I think really, basically most 



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young men today want to I 

to do. They want to hi 
cjiusc ii the> have a qua 
they're able to find it out 
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• told what 
a little be- 
llied coach 
ttiej U 



ORIK N'T: Y..u me. m a> 

,iiiili.i> i- in inccwTod? 

REI1 ! .Not "lib as far a itl 
but I t hmk in mam other a 
I'\ e ' had i his ewpwk'jH c 
K roup* 1 1 you have these extra 

'b un's 1 ti .n Uic kids can ynt "or acquire 
from you then 1 think you've made a 
fi nil ibul ion to them. 

OK1KMT: What little extra things? 

ttEll): Well, the little exira things that 
help yoq win. When I was competing 
p r o f essional ly h good part ol my success 
was psychology. First of all, I had a 
confii nt attitude. Nothing bothered 
me, and 1 would only bring up excuses 

, , fur .someone else, to latch onto... One of 
these excuses my opponent might find 
to lose by. There are a million things 
and the poor competitor is always look- 
ing for an excuse: (he strings are lousy, 
a sore arm. sneakers don't fit, anything 
ai all. This psychological factor is a tre- 
mendous thing all through life in de- 
termining whose K"in^ to do what. 

OIIIENT: Now that you are here what 
do you expect from the students'? 

i:i:iii i hope thai the students them- 
Selves help generate the interest in ten- 
nis and squash now thai they know they 
have somebody whose interested in them 
and whose job it is to work with them. 
It i> yery important for the Ixiys to 
build the enthusiasm ahiong themselves' 
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PAGE EIGHT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1969 



-A, 



/ t 





's 



^ss»rwkVSWHs™ss™B ''■•'■ *\'< 



photo by Dave Sperling 



FALLING SOCKS I . . John Philipsborn (35) 
as Lee Howe heads the ball in last weekends 3-2 
upset victory over Amherst. 



photo by Dave Speriwt 

SMILIN' PHASES. A Bowdoin crowd of over 300 greeted the Bears 
when they entered the Amherst field last weekend. 

Harriers Run Over Despite 
Cuneo's Record Breaking 

BY ED STUART AND KARL WASSERMAN 

Orient Sports Writers 

Despite the record-breaking performance of Bowdoin's star harrier, 
Mark Cuneo, the Bear runners suffered their first set back of the sea- 
son to Amherst last Saturday, 38-21. 

Mark Cuneo recorded a time of 23:19.8 to best the existing 23:32.5, 
set October 19, 1968 by a Coast 



photo by Dave SperhnK 

WIREY WILEY . . . holds onto ball against the 
Lord Jeffs in Saturday's 23-7 loss. Wiley had been 
out on injuries and returned last week. 



Booters Upset Lord Jeffs;~ 
Look For Even Record 

Down by two goals at the end of the first quarter, the varsity 
hooters came back halfway through the second period last Sat- 
urday to tie the score and eventually close the match with a 3-2 
upset victory over the favored Amherst Lord Jeffs. _' 



Amherst opened the scoring by 
batting in two consecutive goals 
during the first 20 minutes of 
play. The first came on a direct 
kick from midfield which sailed 
past a miscalculating Bear goalie. 
Good Lord Jeff passing worked 
their next goal past a tight man- 
to-man Bowdoin defense. 

Rick Wilson brought a cross 
under control and scored the first 
Bowdoin goal ten minutes into 
the second quarter. Several min- 
utes later, 'Snack' Barr picked up 
the^- new Bowdoin spirit ami 
blasted in a thirty yard kick from 
the right side. The period closed 
with the score at 2-2 after the 
Bears successfully sustained a 
hard-pressing attack. 

After the see-saw play of the 
first part of the third period, Jim 
Burnett shot on goal with a cor- 
ner kick and scored off a deflec- 
tion from the Amherst goalie. 

The Lord Jeff's back was fi- 
nally broken in the fourth quar- 
ter when Bear goalie Russ Out- 
huse successfully blocked an Am- 
herst penalty kick. In the re- 
maining minutes, the Bowdoin 
defense was able to contain Am- 
herst's substitutions while the 
offense still maintained a con- 
stant scoring threat. 

In part, the victory over Am- 
herst can be accredited to suc- 
cessful crossing and wing to wing 
play, the first time this season 
the team has done either admir- 
ably. The forward line augment- 
ed the defense by keeping their 
halfbacks in check — important 
in defense, but rarely done effec- 



tively. Commented one Bowdoin 
player, ''It was the most satisfy- 
ing win of the season, mainly due 
to the high calibre of playing. 
Everyone was really playing the 
game the way it should be 
played." 



Guard cadet. After Cuneo's first 
place finish, the Lord Jeffs came 
on strong, taking the next four 
places." Second for Bowdoin, and 
finishing sixth in the meet was 
Mark's older brother, Ken. 

Completing the Bowdoin fin- 
ishers were Lever and Steve Mo- 
riarly tied for fourth, Bill Seekins 
in twelfth, Bruce Murphy in thir- 
teenth, and Bob Basset holding 
down fourteenth. 

The frosh cross country team, 
following their own schedule, met 
MCI on October 8, only to suffer 
a 22-36 loss. First for the Bears, 
and second in the meet, was 
Steve Marchand who ran only 
four seconds behind the winning 
MCI man. 



Gridders Keep To Ground; 
Overrun By Jeffs 23-7 

(Ed. Note: After the varsity football loss last Saturday, the Orient 
asked one of Bowdoin's coeds to give her impressions of the ball game. 
The following is in answer to that request and goes to shown that the 
female still has a knack for interpreting the complex in most simplistic 
terms. The more conventional account of the game appears below and 
in a page 7 caption story. ) 



And here I am. Luckily, I have 
been to a Bowdoin football game 
before so I know which team is 



The Football Story Retold 



Polar Bearings 



Led by senior quarterback 
John Kehoe, who ran for two 
.ouchdowns and threw another, 
unbeaten Amherst sailed past 
Bowdoin last weekend as the 
Bears suffered their second con- 
secutive loss, 2U-7. 

Amherst broke the scoring ice 
in the first period with a 35 yard 
field goal by George Triano and 
padded its lead to 10-0 by half- 
time. Another touchdown in the 
third period by Kehoe ended 
Amherst's offensive thrust for 
the day. John Benson got Bow- 



doin on the scoreboard with a one 
yard run following a sustained 
drive highlighted by four pass re- 
ceptions by sophomore end Cliff 
Webster and two more by junior 
Paul Wiley. 

A surprising aspect of the 
game were the statistics, as Bow- 
doin gained 287 yards on offense 
but could only muster seven 
points. As against Wesleyan, 
Bowdoin moved the ball between 
the 20's, but could not penetrate 
the end zone. 



Football 



Bowdoin 



23 



7 Amherst 

1-2 

at Williams Sat. 2:00 

Bowdoin Fr. 20 Vermont Acad 32 

0-2 

vf. Bridgton Fri. 2:0ft 

Soccer " * 

Bowdoin 3 Amherst 2 

2-3 

at Williams Sat. 1:00 

Bowdoin Fr. S Hebron 2 

Bowdoin Fr. 4 Exeter 

4-0 

vs. Hinckley Fri. 2:30 

Cross Country 

38 Amherst 

1-1 

at Williams Sat. 12:30 

Bowdoin Fr. 38 MAW 

0-2 

at Hebron Wed. 



Bowdoin 



21 



23 



CAR FOR SALE 

1966 VOLKSWAGEN CON- 
VERTIBLE, red, very good 
condition. Car was purchased 
in March of this year and at 
that time had a rebuilt engine 
installed and a new paint job. 

Has been driven less than 
10,000 miles since installation 
of rebuilt engine. 

CALL 448-3254 




ours when it comes running onto 
the field. This is my favorite part 
of a game — when the guys are 
doing sit-ups, running all around, 
and slugging each other. 

There was the kickoff. The 
kickoff, the refs blowing their 
whistles, half-time, and when the 
score changes by either six or 
seven points are the only times 
when I'm really sure what's go- 
ing on. All through the game I've 
been looking at the scoreboard, 
trying to figure out what all the 
numbers mean. 

There goes a ref again. He's 
blowing his whistle and running 
to where the ball is. They all are. 
And -there are those boys with 
those funny rope-things running, 
too. Now the ref is waving his 
arms, blowing his whistle, and 
running all around again as if 
he's dancing. Oops. Everyone 
around me is cheering about 
something. 

4 

It's half-time. Now I can have 
a hot dog and watch the cheer- 
leaders. Those cheerleaders are 
unbelievable and great to watch. 
They never seem to be doing the 
same cheer at the same time. And 
they're always jumping around 
with the Polar Bear. Great! The 
Bear just belted one of the cheer- 
leaders. If I didn't know better, 
I'd think ... 

My Gcd! I don't believe it! 
Bowdoin has scored, we really 
have! 



EXCUSE ME, LORD JEFF. Ray Cbounard (right) and an unidentified Boar block for John Dela- 
hanty's punt against Amherst last weekend. The Polar Boor* wore hold to a ground attack by poor 
past blocking and an aggressive Amherst lino. 



Bears Face Ephs 

The Polar Bears travel to Wil- 
liamstown Saturday for their 
next bout. Last weekend the Wil- 
liams Ephs brought their record 
to 2-1 by defeating Middlebury, 
37-14, in an explosive running at- 
tack which saw Williams tally 457 
yards rushing and 26 firs_t downs. 
Varsity coach Catuzzi commented 
in the William's "Record," "Bow- 
doin. our next opponent, looked 
very tough physically, especially 
on defense . . . against Amherst." 
Saturday wilUell. 



Seminar Presents Selections from Greek Laureate 



By STEVE RUSTARI 

Try to guard them, poet, 

however few there are that can be kept. 

The visions of your loving. 

Set them, half hidden, in your phrases. 

Try to sustain them, poet, 
* when they are roused in your brain 

at night, or in the glare of noon. 
Although about only twenty people came to listen 
to "Some Notes and Readings from the Poetry of 
Constantine Cavafy," presented last Thursday evening 
in Wentworth Hall, Dr. Anthony G. Trisolini deliv- 
ered a fine lecture and oral interpretation. It was un- 
usual not to have a poet reading his own poems; it 
was unusual also not to have read the work of an Eng- 
lish or American poet, but a Greek one. Those unu- 
sualities may account for the unusually (or is it usu- 
ally?) small turn-out, but they did not prevent a good 
performance. 

English translations of Cavafy's poems lose the in- 
tricacy of rhyme, the regularity of iambs, and the ri- 
valry between demotic (common) and purist Greek 
which the poet originally employed, but the transla- 



tions, if good, do convey what W. H. Auden calls 
Cavafy's unique ''tone of voice," or "personal speech." 
Translation has an inherent artistic remove from the 
original work, but reading aloud that translation is an 
attempt at removing "that remove by conveying the 
aesthetic, emotional, and intellectual meanings which 
survive, or transcend, translation. 

Auden no more succinctly, but differently, states the 
potential for removing the remove: "To the degree 
that a poem is the product of a certain culture, it is 
difficult to translate into terms of another culture, 
but to the degree that it is the expression of a unique 
human being, it is as easy, or as difficult, for a per- 
son from an alien culture to appreciate as for one of 
the cultural group to which the poet happens to be- 
long." 

Cavafy's poetry climbs the barriers of language and 
culture because .Cavafy was a true cosmopolite: he 
lived in Constantinople, London, and A'exandria, the 
last of which was where he worked as a provisional 
clerk in the Ministry of Irrigation for thirty years; he 
knew, besides ancient and modern Greek, English, 
French, Italian, Latin, and Arabic. Although (or, per- 



haps, because) he has been dead for nearly forty years 
and was unabashedly homosexual, he is now the vir- 
tual poet laureate of Greece, which he never saw or 
visited until he was thirty-eight. 

The irony of his life is reflected in the tone of his 
work. Many of his poems are about ancient Greece, 
but not the glory that was Greece: the time of his 
poems is after the fall of the Alexandrian empire. The 
gods he writes about are dead ("They Ought to Have 
Cared") ; the politics he writes about are powerless 
and futile ("Waiting for the Barbarians"). Woven in- 
to the historical context of his poems are revelations 
of his own sexual desires. In ''Caesarion" he writes 
about an insignificant king, a son of Cleopatra, but he 
also writes about his own physical passion for the 
young man which he does not crudely underscore, but 
subtly reveals. Rae Dalven translates that the persona 
of the poem had a "vague fascination" of Caesarion: 
Dr. Trisolini read his translation with an ironic pause, 
which he used so effectively throughout his perform- 
ance, stressing that the person* found an "indefinite 
enchantment" in the young king. But while many of 
( Please turn to page 5) 



THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 

The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 



VOLUME XCIX 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK. MAINE. FRIDAY. OCTOBER 24. 1969 



NUMBER 4 



Top Students Honored SDS Stance Defined: 

A ^ i • o i i College Hurts People 

As rJowdoin Scholars 



Dr. Lincoln Gordon, President 
of The Johns Hopkins University, 
was the principal speaker this 
morning at the Jarhes Bowdoin 
Day Exercises scholarship convo- 
cation. Bowdoin's leading under- 
graduates were honored in exer- 
cises highlighting Parents' Week- 
end. 

Dr. Gordon spoke on "Liberal 
Education for the 21st Century." 
Dr. Gordon, who succeeded Dr. 
Milton Eisenhower as President 
of Johns Hopkins in 1967, is a 
summa cum laude Harvard grad- 
uate in the Class of 1933. As a 
Rhodes Scholar, he studied at Ox- 
ford University, where he received 
his D.Phil. degree in 1936. He 
holds honorary degrees from 
Fairleigh Dickinson, Rutgers, Co- 
lumbia, the University of Mary- 
land, Washington College, . and 
Loyola. 



Relations from 1955 to 1961. 

His government work has also 
included the post of Chief of the 
Mutual Security Agency Mission 
to the United Kingdom and Minis- 
ter for Economic Affairs in the 
American Embassy in London, 
and Director of the Program Di- 
vision, Economic Cooperation Ad- 
ministration, in Washington, D.C., 



and in Paris. 

The author of numerous publi- 
cations, Dr. Lincoln is a Fallow 
of the American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences, a member of Phi 
Beta Kappa, and a Director of the 
Center for Inter-American Rela- 
tions, the Equitable Life Assur- 
ance Society of the U.S., and the 
Overseas Development Council. 



"118.5 To 1'? 



"Dramatic Swing" Cited 




Prior to assuming his present 
position, Dr. Gordon was Assis- 
tant Secretary of State for Inter- 
American Affairs from 1966 to 
1967, and was U.S. Ambassador 
to Brazil for five years previous 
to that. He is a former member 
of the faculty of Harvard, where 
he served as William Ziegler Pro- 
fessor of International Economic 



By JAY SWEET 
Coeducation is an issue calcu- 
lated to raise the ardor of under- 
graduates, the wrath of alumni, 
and the blood pressure of admin- 
istrators. More than any other 
single issue, it reveals and crys- 
tallizes the forces of change 
which exist on this campus and 
others like it. Sunday night at 
the Senior Center, Mrs. Mary I. 
Bunting, President of Radcliffe 
College, spoke clearly and openly 
to that issue. 

Mrs. Bunting began by at- 
tempting to define what she 
termed "a dramatic swing to- 
wards coeducation," particularly 
at northeastern colleges, from 
her experiences at Radcliffe. It is 
her feeling that a genuinely co- 
educational environment is not 
created by a system of co-ordi- 
nate colleges. In support of that 
position, she cited what she felt 
to be the major factors giving 
rise to the desire for coeducation 
in American colleges. First, she 
sees an authentic increase in the 
emotional maturity of this gener- 
ation of college students. They 
are conscious of themselves . as 
adults, and demand recognition 
of that consciousness in their in- 
stitutions; in Mrs. Buntings 
words, "if you want to live like 
people, you don't want to be seg- 
regated by sex." Proceeding from 
this main point, she suggested 
the increased "importance of 
openness" to this generation. 
Equally Important, she sees a 
new role emerging for women In 



this society, a partial by product 
of the civil rights movement. This 
idea of a "new woman" is central 
to her concept of coeducation. 
She placed a great emphasis on 
the importance of creating edu- 
cational structures flexible 
enough to serve the woman who 
is capable of making a vital con- 
tribution to this society profes- 

(Please turn to page S) 



By JOHN LIFFMANN 

Since SD ) distributed the leaflet about campus workers, I have been 
talking to quite a few students and workers. The general reaction has 
been that the facts are true. The administration took away two paid-va- 
cations. Campus workers in the library, kitchens, and grounds and build- 
ings are paid lousy wages. 
At the same time, most people, especially campus workers, weren't 
, sure what SDS was or what its view of the college and society are. 

Many people view the college as an institution which serves the com- 
mon good. Beneath this lofty ideal is reality: the college is a boss which 
tries to keep wages as low as possible. 

There are other ways in which the college hurts the "common good." 
For example it invests in GM, GE, and International Harvester, which 
have large investments in South Africa. These corporations help the ra- 
cist government of South Africa stay in power and keep black people in 
slave labor. It invests in Morgan Guaranty Trust which bailed South Af- 
rica out of trouble in the early sixties. Here the college supports racist 
corporations and governments. 

The college hurts people in more ways. It supports CIA and military 
recruiters and ROTC en campus. These provide leadership (65% of 2nd 
lieutenants in the case of ROTC) for -the Army, Marines. These military 
forces are used to crush people's movements. The sharpest case is in 
Vietnam where the US govt, has massively invaded with 500,000 troops in 
order to prop up a few rich landlords and maintain US business' right to 
expand to Southeast Asia: 

On of the world's richest areas is open to the winner 
in Indochina. That's behind the growing US concern . . 
Tin, rubber, rice . . . are what the war is really about. 
The US sees it as a place to bold at any cost. 
(US News and World Report, April 1954) 
(Please turn to page 4) 



Employees and Employer Concur 
No Outstanding Grievances Exist 



In spite of S.D.S. charges, it appears that most 
college employees neither believe the college mis- 
treats them nor want any affiliation with S.D.S. 

The S.D.S. flyer of two weeks ago began with 
this paragraph: 

"Last year the administration took away two 
holidays, Patriot's Day and George Washington's 
birthday, which campus workers had be^ getting 
for years. In response to this the campus workers, 
led by a Buildings and Grounds man, began to 
build for a union, which would fight against such 
grievances. As the drive gained strength, the Ad- 
ministration bought off the leader of the drive by 
getting him a better job. Thus, the Administra- 
tion effectively ended the Union attempt without 
dealing with the grievance." 

Mr. Ralph Allen, Assistant Superintendent of 
Buildings and Grounds, explained that the employ- 
ees formed a workers association, not a union. 
"When we organized, the membership was not 
very large and would have been much smaller if 



we had used the word 'union' in the name. There 
wasn't much feeling for a union, partly because of 
the connotations of strike. 

Allen said the organization was formed because 
employees felt the college "didn't exactly under- 
stand all the problems we face." The Association 
was an attempt to create a little more understand- 
ing. "I don't think anyone ever felt we were dis- 
regarded or abused." 

"I think there was a feeling on the part of a 
number of people, that there was nothing real in 
the sense of negotiations and never had been. Of 
course, there's never been any difficulty in talking 
to anyone in the administration, but I think that 
the point of view of the college and workmen is 
a different one." 

As to the charge that he was "bought off," Mr. 
Allen replied that some people may believe it be- 
cause of the coincidence of the formation of the 
association and his advancement, but that he had 
(Please turn to pace 4) 



PAGE TWO 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1969 



KENNEBEC FRUIT CO. 
142 MAINE STREET 

RIPE POMEGRANATES 

SMOKER'S 

PARAPHERNALIA 



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Jewelry 
Musical Supplies 

147 MAINE STREET 
BRUNSWICK 



Moratorium Politics ... Ballet °// gm/ 



(Continued from page 4) 

and Cambodian wars are inevit- 
able. Their attitude toward relying 
solely on peaceful demonstrations i 
coincides with that of Professor 
Eric Solomon from San Francisco 
State College, "We protest, but it 
is essentially masturbation. There 
is no fruitful seed that comes out 
of this." Mrs. Darling had made 
arrangements to rent a large room 
over MacBeans' book and record 
shop. This room would serve as 
headquarters for the local peace 
movement. Several members of 
the ad hoc committee desired 
more "personal confrontation" in 
trying to sell the peace movement. 
They also suggested that business 



shutdowns and increased pressure 
on Congressmen would contribute 
to the mounting pressure on the 
Nixon administration. One student 
suggested that clean-up programs 
in slums \yould "make the point 
that money is being deflected by 
the war, which could be spent on 
more constructive programs." 

Future meetings of the local 
peace organizations will decide 
which of these programs will be 
implemented in Brunswick. 



KING'S BARBER SHOP 

212 MAINE STREET - BRUNSWICK 

Roff ler Sculpture-Kut 
Men's Razor Cut & Hair Styling 



On Wednesday, October 22, 
memorial services were held for 
William C. Root, Charles Weston 
Pickard Professor of Chemistry. 
There were approximately 40 fac- 
ulty and friends and exactly 3 
students who attended the ser- 
vices for the professor who died 
suddenly last spring. The cere- 
monies consisted solely of a eulogy 
delivered by President Howell. 



♦KEYBOARD AND 
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L ANDOWSKA One ot the greatest 

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Leotard Set Gains Credit 



By FRED CUSICK 

The Renaissance began in Italy 
about the middle of the 15th cen- 
tury. By 1500 it had spread to 
England, France, Germany, and 
the Netherlands. It reached 
America about 1930 when, as a re- 
sult of the Depression, the income 
of the average American farmer 
sank to the same level as that of 
the average American artist. 
There were some places the Re- 
naissance never reached, e.g. Ire- 
land, Russia, and until recently 
Bowdoin. 

Bowdoin has only begun to 
emerge from its Middle Ages. 
Many vestiges of the old order re- 
main. The eleven fraternities, like 
eleven warring religious orders, 
still do battle every September 
for the souls of the incoming 
freshmen. Women, until this year, 
were kept off campus for all ex- 
cept immoral purposes. Searles 
Hall, the "science" building, re- 
sembles a medieval castle com- 
plete with dungeon. The lively 
arts, with the exception of choral 
music (Choral music was a fa- 
vored art during the Middle Ages 
in Europe.), have languished at 
Bowdoin. 

Drama, literature, poetry, 
painting, dance, they are almost 
non-existent at Bowdoin in any 
creative sense. The case of dance 
provides a good example. There 
has always been something sus- 
pect to the Bowdoin mind about a 
man running around the stage in 



BRUNSWICK PLAZA 

CINEMA U2 



COOr b 



a .*L»tr it »«*.* 

*aMTsMtll*)0«l)Mll 



tights. Any man who dances by 
himself like that is sure to wear 
pink pants and keep a poodle. 
Last year Professor Richard 
Hornby, Director of Dramatics, 
and Mrs. Ruth Gibson, who runs 
a dancing school in Brunswick, 
organized a small class in modern 
dance. It was composed of Mask 
and Gown members with the idea 
of teaching them how to relax on 
stage through constant exercise 
off stage. Modern dance is ex- 
tremely demanding physically. 
Many athletes in Europe use it as 
a method of training. Some mem- 
bers of the Mask and Gown group 
dropped the class because they 
found it too physically taxing. 
The majority who stayed discov- 
ered that their body control, if 
not their acting, improved. 

This year Mask and Gown 
didn't have enough money to 
sponsor a class. It was suggested 
that the Athletic Department 
might provide the funds since an 
hour of modern dance is consider- 
ably more interesting and de- 
manding physically than the 
three hours of basketball, foot- 
ball, or volleyball that make up 
a regular cal class. The funds 
were not provided but now any 
student who wishes to satisfy 
his cal. requirement can do so by 
taking one hour of modern dance 
a week. 

The introduction of modern 
dance into the curriculum is a 
small indication that perhaps the 
Middle Ages are ending at Bow- 
doin. Its position under the Ath- 
letic Department, however, causes 
one to wonder whether this is just 
a lull between two periods of bar- 
barism. „ 



ofcfep ' 
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FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE THREE 



Environmental Advantage Primary 



(Continued from page 1) 

sionally, but is either unable or 
unwilling to sacrifice her tradi- 
tion roles as wife and mother. 
Men and women take a parallel 
course through their undergradu- 
ate years; however, at the gradu- 
ate level, many opportunities 
are closed to women through 
their inability to continue as full 
time students. She documented 
this position with her experience 
in the cases of women who are 
qualified to take M.D. degrees — 
a professional category disas- 
trously undermanned — but who 
are not qualified for hospital 
residency training since they can- , 
not operate as full time students. 
As further evidence of this 
change in sexual attitudes, Mrs. 
Bunting spoke of the demand for 
a merger of Harvard and Rad- 
cliffe, a complete integration of 
sexes under the house system. 
This demand, she feels, does not 
stem from any lack of social or 
academic mixing. Rather, the 
lack is in sharing of intellectual 
experience; contact outside of the 
conventional forms of dating. 
Mrs. Bunting sees, and emphati- 
cally supports, a new spirit of 
liberation implied by this demand. 
Basically, she feels that students 
want to escape rigidly sexual def- 
initions, that they seek redefini- 
tion as simply people. 

Although Mrs. Bunting enthu- 
siastically promotes, she states 
clearly educators have only re- 
cently began to define just what 
constitutes Utopia and what con- 
stitutes now. The issues raised 
are both complex and far-reach- 
ing. She speaks of her own ex- 
perience as a college president 
involved in a huge alumni fund 
raising drive enthusiastically sup- 
porting a scheme which would 
eliminate that college as an en- 
tity. A reorientation of alumni is 
a prerequisite to any radical in- 
stitutional change. In the discus- 
sion led by a panel of four Bow- 
doin seniors following her ad- 
dress, questions of both the na- 
ture of the college community 
and its responsibilities to its dif- 
ferent members were raised. 

How soon can coeducation come 
to Bowdoin? The idea of a co-or- 
nate sister school was not dis- 
cussed; clearly, the advantages of 
a coeducational environment are 
minimized under that system. The 
model which was proposed was 
that of admitting a class equally 
divided, or nearly so, among the 
two sexes. Mrs. Bunting, although 
not thoroughly familiar with 



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Bowdoin's specific situation, did 
not see any immediate financial 
difficulty in that model. She did 
anticipate difficulties with Bow- 
doin's athletic facilities; however, 
it was her opinion that that de- 
partment, as well as others, 
would ultimately be strengthened 
by curriculum changes involving 
co-education. This process of up- 
grading, she felt, would be even 
more significant in areas such as 
the social sciences, her premise 
being that increased demand 
would dictate expansion and im- 
provement. Additionally, it has 
been observed that co-education 
causes a significant increase both 
in the numbers and the desirabil- 
ity of candidates for admission. 
Conversely, as other schools be- 
come co-educational. Bowdoin will 
become relatively less attractive. 
Under other models, however, fi- 
nancial considerations would be 
far more significant. Any at- 
tempt to maintain the present 
male enrollment with a simul- 
taneous addition of a significant 
number of women would involve 
expansion of every college fa- 
cility. It is at this point that the 
question of the definition of the 
community — a definition that 
necessarily involves alumni — 
must be answered. Even if the 
College were to accept co-educa- 
tion within the present enroll- 
ment, alumni and their gifts 
would create problems. Aside 
from the fact that some, and per- 
haps many alumni would with- 
draw support from an institution 
which they could no longer iden- 
tify, implications of co-education 
could strain alumni relations over 
a period of years. For instance, 
if this College were to accept 
only 125 men every year for the 



next four, there is every proba- 
bility that competitive sports, in 
which the alumni have a certain 
interest, would suffer. Finally, the 
point was made, as it was in the 
Pierce Report, that the sexually 
segregated institution should not 
beccme extinct. This argument 
was not felt to be particularly 
compelling, the prevalent attitdde 
seeming to be that someone else's 
school could adequately represent 
the nineteenth^c^ntury. 

The conclusion seems to be that 
co-education is the answer to 
many, if not all, of the problems 
of this school. It offers exciting 
and genuine educational and en- 
vironmental advantages, and the 
demand exists now. However, the 
College is placed in the complex 
and difficult position of reconcil- 
ing a radical and probably expen- 
sive institutional change with a 
probable decrease in income. The 
answer must, and will be found; 
in the meantime, the long waits 
for the weekends will continue. 



October 


29 Dartmouth — Amos 


Tuck School 


30 Columbia Business 


School Owens-Illinois 


November 


3 Boston University 


School of Business Ad- 


ministration 


4 Naval Officer Program 


6 Northeast Graduate 


School of Accounting 


10 University of Virginia 


Graduate Business 


School 


20 National Security 


Agency Civil Service 




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Council Cuts Car Rule 



By JEFF DRl'MMOND 

Abolition of the rule prohibiting 
cars for freshmen and students 
on scholarship was the major rec- 
ommendation of the Student Life 
Committee. Chip Fendler reported 
to the Student Council on Mon- 
day night that in a "near unani- 
mous" vote, the committee ad- 
vised suspension of the rule. Re- 
vocation will not go into effect un- 
til the Administration approves 
it. The problem is, according to 
Dean of Students, Paul Nyhus, 
that the rule cannot be revoked 
until the responsible administra- 
tive body can be found. If the de- 
cision rests with the Dean himself, 
it could come as quickly as two 
weeks. If, however, the decision 
must be taken to the faculty, due 
to the law that all motions have 
to be discussed in at least two fac- 
ulty meetings, the process could 
take months. The Dean also coun- 
selled against the assumption that 
the rule would be revoked. He 
himself remained impartial, he 
said, until the recommendations 
of the other committees were sub- 
mitted. > 

In another motion, the Council 
voted to discuss in the house 
meetings this week whether the 
Council should finance mixers 
with the money collected from 
traffic fines. Since this has only 
amounted in past years to $500, 
there would have to be admission 
charges. 

In other actions, the Council 



elected Al Jessel, Doug Bird and 
Steph Fay to the Alumni Council, 
and scheduled a meeting with the 
Athletic Committee on the physi- 
cal education requirement. 

The highlight of the evening 
was the reading of a letter from 
Bradford Junior College. The let- 
ter invited fifteen men down from 
Bowdoin for five one-act plays at 
$10 each. The plays include Adap- 
tation and Next, currently smash 
Broadway hits. After the plays 
there will be a discussion and re- 
freshments and dinner will be 
served to the men on their way 
back from Boston. Since the dead- 
line for acceptance is today, any- 
one interested is asked to contact 
Dean Nyhus immediately. 

Journalistic 
Tribulations 



PITTSBURGH — (CPS) — 
The Pitt News, on strike for two 
weeks, resumed publication Octo- 
ber 13 after winning demands of 
$9,000 in staff salaries, a journal- 
ism seminar for academic credit, 
and over $4,000 additional cash 
for printing costs. 

The crisis occurred when the 
Student Government cut the 
newspaper budget by $17,000 
more than half of the $39,000 
they had asked for, and merit 
scholarships were dropped for 
staff members. 



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PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. OCTOBER 24, 1969 



Black College Officers Employees Reject SDS Charges 
Suggest Share Funds 



By BILL SIEVERT 
College Press Service 

While almost 2,000 white col- 
lege presidents and top adminis- 
trators were studying "The Cam- 
pus and Racial Crisis," 111 black 
college presidents were forming 
their own structure to deal with 
crises particular to their cam- 
puses. 

The black presidents revealed 
plans during the meeting for their 
new group which will be called 
"The Organization of Black Col- 
leges" until a permanent name is 
decided upon. 

"We are committed to the im- 
mediate goal of racial integration 
in American life," said President 
Martin Jenkins of Morgan State 
College. 

Henderson said the primary 
goal of the group is to influence 
legislation at all levels of govern- 
ment, particularly to gain a 
greater share of the resources set 
aside for higher education for 
predominantly black colleges. 

"The whole spectrum of higher 
education is not in the best state. 
The small colleges have more 
problems than the large univer- 
sities. And the small black col- 
leges are having even a greater 
(financial) crisis," Henderson 
said. 

In a separate session President 
Herman R. Branson, from Ohio's 
black Central State College, 
called for "tithing" from white 
colleges to black colleges. "Maybe 
the two H's in higher education, 
Harvard and Howard, can get to- 
gether. Harvard could give How- 
ard one-tenth of its gifts." 

Branson noted that Harvard 
University can get more financial 
gifts annually than the entire 
United Negro College Fund. 

The number of drop-outs at 
Central State last year equaled 
the total drop-out figure at Har- 
vard, Brandeis, MIT, and the 
main campus of the University of 
Virginia, he said. "Most of those 
at Central State dropped out for 
financial reasons." 



Jenkins, speaking with Hender- 
son, said, "If the nation is to 
maintain its sanity, these institu- 
tions (black colleges) are going 
to have to be used as an essen- 
tial and important national re- 
source." 

The black presidents main- 
tained that while their colleges 
as well as white colleges must 
and are becoming integrated, 
there always will be a role for 
their colleges to help educate 
Americans. Their colleges will not 
die with integrated education, 
they said. 

At the moment, they said, their 
colleges are extremely vital to 
the education of blacks. Nearly 
half of the black students in col- 
leges are at predominantly black 
institutions, while most of the 
predominantly white colleges are 
less than two per cent black. 

Alexander Astin, director of the 
Office of Research of the Ameri- 
can Council on Education, said it 
does no good for schools to fi 
over which one gets the most 
cessful black students, because 
fighting for the cream of the c 
does not increase theJsase nu 
ber of black students getting 
college education. 

"Our whole concept of admis- 
sions has been misdirected," As- 
tin said. "We should select the 
students most likely to be helped, 
changed benefitted by the institu- 
tion rather than the winners. If 
we pick only the bright kids, we 
don't have to do anything. Just 
funnel them through and after 
four years give out the B.A. de- 
gree." 

Astin said a "lottery" system 
of admission, random selection 
from all those in the community 
who want to attend a college, is 
the only democratic way to give 
all groups an equal chance at edu- 
cation. Admissions criteria should 
be abandoned, He said. Astin had 
previously favored a black quota 
system to assure that at least a 
certain number of blacks would 
Im? admitted. 




SDS Ties College to War 

(Continued from page I) 

From Vietnam to Guatemala to the Dominician Republic, US military 
might is used to crush any kind of people's movement. Bowdoin helps by 
keeping recruiters and ROTC on campus. 

Yet some people do profit from ROTC, CIA etc. A small group (.5% of 
population) control almost three quarters of corporate stock (Who Rules 
America). This class of people is represented on campus by the Trus- 
tees. For example, 

William Pierce-law partner Sullivan and Cromwell; member of 
numerous funds, corporations, party fund-raising committees, 
Council of Foreign Relations 
Charles Cary — director of duPont 

Widgery Thomas — chairman of board, Canal National Bank 
Frederick Perkins — director. Aetna Life and Casualty etc. 
Other corporations represented arc Liberty Mutual, State Street Bank. 
These corporations and men have an interest in keeping the CIA and- 
military recruiters on campus for it is their investments and their em- 
pire that are being defended. For example Cary and duPont's investments 
through Latin America and Africa must be protected. This is the role the 
military plays. 

Thus what many people in SDS believe is that the college screws most 
of the people. The clearest way is in its role as boss. What we hope to do 
is fight against the ways the college and government hurts people. 

THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Member of the United States Student Press Association 



Editor 

Alan Kolod 

Manag-tng Editor 

Jay Sweet 

News Editor 

Bob Naah 

Sporti Editor 
Martin Fricdlandcr 



Basinest Manager 

Bob Armstrong; 

Advertising Muiirtr 
Peter Mejitrlck 

Office Manager 

Fred Lansrrman 

Circulation Manager 

Bill Harpin 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Alan Kolod. Sam Hastings. Jay Sweet, Martin Friedlander. Bob Naah. John Weiea 

Pan! Barton, Paul Batista. 

THE BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
A. P. Daggett. J. P. Granger, Alan Kolod, Bob Armstrong. 

Published weekly when classes are held during the Fall and Spring Semester by the 
students of Bowdoin College. Address editorial communications to the Editor and 
business and subscription communications to the Business Mansirer at the ORIENT 
Moulton Union. Bowdoin College. Brunswick. Me. 0401 L Represented for national 
advertising by the National Educational Advertising Service. Inc. Second class postage 
paid at Brunswick. Me. 04011. The subscription rata Is five (6) dollars for one yea- 



( Continued from page 1) 

made it clear when he took the job as president 
that he would only serve temporarily because he 
expected either to be promoted or to move into 
another job. 

Larry Pinette, president of the association af- 
ter Allen, also said that the association was not 
attempting to use force to change conditions be- 
cause it felt that reason and persuasion would 
work. He and other workers said the college had 
been helpful in the formation of the association. 

Thomas Libby, Bursar and Personnel Director 
of the College, said there was "absolutely no hos- 
tility (to the association), we gave them a free 
hand to organize or do whatever they wanted." 
He claims to have told the leaders of the associa- 
tion that his door would be open to any reasonable 
suggestions. "We pledged cooperation at the ini- 
tial discussion, but I haven't heard anything 
since." 

Mr. Allen felt that the association weakened 
after he left because most of the employees are 
reluctant to speak publicly, Ihey don't have much 
experience at this sort of activity and don't enjoy 
it. Pineite said that no one really has the time to 
go around organizing the workers and getting 
them to come to meetings. 

The flyer also stated: 

"Students are treated in the same way. With 
the excuse that someday we are all going to make 

big (a lie), the college pays us even less than 
the full time campus workers. Some students at 
the library start at $1.30 per hour. In the Union, 
students are paid $1.50 per hour. Many students 
are dependent upon campus jobs. With this large 
pool of cheap studentrlabor, the College can hire 
fewer full time workers at lower wages." 

Moulton, Director of Financial Aid, said the 
charge that student workers are used to keep the 
full time people, but in keeping with the policy of 
true. "It would be far more convenient to hire 
full-time people, but in keeping with the policy of 
providing as many different types of financial as- 
sistance as possible, the College has intentionally 
kept jobs for students." He contends that a lot 
of student jobs could be done more effectively by 
full time employees; "the job program is run for 
the convenience of students more than anyone 
else." 

Moulton admitted that students are paid less 
than full time employees in some cases, but he 
thought that equal wages would create friction 
between students and employees because of the 
difference in skills. According to Moulton, stu- 
dents are untrained, they are usually less produc- 
tive than full-time employees, job hours are ar- 
ranged to fit their academic schedule, and they 
sometimes don't bother to show up at work. 

On the other hand, students are not paid "cool- 
ey wages." All student wages meet the minimum 
of $1.45, and some students are paid more than 
full time employees. Three students on the fed- 
eral work-study program earn $3.00 an hour tu- 
toring and most student wages range from $1.45 
to $2.00 depending on the type of work. Moulton 
samples wages paid in the area in determining 
what students on the work-study program should 
bo paitl. •* 

One of the problems of student employment is 
that there is no central agency to which students 
and employers can turn to meet one another. One 
of the results of this is chaos in student wages. 
Student", working on different areas of the cam- 
pus, doing the same jobs are paid different wages. 
However, Moulton says that in about four months 
his office will have a proposal for a central employ- 
ment agency. 

Larry Pinette, Senior Center chef, said the 



workers donKt want 
He said that S.D.S. 
trouble and doesn't 



anything to do with S.D.S. 
is using the issue to stir up 
really care about the work- 
ers, or it would have tried to get the facts straight. 
He cited one instance in which the college suppos- 
edly tried to pay a woman who had been em- 
ployed for 15 years $1.55 an hour. According to 
Pinette the woman had been on leave of absence 
for a year and when she returned the computer is- 
sued her a check based on the old rate, but the 
mistake was corrected in the next check. 

On the matter of wages, Mr. Libby explained 
that the College makes periodic surveys to deter- 
mine what employees are being paid in the area. 
"The College tries to be competitive. This isn't 
to say we pay the highest wages in the world. 
There's room for improvement. . . . We've never 
been able to compete with civil service or the iron 
works, but we've remained reasonably competitive. 
. . . If we weren't competitive we wouldn't have 
some of the good people we have around here. 
We're reasonably successful in attracting good 
people." Libby pointed out that productive work- 
ers can move up the ladder very quickly., 

Both Pinette and Allen recognize the problems 
the College faces in trying to pay its employees, 
because of the absence of new sources of funds, 
but both men said that the entire area is depressed 
and Bowdoin pays as well as most employers in 
the vicinity. 

Pinette said one of the problems is separating 
ordinary gripes from real grievances. The Asso- 
ciation was formed because employees lost two 
traditionally paid holidays, Washington's Birthday 
and Patriots. One thing bothering workers is that 
the reason given was that these are not school 
holidays, but if this is the case employees may 
lose some of their other holidays whieh are also 
not school holidays. Another grievance concerns 
the college's medical plan,, but the college claims 
to be re-evaluating the plan and trying to come 
up with a better alternative. 

Mr. Wolcott Hokanson, Vice-President of the 
College, says the College's retirement plan is com- 
petitive as are the wages. He also noted other 
benefits college employees recieve. They have full 
use of facilities; they can get up to $1500 a year 
towards the college tuition of their children if 
they have worked for seven years ; the college nev- 
er lays off any of its employees. Hokanson re- 
marked that because there is no union contract the 
college can be flexible in helping employees. For 
example, the college has often continued non-job 
related medical benefits far past the requirement. 

Mr. Allen said that in the nine years he has 
worked for the college he could not remember a 
single instance in which the college has treated 
an employee unfairly. He added that there were 
numerous times the college had bent over back- 
wards to help employees. 



Allen Replies 



Dear Sirs: 

There appears to be some question as to whether 
the administration of the college and I have be- 
haved in an honorable fashion in the manner of my 
employment. The college made no offer to buy me 
and I made no offer to sell. In few matters am I an 
expert but in this instance I am the world's fore- 
most authority on what I did and did not do. 

My hours at the college are from 7 to 4 on week 
days. Many of my evenings are free. If any indi- 
vidual or group wishes to question me I would be 
happy to make myself available at a mutually con- 
venient time. 

' Very truly yours, 
RALPH J. ALLEN 



Politics Of Moratorium Debated 



By JOHN WEISS 

Student and faculty involvement 
in the October Moratorium em- 
phasized the fact that College Com- 
munities are becoming more in- 
volved in various levels of political 
and social activity. Preparations 
for the "second round*' of the Mor- 
atorium on November 13. 14, and 
15 arc already underway at Bow- 
doin and other colleges. 

Wednesday evening a group of 
interested students, teachers, and 
residents met at Professor Wil- 
liam Wliitesido's apartment to 
plan the November Moratorium. 
Economics Professor David 
Holmes explained the arrange- 
ments of the Washington based 
National Mobilization Committee 

Sometime on Saturday. Novem- 
ber 1"). representatives from even- 
state will march past the White 
House, each representative carry- 
ing the name of an American ser- 
viceman killed in the Vietnam 
war." "Maine has suffered 208 



deaths in the Vietnamese war. The 
T.nrrtittee in Augusta hopes to get 
nt least 208 representatives from 
Maine. The Brunswick area has 
been assigned a quota of thirty 
peopje. while fifty or sixty will 
come from Colby and Bates. Buses 
leaving from Brunswick will cost 
*22 round trip. Hotel accommoda- 
tions will be provided by the na- 
tional committee free of charge." 
Mr. Holmes stated that interested 
people should contact George 
Bowden in suit 15-C of the Senior 
Center. 

The discussion of the plans for 
the march in Washington pro- 
ceeded vcrv smoothly and without 
debate. When plans for action in 
Brunswick on November 13 were 
i scussed. fundamental differences 
r.f opinion became evident. Several 
people endorsed the idea of silent 
vigils for pence with the hope of 
eettinc out twice as many people 
as the October candlelight gather- 
ing. Other faculty and students at 



the meeting endorsed the idea of 
"personal confrontation" with 
students going door to door. An- 
other group supported the plan of 
establishing a local anti-war head- 
quarters for the purpose of "edu- 
cating as many people as pos- 
sible." Some of the group liked 
all of these. . . 

The proponents of mass peace- 
ful demonstrations hope that "five 
or six hundred on the mall might 
win over the marginal people. - ' 
The contend that even if the war 
is ended only a day sooner than it 
might have been because of the 
demonstrations, they will have 
been completely justifiable. 

The advocates of an educational- 
ly oriented anti-war center look 
beyond the Vietnamese war to the 
sicknesses in our society which 
permitted such prolonged tolera- 
tion of the war. They argue that 
unless fundamental changes in our 
foreign policy are effected Laotian 
(Pleoae turn to page 2) 



FRIDAY. OCTOBER 24. 1969 



i,HL BOWOOIN ORIENT 



PAGE FIVE 




CAMPl'S CILT1RE: Music and Bullet (See page 2) 



By RON CALITRI 

Another date we* ticked off Bowdoin'a musical 
calendar with the presentation of a concert of 
electronic music Wednesday afternoon and eve- 
ning at the Senior Center. The great success of 
last week's concert of American songs was echoed 
as the interesting program played to a practically 
empty hall. The organizers of the Concert, Pro- 
fessor Schwartz, David Gamper and John Johnson, 
presented a program intended to survey the entire 
field of electronic music; but only one hardy soul, 
your reporter, stayed for the entire presentation, 
which is not remarkable since it ran for six hours. . 

The general reaction to the program was one 
of mild interest. Very few of the people who 
managed to attend came without some sort of 
secondary entertainment; some slept, some work- 
ed, but almost no one just listened. The fault 
hardly lay with the program, which included works 
by such masters as Luciano Berio, John Cage, Karl- 
heinz Stockhausen, Eduard Varese, and Milton 
Babbitt. 

Electronic music is generally understood to have 
become a viable means of musical expression after 
the Second World War. The early practitioners, 
such as Schaeffer, and Henry, called their produc- 
tions "Musique Concrete," which they denned as 
natural sounds altered in the studio. An example 
given of this technique was the "Etude aux Che- 



min de Fer" by Pierre Schaeffer, which consists of 
the sounds of a train played at different speeds, 
backwards, spliced into different arrangements, 
etc. 

In the years since the original Musique Con- 
crete appeared, the means of producing electronic 
music have multiplied. . Electronically produced 
sounds have become more and more significant in 
modern pieces. They are produced by means as 
simple as signal generators which produce one- 
frequency sounds, or as complex as the famous 
Moog synthesizer which was used to produce 
"Switched on Bach." Recently men such as Milton 
Babbitt, who's "Ensembles for Synthesizer" was 
presented a! the concert, have begun to use com- 
puters to produce and order electronic sounds. 

Another means of producing electronic music 
is the combination of taped sounds with live per- 
formance. Luciano Berio's "Visages" and John 
Cage's "Aria and Fontana Mix" were two pieces 
in this style presented at the concert. Both fea- 
tured virtuoso singing performances. 

The success of the program can be measured by 
the reaction of the audience, which did not vis- 
ibly react. Certainly this is an indication of the 
veracity of the statement in the programme that, 
"Electronic music simply undertakes to express, 
by different means, human situations, ideas, and 
emotions." 



Loans Held Up Abbie Sells Pograms 



CPS -- A Congressional dead 
lock still is preventing enact- 
ment of the "emergency" insured 
student loan bill. The bill would 
give lenders an allowance of up 
to 3 per cent above the interest 
rate of 7 per cent that is allowed 
on the insured loans. 

The bill was drawn up when 
the prime interest rate rose to 
8% per cent this year. It was 
feared banks would not make 
loans to students because they 
would lose money on the 7 per 
cent insured interest limit. 

The Congressional snag in a 
Senate-House conference commit- 
tee has been over whether a 
lender could require a borrower 
to do business with his lending 
agency in order to receive a loan. 
House conferees charged the pro- 
vision would make the program 
unworkable. 

Despite the delay in passage, 
the U.S. Office of Education says 
the volume of loans remains high. 
In August $155 million was com- 
mitted by lenders for the loans, 
as compared to $133 million in 
August, 1968. 



CPS . — Television situation 
comedy has never had it so good 
as Chicago has it today with the 
trial of the Chicago Eight. And 
while the antics are coming from 
both sides of the bench, Judge 
Julius Hoffman is stealing the 
show. 

At one point, for example, 
Hoffman called for the trial to 
proceed, but was enlightened by 
the defense council , to the fact 
that the jury was not seated. 
"Oh, yes, I forgot about that," 
the 74 year old judge said. 

Later in the trial, the judge 
was involved in a discussion with 
the prosecution about some re- 
printed matter. "There ought to, 
be a law against xerox machines," 
he declared. 

"Why not, there's one against 
everything else," Abbie Hoffman 
retorted. 

Abbie was showing off the of- 
ficial "pogram" of the trial: the 
Chicago Eight vs. "The Washing- 
ton Kangaroos." Why was the 
program published? "You can't 
tell the players without a po- 
gram," Abbie explained. 



About the outcome of the ball 
game, Abbie said, "We're going to 
win every day but the last." 
Renee Davis offered his respect 
for the judge: "He's a fool. They 
really brought up the best man 
for this one." 

Abbie added, "He's straight out 
of Central Casting." 

The defendants have spent a 
good deal of their time opening 
mail. Each defendant has been 
averaging 50 pieces of mail a day. 
Abbie has also been reading "Zat" 
comics in the court room. 

"We're getting more mail than 
Perry Como," Hoffman (Abbie) 
said. "I even got a letter from my 
ex- wife, and she's going to help." 

Jerry Rubin said he didn't ex- 
pect a mistrial to be called, but 
expected the trial to last three 
years in appeal. 

Davis was not so optimistic: 
"This judge is going to see this 
right to the end. He's going to 
get crazier and crazier. He'll 
probably start cross examining 
us himself. So we're working on 
stopping the trial; we'll focus our 
reasoning on the judge." 



Chicago: Kids And Cops 

By RICK FITCH 
College Pr«>ss Service 

The lirst hint came on the airport bus Wednesday "afternoon riding 
into the Loop. Mixed in anions the grey -suited businessmen were sev- 
eral obviously not headed for the Holiday Inn or the Conrad Hilton. 
They wore jeans, heavy boots and Army Jackets and carried sleeping 
bags and motorcycle helmets. And some were girls! Their faces re- 
mained transfixed in rigid silence, even when the bus passed! a sign 
reading, "Welcome to Chicago Richard J. Daley, Mayor." 

A second hint came during a walk along the Lake Michigan shore 
that evening in the vicinity of Lincoln Park. It was cool, dark and re- 
freshing.- Where was the revolution? The forms of a dozen or so per- 
sons became visible 100 yards down the beach. Running. Closer in- 
spection revealed all were attired in the aforementioned get-up. Some 
had wooden clubs; one carried a Viet Cong flag. Their helmeted heads 
bobbed quietly past, and up and over a highway footbridge leading to 
the city. 

No more hints were necessary. Conclusive proof that a new sort of 
radical had surfaced for "bring the war home" demonstrations here 
Oct. 8-11 was to follow. Three days, 200 arrests, 50 injuries and 2,500 
National Guard troops later, people would wonder if the new radical's 
emergence forshadowed future directions of the U.S. protest move- 
ment, or if everything had been stopped then and there in Chicago. 
A brief account of the events follows : 

Wednesday - 10:30 p.m., some 300 rock-throwing demonstrators 
chanting "off the pig," spill out of a Lincoln Park rally into the Gold 
Coast and Old Town sections of the city's Near North Side, breaking 
hundreds of windows, damaging luxury cars and engaging police in 
several free-for-alls as they go. At 11:15, the action subsides. Seventy- 
five arrested, 18 injured, including 10 police and three protestors 
wounded by gunshot. 

Thursday — 10:30 a.m., 100 women assemble in Grant Park, bat- 
tleground on the 1968 Democratic Convention disorders, to begin 
marching to military induction center downtown. Are halted by police 
demanding they surrender clubs and helmets. Shouting, "Pigs, pigs," 
women charge police line of 25. Fifty more police arrive, women sub- 
dued. Eleven arrested live police injured. Noon, 300 attend peaceful 
rally outside Federal Building, where "Chicago 8" are undergoing 
trial. Protest incarceration of political prisoners. 3 p.m., 200 rally on 
lawn adjacent to International Harvester plant to protest its closing. 
Illinois Gov. Richard Ogilivie calls out the National Guard. Daley calls 
for those arrested to be charged with felonies. 

Friday - 2:30 p.m., 200 rally at Cook County Hospital to protest 
discrimination in medical treatment of minority groups. 

Saturday - 2 a.m., 43 demonstrators arrested in police raid on 
Kvanston church. One |*m., 3,000 attend anti-war rally at Humboldt 
Park on the North Side after march through Black, Latin and white 
working class neighborhoods. One-thirty p.m., 200 begin march from 
Haymarkclj-Square to Grant Park, break into a run through the fi- 
nancial district, throwing rocks and bricks, scuffling fiercely with po- 
lice. 100 arrested, 24 cops, v 3 officials hurt. *. - 

Most participants in the demonstrations shared a common ideologi- 
cal bond. They saw the Vietnam war, military draft, oppression of 
Blacks, Chicanos and Indians, and exploitation of workers in the U.S. 
not as isolate J injustices perpetrated by a basically benign govern- 
ment, but as manisfestations of a capitalist system intrinsically evil. 
Where the radicals split was over the issue of tactics. The Weather- 
men, a militant faction, came to Chicago figuring that to be most ef- 
fective in bringing about the revolution, they would have to band to- 
gether in a kind of white students vanguard and confront with force 
the force-welding agents of the establishment. 

The Revolutionary Youth Movement (RYM), Black Panthers, Young 
Patriots and Young Lords, on the other hand, prepared for the pro- 
ceedings under the assumption that to engage in violent skirmishes 
would be premature, since support for revolutionary goals thus far 
has come from a small portion of the population, the youth and mi- 
nority groups, and hasn't involved the poor and working class to a 
meaningful extent. 

The dispute over tactics was reflected in the manner and mood of 
actions pursues October 8-11. The Weathermen were responsible for 
the more militant actions, the first night's rampage through town, the 
women's charge at police, the hit and run assault on the financial dis- 
trict. 

RYM and the other groups aimed their activities toward building up 
a broad base of support on all fronts. The International Harvester 
rally, for example, was called to protest that company's decision to 
shut down a Chicago tractor works factory, leaving 4,000 laborers, 
1,700 Black, out of work. It drew a smattering of plant workers. 

The messages national leaders had for followers prior to the dem- 
onstrations contained insights into the temperament and thinking of 
both the new radicals (SDS Weathermen), and the traditional radi- 
cals (RYM). 

- In SDS New Left Notes, those intending to go to Chicago were pro- 
vided instructions on how to treat a wide range of injuries — every- 
thing from gas poisoning to internal wounds caused by gunshot — 
with "street medicine." They were warned not to bring dope (because 
its presence among a group of people invites a bust), not to bring 
cars (because dope could be planted on them), and not to use the ser- 
vices of hospitals ("Off the pig — not just the one with the gun, but 
the one with the medical bag."). They were told to come to Chicago 
in "affinity groups" of 5-10 persons for the purpose of undertaking 
guerilla actions. 



Prof Trisolini's Interpretation Bridges Language Gap 



(Continued from page 1) 

Cavafy's poems are condemned as erotic and sensual, 
they actually are esoteric and senuous. About his 
passion for Caesarion Cavafy explains: "My art gives 
your features a dreamy compassionate beauty." Cava- 
fy's poetic statement is personal, but not pathetically 
so as in the Spasmodic Poets, whose explicitness is per- 
verse. Cavafy's poetic vision is not perverted, but 
rather inverted. He wrote of the Hellenistic, not the 
Homeric, tradition. -Perhaps his finest poem is "The 
God Abandons Antony," in which with a tribute to 
pleasure and enjoyment the poet advises not really 
Antony, but himself, to "bid her farewell, t/he Alex- 
andria that is leaving . '. . the Alexandria you are los- 
ing," the Alexandria of which he distinguished the 



pervading spirit — its tarnished sophistication, its con- 
tinual sexual intrigues and ambiguities. The nature of 
Cavafy's inversion of the heroic and of his individual 
viewpoint is well-stated in Pharoa and Pharillon by 
E. M. Forster, who introduced Cavafy's works to Eliot, 
Lawrence and other influential writers of the English- 
speaking world, and who described Cavafy as "a 
Greek gentleman in a straw hat, standing absolutely 
motionless at a slight angle to the universe." 

That angled vision was well presented by Dr. Triso- 
lini, who bears the titles of Professor and Chairman 
of the Department of Comparative Arts and also As- 
sociate Dean of the College of Fine Arts at Ohio Uni- 
versity. .Long inteiested in speech and oral interpre- 
tation, Trisolini feels tihat one must "surrender to the 



poem" and must exercise "momentary suspension of 
personal beliefs" in order to give a meaningful inter- 
pretation. Dr. Trisolini came to Bowdoin once before 
as a consultant for a national project for the im- 
provement of televised teaching. He stated in the in- 
formal discussion following his lecture and readings 
that Kis former trip to Maine was a "boondoggle." 
This last one was not. When told that there was an 
SDS meeting at the same time as the reading, he ex- 
pressed regret not so much for the scheduling conflict 
as for the fact that SDS students have comprised his 
best audiences. Hopefully in the future poetry read- 
ings like Dr. Trisolini's, which was arranged by Mr*. 
Minister, who is giving a Senior Seminar cu oral in- 
terpretation, will not encounter an audience so sparse, 
and so removed. m 



PAGR SIX 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1969 



r 



When on Long Island 
Be Sure to Visit 



THE LAURAINE MURPHY 

RESTAURANT 



1445 Northern Blvd. Manhasset 



and 



> 






THE MILLERIDGE INN 



^» 



JERICHO 



One of Long Island 9 s Famous 
Old Inns Established 1672 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 




THE GAME . . . half a century ago. 



College football's 100th 



Bowdoin Football Fanfare, pre-1915 



By MARTIN FRIEDLANDER 

I 
Orient Sports Editor 

(Ed. Note: This is the second of a two 
part series on the history of football at 
Bowdoin, in 'commemoration of college 
football's 100th anniversary. The first part 
of the series may be found in the first issue 
of this year, and deals with the initial 
growth stages of the sport at Bowdoin up 
until the time of Bowdoin's first intercol- 
legiate game, played in 1889 against 
Tufts.) 

Dazzled by their initial contact with 
competitive football against Tufts (an 8-4 
loss), the 'Bowdoin' scheduled another 
game a month later. On November 2, 1889, 
the early gridders enjoyed their first vic- 
tory as they downed Boston Latin, 44-0, in 
the first football gave ever seen in Bruns- 
wick. According to Dr. Frank Whittier, 
vice-president of the then newly formed 
Bowdoin Football Association, "The home 
team won an easy victory, the Latin boys 
being unable to do anything with our heavy 
j|sh line." 

'♦The first game in Brunswick attracted 
much attention, this build up from ac- 
counts of bruised and bloody football 
bodies in early 'Ivy League' games. The 
Orient reassured the students, "The blood- 
thirsty accounts of the last football fight 
between Yale and Princeton should not 
alarm our novices, as this is a highly 
evolved form of the game which we can 
not hope to reach for some years." The 
Orient's prognosis was not to hold true for 
very long. 

In 1890, Bowdoin entered a league which 
included MIT, Amherst, Dartmouth, and 
Williams. The first two championship 
games saw annihilation of:*<he'£ewdpin 
squad by Dartmouth andC^©lliam<«Uy 
scores of 42-0 and SO-O.-^fespeetiveTy. 



m 



Hatch's History comments, "The league 
games with Amherst and MIT were not 
played. Our team was so badly crippled af- 
ter the Williams game that it was thought 
best to forfeit the game with Amherst." 
The same year also saw the first Harvard- 
Bowdoin game. Bowdoin got the short end 
of the stick, losing, 54-0. The Boston pa- 
pers called the Brunswick players, "giants, 
but the lack of blocking and clean tackling 
was painful." 

In-state competition started in 1892 
when Bowdoin met Colby on October 15 
and really kicked the Mules, 52-0. Maine 
fell next in 1893, thought not so emphati- 
cally — they lost 12-10. Bates gave Bow- 
doin her first loss to a Maine college, de- 
feating the Bears 10-6 in 1897 v 

With the turn of the century also came 
a turn in the tide of Bowdoin football for^ 
tunes. The squad defeated Amherst and 
Tufts, played Harvard and Yale, and 
achieved what the Orient termed "the 
most satisfactory season in Bowdoin's his- 
tory." Only Yale, Harvard, and Brown en- 
joyed superior ratings to Bowdoin in the 
estimation of the New England critics. 

Even in 1903 the Orient somehow man- 
aged to turn a field loss into a moral vic- 
tory - for the gridders. In that year the 
Orient reported the 23-0 loss to Amherst 
as follows: "The score does not tell the 
story by any means, of how the light team 
from Bowdoin held Amherst's heavy line 
for downs on the one yard line, of the bril- 
liant, yet desperate playing of Captain 
Bean, or of the wonderful fight of the 
crippled Bowdoin backs." 

There was' a somewhat more rewarding 

form of resolute play against Bates later 

>on:"in the 1&03 season. Commented, (he 

#Opent, "Tff<^K4me was -nearfy over, the 

:«c*e 5-5,-*fiKfh *feh>>yard*'to gafct. Bow- . *. 



dbin braced and held like a stone wall, tak- 
ing the ball on downs. Never was such a 
fierce attack on a Brunswick team made. 
In six rushes, 39 yards were gained. Kins- 
man was given (he ball, Finn and Fernald 
opened a good hole, and Kinsman was off 
like a shot, running through and over his 
opponents at race horse siwed, winning a 
touchdown and the game." Low scores 
were the style in ensuing seasons, as such 
scores as Bowdoin 6-Tufts 0, Bowdoin 3- 
Amherst 0, and Bowdoin 0-Weslcyan 
came out of Ihcir rcs|>ectivc yean*. How- 



ever, by 1915, Bowdoin was back on her 
old course and lost magnificently to Colby, 
54-6. 

The t rend since 1915 has not been a very 
unique one, and the old time fanfare sur- 
rounding the early games seems to have 
cither vanished with the past, moved on 
to the Big Ten contests, or found its way 
into the hockey arena. The Bears meet 
Colby Saturday in what one hopes will not 
bear any resemblance to the contest of 
1915. \ 




Then strip, lads, and to it, though sharp he the weather. 

And if, b\ mischance, \ou should happen to fall, 
There. are worse things in life than a tumble mi heather. 
And lif.e is itself but a game at football. . . . .Sir Waller Scott 



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PE APPROVED DANCE CLASSES 

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ARGONAUT 
CRAFTS 

Gurnet Bridge 

Brunswick, Maine 

Century old shop at Gurnet 
Bridge's rushing tide. Owners 
live alongside in 1912 boat 
year around. 

Unique oak slab tables seen 
made on premises — Unusual 
gifts — Touch of the nautical 
— Exotic Imports — Maine 
Crafts — Surfboards — Lob- 
ster Traps and Buoys. 

In the 

Heart of 

"Beautiful Downtown Gurnet" 

on Route No. 24 

3 Miles South of Cook's Corner 

10-5 MON. thru SAT. 



PAGE EIGHT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



F RID'AY. OCIOBKR 14, 1969 



— 




Sailors in Top Two of Nine; 
Travel For Finals Saturday 



By BENJY WHITCOMB 
Orient Sport* Writer 

Last Saturday the Bowdoin sailing team raised 
itself In one of the strongest positions among New 
England college teams as it placed second in the 
sloop semi-finals at Coast Guard in New -London, 
Connecticut. This rank enabled the team to quali- 
fy for the final eliminations this Saturday and 
Sunday, again at '"oast Guard, along with a strong 
MIT team which finished first in Bowdoin's division 
races. 

Near Wipe Out 

Racing 22 foot "Ravens.'* the Hears averaged a 
'third place finish per race in six neats despite a 
hull speed collision with the University of Connec- 
ticut where the huskies almost wiped out Bow- 
doin's number one spinnaker man, Tom Berry. One 
last dead last' finish also saw the Bears at odds 
when they were caught in a freak flat spot. Com- 
modore Vaughan kept the team driving along, 



Photo by l>»v* Sperlinn 

I'l NNIXG • • is another quarter- 
back, Boh Foley. 

Parents Will 
See Gridders 
Host Colby 

By CHRIS PIERCE 

Orient Sports Writer 

Led by senior halfback. 
Jack Maitland, Williams coun- 
tered a mid-game Bowcioin 
rush with two final' period 
touchdowns to defeat the Po- 
F lar Bears, 28-17, last Saturday 
at Williams' Weston Field. 

Williams dominated- the first 
period and a half, scoring two 
touchdowns; one by Maitland on 
a nine yard run, and the other by 
Dave Kubie, who scored three in 
the game. The sluggish Bowdoin 
offense retaliated with a 40 yard 
field (goal by Captain John Dela- 
hanty, tying the New England 
record for most held goals in a 
career at 12. The Polar Bears, 
down 14-3, then produced a sus- 
tained drive of 80 yards to nar- 
row the deficit to three at the 
half, Mike Jackson scoring from 
seven yards out. 

Bowdoin took the second half 
kickoff on their own 13 and mov- 
ed the remainder of the distance 
with John Demenkoff and Mike 
Denoncour doing most of the 
running, Denoncour took a pitch- 
Out from Qdarterback Bob Foley 
for the final 13 and Bowdoin was 
on top, 17-14. However, Williams 
started to gain the momentum 
which Bowdoin had had and push- 
ed over their third touchdown at 
12:26 of the final stanza. The last 
score came with 16 seconds to go 
to produce the final tally. 

Bowdoin rnoved the ball better 
than it has all year, with John 
Demenkoff gaining 172 yards in 
19 carries, and Paul Wiley catch- 
ing three aerials for 102 yards. 
However, Williams had 335 yards 
in rushing, The Bears will have 
to sullen their defenses for a 
young Colby team that stars nu- 
merous freshmen.' Among them 
arc quarterback Brian Cone who 
has thrown six touchdown passes 
this season, and Dave Yane who 
scored three against Trinity last 
week and was named to the All-. 
Star ECAC Small College Team. 



however, as they finished strongly with two sec- 
onds and a third. in the last three heats. 

The team showed an awareness of the sport's 
technicalities, as they won all five protests they 
were involved in; this should stand them in good 
' "stead for the .tight competition this weekend. Be- 
hind MIT and Bowdoin Ifi'the final ranking .of the 
teams at the end of last weekend's races were: 
Corby (third), I'N'H (fourth), Coast Guard No! 1 
(fifth), I' Conn (sixth), Coast Guard No. 2 (sev- 
enth), and Babson (eighth). 

Same Crew Return* 
Raring for the Rears last weekend, and also re- 
turning t<> New London for the finals, are skipper 
Boh \ 'augaan and crew members Tom Perry, Ben- 
' tfe Whitcomb, and Gecrfife Marvin. This marks 
the first time in six years the Bowdoin team has 
made it to the New Kngland Intercollegiate Sailing 
Association iNKISA), and with the good fortune 
of avoiding last week's flukes, should give a good 
performance. , 





4 



i 




t 



THE 'KAVKNS.* Tom Berry (right photo) and other unidentified sailors compete in laat weekends sloops 
semi-finals. The team placed second, bringing them back again this weekend for finals competition, the 
first such return for Bowdoin in si\ years. ___ 

Second Ephorts Kill Bears; 
Snowed Under in Lewiston 



■ By BRIAN DAVIS 
- Orient Sports Writer 

After a victorious first half last 
Saturday at Williamstown, the 
Polar Bears hooters were held 
"scoreless while the Ephs tallied 
twice in the second period to deal 
Bowdoin her third one-point loss 
this season. In more recent ac- 
tion, the varsity squad traveled to 
Lewiston Wednesday, where they 
were beaten by Bates and the 
snow, 3-1. 

The encounter with Williams 
was played in windy and cool, 
overcast conditions. The first half 
saw several scoring attempts by 
both teams, but only Bowdoin 
managed to -capitalize. The goal 
came in the first period when, 
with the wind at his back, right 
wing Jim Burnett shot over the 
outstretched arms of the 'Ephs' 
goalie. With the wind now behind 
them, Williams first score came 
late in the third period. On a 
cross, the right inside headed the 
ball through the crowd in front 
of the goal to tie the score. The 
winning goah was netted in the 
fourth quarter when an alert Eph 
inside deflected a wide shot from 



the center halfback. One Bear 
cited a lack. of organized practice 
with a full team during the previ- 
cus week as a determining factor 
in the loss to Williams. 

The Lewiston snowbout' was 
the scene of Bowdoin's second 



period proved fruitless for both 
teams. Roger Bevan picked up 
the scoring for the Bears from 
just outside the penalty area in 
the third period. However, Bates 
rolled in two more scores in the 
same quarter during more con- 



consecutive defeat. Bates rallied v gested play in front of the Bear 
quickly artd scored, on a direct goal. Fine ball control by the 
kick through both snow and Bow- snow dominated play in thefourth 
doin's defensive wall. The second period. 





Photo by Dav* Sperling 

PASSING.. . . is quarterback 
John Benson. 

Williams Runs 
Over Harriers 
Last Weekend 



By ED STIAKT 

Orient Sports Writer 

Mark Cuneo gained his third 
first place of the season by out- 
running a second place Williams 
harrier last Saturday' in Wil- 
liamstown. Despite his finish, and 
the third place grabbed by his 
bn.ther, Ken, the Bears fell by a 
score of -26-33 tor their second 
loss of the season. Steve Moriarty 
finished sixth, placing three of the 
five varsity runners in the top 
scoring positions. 

The Bears presently have five 
runners competing from a start- 
ing roster of eleven. Juniors Toby 
Coverdale and Bill Lever, both 
members of record-setting relay 
teams last season , are out with 
leg injuries. Sophomore Deke Tal- 
bot is in a Bangor hospital with 
an intestinal ailment. 

Tomorrow the varsity harriers 
host Colby. -The Mules are faced 
with similiar staffing problems,, 
but lack in depth rather than 
numbers. Last week Colby took 
third in a four-team meet with 
Springfield, New Brunswick, and 
Brandeis. The Mules outran 
Brandeis, a school not known for 
its excellence in athletics. Colby- 
was missing one of its leading 
runners, Bob Hickey, due to in- 
juries, but did take a third With 
their captain, Craig Johnson, 
clocking a time of 26:38 for Col- 
by's five-mile course. 



Hunting In Maine 



Wide Variety of Game Here 



Hut now its just another, show, 

you leave them laughing w*hen you go. 
And ij yon rare don't let them know . . . 

don't give yourself away — 

^ . . Joni Mitchell 



By STEVEN KENNEDY 
Orient Hunter 

An ever 'increasing number of students over the 
past few years have rediscovered one of the finest 
attribute's of Bowdoin's location. These students, 
in groups of twos and threes, have been taking 
advantage of the fine hunting available within easy 
reach of the college . . . and the variety of hunt- 
ing is among the best in New Kngland. 

The big game hunter can test his skills against 
the bears of upstate Maine or the wjiite-tailed- deer 
which are found in all the wooded areas surround- 
ing Brunswick. The white-tailed is noted for its 
weariness, and a buck with a good rack would 
make a fine trophy for any sportsman. 
Early Season Hunting 

As the deer season in the southern zone is not 
yet cpen, most of the attention of the Bowdoin 
hunters has been directed to the famed water- 
fowl hunting of Merrymeeting Bay and upland 



bird shooting. Duck hunters have found the ducks 
of the first season to be plentiful and make for a 
test of marksmanship. A green-winged teal may 
attain speeds of 50-60 m°ph on wing. Despite this 
speed, many students have sharpened their shoot- 
ing ability and are enjoying several duck dinners. 
Upland Game Birds Scarce 

The upland game birds have not been here in 
great numbers this year, perhaps due to the se- 
vere weather conditions of last spring. Woodcock, 
grouse, and pheasant have provided some good 
shooting for those who ha\e gained the experience 
necessary to locate them. 

Many of the local citizens of Brunswick who 
have learned of the student interest in hunting 
have been generously going out of their* way to 
provide information and equipment needed for the 
sport. With the opening of the deer season No- 
vember 1 and of the second tluck season, many 
Bowdoin hunters will again be taking to the wood*. 



< 



j&^ 



Pastoral Utopia Proves Provocative But Impractical 



By JAY SWEET 

It is said that there 1 is nothing as powerful as an idea 
whose time is come; it is equally true that there is noth- 
ing as pathetic as an idea whose time is past. Wednes- 
day night, Socialist author Scott Nearing presented to 
this community an idea whose time is long past; and 
although ones respect for the man remained undimin- 
ished, his lecture only emphasized problems that it 
sought to solve. 

Nearing is now eighty-six years old. A Doctor of Phil- 
osophy, he has chosen as his life style for the last thirty- 
six years subsistence farming, first in Vermont and now 
in Maine. He retains the vitality and personal grace of 
a man perhaps half his age. But it is his faithful dedica- 
tion to the pastoral life that creates the artificial ties 
in his thought. 

His analysis of the present state of American society 
differs little from that of the newer left. It is his posi- 
tion that the United States is dominated by a Military- 
Industrial Complex which originated at the end of the 
First World War and has multiplied its power un- 
checked since that time. The pattern of political and 
economic imperialism which has flowered into the Viet 
Nam War was established as early as 1899 by the United 



States' conquest of the Philippines. This country must 
not, he believes, allow itself the continued luxury of the 
myth of the Super-Power. Our policiesFare as unwise as 
they are immoral. Power must be wrested from the in- 
terested few. This struggle can, he feels, find success 
short of violent revolution. Nearing refuses to accept 
Guevara's dictim that "Revolution comes from the bar- 
rel of a Gun." His revolution must proceed according to 
the principle of the least harm to the least number, and 
the greatest good for the greatest number. Its end, he 
claimed, will be "the burning of the rookeries," the 
cities; a return to a pastoral ideal of breathable air, 
drinkable water, and respect and dignity for every man. 
This is a tempting proposition, and the temptations 
are anly reinforced by the character of their disciple 
Nearing is a walking testimonial to the benefits of co- 
existence with Nature. Both the route to the ideal and 
the ideal itself, however, seem drastically inadequate in 
terms of modern reality. When asked how to begin the 
attack on the Military-Industrial Complex, Mr. Nearing 
responded with the example of the Quaker activists 
before the American Civil War who walked from 
plantation to plantation preaching the evils of slavery, 
the fact remains that when that revolution came, it 
came from the barrel of a gun, precisely what Nearing 



hopes to avoid. A second point questioned was the 
navete involved in proposing a pastoral ideal in view 
of the realities of the great urban center and a geomet- 
rically increasing population. Nearing responded that 
only the number of men who can survive in pastoral 
harmony should eventually remain on this earth. Fur- 
ther, he cites statistics demonstrating that among high 
school graduates, the birth rates and death rates are 
equal, and among college graduates the death rate is 
actually greater. By his logic, then, more education 
means less people. Even if this statistically improbable 
legerdemain is practicable, the problems of educating 
the population of India, for instance, seem to prohibit 
it as any immediate solution to the problem of birth 
control. Beyond that the ethics of limiting a world 
population to the number who can comfortably and 
serenely live off the fruits of the earth are frightening. 
Perceiving the horror of the cities is a necessity, but the 
answer would seem to be better cities rather than none 
at all. In short, Nearing personifies the attraction and 
Although this piece of advice was clearly allegorical, 
virtue of a life close to nature, but fails completely in 
his application of the lessons of that life to the common 
ills of society. It is an unfortunate truth that a good life 
universalised does not define the good society. 



THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 



VOLUME XCIX 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1969 



NUMBER 5 



Medicare Under Fire 
From Dr. Cronkhite 



By SAUL. GREENFIELD 

This year- the college is offering 
an interdepartmental course in- 
volving the Economics, History, 
Art, Sociology and Gov't and Le- 
gal Studies departments. It is 
titled "The Urban Crisis." In con- 
junction with this course a series 
of lectures and films is being of- 
fered. 

Another lecture was presented 
by the Urban Crisis course on the 
28 of October. Dr. Leonard 
Cronkhite, '41, Director of Chil- 
dren's Hospital Medical Center, 
Boston, spoke on "Urban Health 
and Health Care." Dr. Cronkhite 
is a member of the Board of Over- 
seers at Bowdoin, a Major Gen- 
eral in the Reserves and Lecturer 
in Preventative Medicine at Har- 
vard Medical School. He serves 
on many government committees. 
He is chairman of the Massachu- 
setts Medical Assistance Advisory 
Council and serves on an advisory 
board of the H.E.W. He has pub- 
lished many articles, one recent 
one being, "Life support Systems 
for Space Travel." 

Dr. Cronkhite's exposition 
brought to light many shocking 
facts. He mentioned that there 

Howell Declares 



are approximately 40 million resi- 
dents of what he termed the "core 
city" who are receiving what 
amounts to no medical care at all. 
This figure represents about 20% 
of the total population. It's been 
calculated that a doctor who sets 
up a storefront Medicare practice 
that grosses over $100,000 spends 
an average of 47 seconds of time 
on each patient. He called this 
situation an "organized malprac- 
tice mileu." Obviously most doc- 
tors don't choose to practice in the 
inner city because of the econom- 
ics of the situation. Dr. Cronkhite 
pointed out that many doctors 
won't practice in slum areas be- 
cause their own backgrounds con- 
flict with the backgrounds of their 
patients. Eighty percent of all 
medical students are from fami- 
lies of the upper 20% income 
bracket of this country. Dr. 
Cronkhite also emphasized that 
recruiting medical students from 
the ghetto area did no good be- 
cause they had no desire to prac- 
tice there. They have the same 
aspirations as any other man and 
suburbia is their goal. Dr. Cronk- 
hite said that the Medicare pro- 
- (Please torn to page 3) 




Dr. Leonard Cronkhite lectured on Urban Health 
Care as part of the Urban Crisis Course. 



Scott Nearing, socialist author, spoke on Reform 
or Revolution in a Senior Center lecture. 



Center Opening Soon; 
All Students Welcome 



By MARC BLESOFF 

Sometime within the next three 
weeks, the Bowdoin African- 
American Center is slated to 
open. With the approach of its 
opening, the Afro-Am Center is 
shrouded in what could be termed 
'mystery,' a condition due to both 
misunderstanding and a lack of 
communication. Few students 



Futuristics to Enhance Liberal Arts 



By ALAN KOLOD 

In his inaugural address, President Roger How- 
ell, Jr. recommended that Bowdoin establish a chair 
in futuristic studies. At the present, Howell and 
other members of the administration are studying 
what form futuristic studies should take and how a 
program could be financed. According to Howell, 
futuristics is an inter-disciplinary field which at- 
tempts to do for social problems what the Rand 
Corporation does for military planning. "Instead 
of asking what happens if a nuclear bomb falls on 
Los Angeles," Howell explained, "we ask questions 
about pollution and the urban crisis." 

One of the purposes of futuristics is to eliminate 
the time lag between scientific and technological 
advances and our ideas of how to employ them hu- 
manely. Howell used the example of organ trans- 
plants which raise problems not strictly medical, 
but legal, moral and sociological. Futurists start 
from the hypothesis that a certain advance has been 
made and then try to determine all the conse- 
quences it will have in all aspects of life. 



Howell thinks that one of the problems of con- 
temporary planning is that it considers only the 
more immediate and obvious consequences of an 
action. But he is careful to emphasize that futuris- 
tics is not a science. It helps us to discern trends 
and plan away from undesirable ones, but it is ba- 
sically the art of conjecture. The defenders of fu- 
turistics contend that conjecture is as valid an in- 
tellectual activity as experimentation and intellec- 
tual analysts. But conjecture must be done humane- 
ly and cautiously; it cannot become wild, science- 
fiction guessing. v l 

Howell believes futuristic studies are relevant to 
undergraduate education because they can create a 
style of thought which the liberal arts have al- 
ways sought to achieve but are failing at. The pres- 
ent liberal arts education is not creating people who 
feel at home in several disciplines and consider the 
various consequences of current trends in history. 
There has been too much emphasis on understand- 
ing how we got into problems to the exclusion of 
understanding how to solve and avoid problems. 



realize how the Center will affect 
them or of what the Center's pro- 
gram will consist. 

There is speculation that the 
Afro-American Center will be 
nothing more than a black frater- 
nity practicing reverse discrim- 
ination. When queried on this 
point, Ashley Streetman, assistant 
to the President, replied emphat- 
ically that the Center will not be 
a black fraternity, but will be 
open to and will benefit the en- 
tire campus. Mr. Streetman 
pointed to an African-American 
library, a record library, and vari- 
ous lectures and seminars as just 
a few of the activities at the Cen- 
ter open to both blacks and 
whites. Aside from their extra- 
curricular offerings, there will be 
regular academic courses taught 
at the Center. 

Mr. Streetman cited Reginald 
Lewis' current seminar as a con- 
crete benefit of the Center. Every 
• Wednesday evening, Mr. Lewis 
and thirty townspeople gather for 
a seminar on African-American 
history. The seminar was original- 
ly slated for the Afro-American 
Center, but due to the delayed 
opening of the renovated Mitchell 
House, it is being held in the Se- 
nior Center. 

Many students have questioned 
the administration's silence con- 
cerning the Afro-American Cen- 
ter, and there has been an appar- 
( Please tarn to page t) 



Administrators, 
Students Will 
Address Alumni 

The tenth annual ^combined fall 
conference of the Alumni Coun- 
cil and Directors and Agents of 
the Alumni Fund will be held on 
the campus Thursday through 
Saturday, Alumni Secretary 
Glenn K. Richards announced. 

The program will include a din- 
ner Friday evening in the Mbulton 
Union Lounge, where presenta- 
tion of Alumni Fund awards will 
be made, and Saturday morning 
ceremonies naming Bowdoin's 
new gymnasium in memory of the 
late Malcolm E. Morrell '24. Wives 
of delegates will be guests at a 
tea between 4:15 and 5:30 p.m. 
Friday at the home of President 
and Mrs. Roger Howell, Jr. 

The conference will begin 
Thursday with a meeting of the 
Council's Executive Committee 
from 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the Alumni 
House. Committee meetings will 
follow. The Friday morning sched- 
ule includes meetings of various 
Council committees in the Alum- 
ni House and a meeting of the 
Fund Directors in Hawthorne- 
Longfellow Hall. Council Presi- 
dent Lawrence Dana '35 of Cum- 
berland Foreside, Me., will preside 
at a noon luncheon in the Moul- 
ton Union, which will be followed 
by more committee meetings and 
meetings of the Fund Agents and 
Directors. At 3 p.m. Friday the 
Alumni Council will hold Its reg- 
( Please turn to page t) 



K 



PAGE TWO 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, i 969 




ARGONAUT 
CRAFTS 

Garnet Bridge 
Brunswick, Maine 

Century old shop at Gurnet, 
Bridge's rushing tide. Owners 
live alongside in 1912 boat 
year around. 

Unique oak slab tables seen 
made on premises — Unusual 
gits — Touch of the nautical 
— Exotic imports — Maine 
Crafts — Surfboards — Lob- 
ster Traps and Buoys. 

In the 

Heart of 

"Beautiful Downtown Gurnet" 

on Route No. 24 

3 Miles South of Cook's Corner 

10-5 MON. thru SAT. 



Greene Chapel 

Bowdoin College paid its re- 
spects to the memory of Profes- 
sor and Mrs. Theodore M. Greene 
at a chapel service Wednesday 
morning. Professor Howell opened 
the ceremony for the professor 
and his wife, who died in a fire 13 
August, by reading Proverbs, 
Chapter 9. Professor William 
Whiteside, Director of the Senior 
Center, delivered a eulogy in 
which,, he praised Professor 
Greene's qualities as a teacher 
and human being. Greene, who 
received an honorary degree from 
Bowdoin in 1968, was "quiet, 
thoughtful, witty, sensitive." "His 
achievement of a certain serenity 
was a tribute to his courage." "He 
gave much of himself to marly stu- 
dents and many colleges." 



Stowe Travel 

Thanksgiving Bus 

Non-Stop to Boston 

November 26 

Leaves Moulton Union at 1 p.m. 

9 PLEASANT STREET 
BRUNSWICK 

(Call Stowe For Reservations) 
(No Signing Up — No Obligation) 



Grad Council 
To Convene 

(Continued from page 1) 

ular fall meeting in the Council 
Room of the Alumni House. 

Addressing the Class Agents 
and Fund Directors at 4 p.m. in 
Sills Hall will be President How- 
ell; Professor Albert Abrahamson, 
Dean of the Faculty; Wolcott A. 
Hokanson, Jr., Vice President for 
Administration and Finance; Jos- 
eph Jefferson, Vice President for 
Development; and three under- 
graduates — John B. Cole '70, 
Steven J. Rustari 70 and Peter 
C. Wilson 70. 

From 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. Satur- 
day the combined meeting of the 
Alumni Fund and Alumni Council 
will be held in the Faculty Room 
of Massachusetts Hall. Walter H. 
Moulton '58, Director of Student 
Aid, and Robert E. Ives '69, As- 
sistant to the Director of Admis- 
sions, will be the guest speakers. 

At 11 a.m. dedication cere- 
monies will be held at the Mal- 
colm E. Morrell Gymnasium. The 
Alumni Council made the original 
request to name Bowdoin's new 
gymnasium after the late Mr. 
Morrell, Director of Athletics 
from 1928 to 1967. 



PE APPROVED DANCE CLASSES 

Also a teacher of Yoga and a graduate of the Royal 
Academy of Dancing, London, England. Ruth Gibson 
has developed a modern ballet class designed to tone 
and limber the body, improve coordination and the 
ability to relax tensions. 

Classes Tentatively Scheduled Mon. and/or Wed. — 7 p.m. 
Beginning in October 

APPLY TO: 

Ruth Gibson School of Classical Ballet 

98 Maine Street 
725-5907 



OWEN'S TAXI 

CALL 

725-5000 or 725-5400 

9 Pleasant St., Brunswick 




"With trembling 

pseudopods, Mark 

Rudd tore the 

earth girl's 

spacesuit." 



For a free copy of 
NATIONAL RE- 
VIEW, write: Dept. 
U, ISO E. 35 Street. 
N. Y. 10016 




In Progress at Macbeans . . .an 

EXTRAORDINARY 
RECORD SALE 



Great Performances of Bach, Vivaldi, Mozart, Cage, Debussy, 
Neilsen, Handel, Telemann, Brahms, Tchaikowsky, Folk, Jazz, 
Pops ... by Callas, Rampal, Landowska, Casals, Caruso, Arm- 
strong, Bechet, Guthrie, McKuen, Seeger ... on Audio Fidelity, 
Decca, DGG, Everest, Concert-Disc, Philips, MGM, Mercury, Lon- 
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BRUNSWICK 



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Books — Records — Music Systems — Cards - Prints — Radio TV 



String Concerts Set 



The Curtis Zimbalist Concert 
Series will include six musical 
programs during the 1969-70 aca- 
demic year, Professor Robert K. 
Beckwith, Chairman of the De- 
partment of Music, announced to- 
day- 

In addition to the Curtis-Zim- 
balist Concerts, the College will 
sponsor Jhe annual Faculty Reci- 
tal and five Bowdoin Music Club 
concerts as part of a program of 
musical offerings for residents of 
the Brunswick, Portland and 
Lewiston communities and sur- 
rounding areas. 



Season tickets will enable sub 
scribers to attend all six concerts 
in the Curtis-Zimbalist Series and 
are available at $10 now through 
Nov. 1. Individual tickets to the 
concerts will be $2.50, and chil 
dren's tickets will be $.50. Sea- 
son tickets may be purchased by 
writing to Concert Series, Bow- 
doin College, Brunswick, Mainn 
04011. 

The Bowdoin Music Club con- 
certs and all other Bowdoin con- 
certs will be open to, the public 
without charge. 



McQuater On Committee 



By JEFF DRUMMOND 

The first order of business for 
the Student Council last Monday 
night was the election of a repre- 
sentative at large for the Com- 
mittee on the Afro-American 
Center. The position was open to 
all Bowdoin students. Out of eight 
nominees, Lindsay McQuater, 
1971, won a clear majority. 

The Committee at present con- 
sists of Ron Hines, Rich Fudge, 
George Butcher, Duane Taylor, 
Richard Adams and eight faculty 
members. 

The Council passed a motion to 
look into the possibility of spon- 
soring mixers in the Old Gym. 
Costing approximately $400, the 
money could come from the $1 ad- 
mission fee and the money col- 
lected from parking fines. The 
Council then appointed Len Jolles 
and Glenn Kaplan to investigate 
the reactions of girls' schools, the 
prices involved, and the available 
facilities. 

John Cole .remarked that the 
faculty meeting on the tenth 
would be sure to consider the case 
of a fraternity which used "un- 
acceptable" hazing in its orienta- 
tion prograr.i. He stated that he 
believed the Council should take 
action, because the faculty was 



sure to be more punitive than the 
Council. He is planning to appoint 
a committee to discuss this situ- 
ation. 

Len Jolles, Chris Pierce, and 
Rick Saunders were chosen to 
head the preparations for Cam- 
pus Chest weekend; Steve Mcln- 
tire was elected to the continuing 
Pierce Committee; the Council 
voted unanimously to approve the 
recommendation that the rule 
prohibiting scholarship students 
or freshmen from using cars be 
abolished; a motion was passed 
unanimously to request that the 
faculty-student committee on 
athletics consider the require- 
ment for four semester credits of 
physical education in order to re- 
ceive a degree; John Philipsborn 
will look into the possibility of 
including the swimming test in 
this physical education discus- 
sion; and John Cole announced 
the receipt of several form letters 
approving the student body's 
stand on the Moratorium from 
Congressmen and Senators. In- 
cluded were Senators Bayh, Hat- 
field, Hughes, McCarthy, and Nel- 
son, and Congressmen Lowen- 
stein and Morris Udall. Absent 
were any members of the Maine 
delegation. 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Member of the United States Student Press Association 

THE BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
A. P. Dmnett. j. p. Gramrer. Alan Kolod. Bob Armstrong 
Published weekly when classes are held during the Fall and Spring Semester by the 
students or Bowdoin College. Address editorial communications to the Editor and 
business and subscription communications to the Business Manager at the ORIENT. 
Moulton Union Bowdoin College. Brunswick. Me. 04011. Represented for nationsi 
advertising by the National Educational Advertising Service. Inc. Second class postage 
paid at Brunswick. Me. 04011. The subscription rate Is five (6) dollars for one year. 




s*>^ 



Fresh Coffee and 

Spudnuts 

Makes . 

"ANYTIME SPITDNUT 

TIME" 

212 Maine Street 
Brunswick, Maine 



HOLIDAY PIZZA 

CORNER OF UNION & CEDAR STS., BRUNSWICK 

(Next to the Giant Store) 
PHONE 725-2521 



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Friday and Saturday — 1 2 Noon to Midnight 

Sunday to Thursday — 4 P.M. to Midnight 

DELICIOUS PIZZA • HOT OVEN GRINDERS 

• ITALIAN SANDWICHES 

DINE IN OR TAKE OUT 

Our Dough I. Made Fresh Daily! 



FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1969 



THE BOWDOJN ORIENT 



PAGE THREE 



$pq 



Crisis Series Offered 



(Continued from page 1) 
gram is a failure because it per 
petuates a two class system of 
medical care. 

Dr. Cronkhite presented us with 
a very simple dilemma. All pos- 
sible solutions based on the pres- 
ent system have been tried and 
they have failed. Doctors running 
a practice in a ghetto area can- 
not survive and they don't want 
to try. Hospitals in ghettos can- 
not afford to subsidize inner city 
medical practice sufficiently to 
make it desirable for private phy- 
sicians. Dr. Cronkhite proposes a 
new federal agency. This agency 
would use federal funds and uni- 
versity brains on a massive scale 
to attack the problem. He calls it 
a "medical equivalent of NASA." 
Dr. Cronkhite foresees the possi- 
bility of Federal Health Insur- 
ance and more governmental 
regulation of the medical profes- 
sion. However, he said it would 
take at least 15 years for such a 
program to take effect. 

Dr. Cronkhite is not well re- 
ceived throughout the medical 
profession due to his radical ideas. 
He was, however, warmly wel- 
comed by the audience here and 
as two students put it, "He was 
the best lecturer we've had so 
far." 

Wednesday, October 29, two 
films were shown. The first film 
concerned itself with tenement 
living in Chicago. It was con- 
ducted on an interview basis, and 
it depicted one day in the life of a 
group of tenement dwellers. The 
main points of the film were the 
hopelessness of slum living, the 
constant moving from place to 
place and the detrimental effects 
of the slum on the children. The 
film accentuated the general de- 
spair of the residents of this Chi- 
cago neighborhood. 

The second film was entitled 
"Uptown; Portrait o'f the South 
Bronx." There were few inter- 
views conducted. The points of the 
film were rather vague. The film 
bombarded the audience with 
many different observations which 
were sometimes unrelated. The 
narrator emphasized the invisible 
wall around the South Bronx that 
permitted no escape. He conveyed 
an atmosphere of discontent but 



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was not very specific about it for 
the most part. He mentioned the 
constant transiency of the popu- 
lation in the ghetto the reliance 
upon welfare and the unscrupu- 
lous merchants that accompany 
the welfare checks. The film did 
not go much beyond that. It can 
easily be said that the second film 
was not as comprehensive as the 
first.. 

The Urban Crisis lecture and 
film series is open to the public. 
Dr. Darling, the economics repre- 
sentative in the course comment- 
ed on this. He indicated that "the 
lectures are of great interest to 
local public officials, such as the 
Town Manager of Brunswick and 
town selectmen," Portland city of- 
ficials' also attend the lectures. 
There is a Bath-Brunswick Re- 
gional Planning Commission that 
sends representatives to the lec- 
tures. Dr. Darling also said that, 
"the lectures are for the benefit 
of the retired people in the com- 
munity who settled in a college 
town expecting such affairs. We 
serve them in this respect." 



Delahanty Named 
President of 

Bowdoin Fathers 

Superior Court Justice Thomas 
E. Delahanty of (15 Delcliff 
Lane) Lewiston, Me., has been 
elected President of the Bowdoin 
College Fathers Association. 

Other new officers chosen at 
the association's annual meeting 
Saturday include First Vice 
President, Stewart F. Oakes, of 
Holden, Mass. ; Second Vice Presi- 
dent. Atty. Nathaniel Fenster- 
stock of New York, N.Y.; Secre- 
tary, Edward E. Langbein of New 
York, N.Y.; and Treasurer Her- 
bert E. M'ehlhorn of Brunswick, 
Me. 

Judge Delahanty announced 
that Donovan D. Lancaster of 
Brunswick has been elected to 
life membership in the association 
by the organization's directors. 
Mr. Lancaster, who retired last 
June as Director of Bowdoin's 
Moulton Union, served for many 
years as chairman of the College's 
Fathers Association Committee. 



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Afro-Am . . . 

(Continued from page I) 

ent lack of communication,, There 
has been some misunderstanding 
between the Afro-American So- 
ciety and the administration re- 
garding the make-up of the Afro- 
American Center Committee. This 
committee will coordinate the de- 
velopment, policies, and opera- 
tions of the Center, and much pre- 
viously unavailable information 
will be accessible upon its forma- 
tion. This ad hoc committee will 
consist of six Afro-American So- 
ciety members, two of whom will 
reside in the Center, five faculty 
members, and one Student Coun- 
cil representative. 

Mr. Streetman seemed optimis- 
tic as to the future progress of 
the African-American Center. 
The Mitchell House renovation is 
nearing completion and an accept- 
able committee has finally been 
formed. A statement from the ad- 
ministration regarding the Afro- 
American Center will be forth- 
coming within the week. Mr. 
Streetman also stressed that the 
Center will be open to the entire 
student body and expressed his 
hope that Bowdoin students will 
take full advantage of all that the 
Bowdoin African-American Cen- 
ter will have to offer. 



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PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Parents See Draw; 
Maine Beaten Again 

By BRIAN DAVIS 
Orient Sports Writer 

The Parents Weekend varsity soccer action re- 
sulted in a Bowdoin-Colby standoff. The Bears were 
first to score in Saturday's contest. Lee Rowe, cen- 
ter forward, tallied on a pass from right wing Alex 
Turner, midway through the first period. Colby's 
Mules sought revenge and scored early in the second 
period. Although each team had sixteen attempts, 
the score remained one to one after two overtime 
periods. 

Special recognition should be given to Bear 
goalie, Russ Outhuse, who is credited with thirteen 
saves for the game. The tie is Bowdoin's only unde- 
cided match of the year. The Bears meet Colby 
again on November 5 in an effort to break the stale- 
mate. 

Orono and, in particular, the University of Maine 
were the squad's target last Wednesday. In this 
match, the opposition scored first on a shot by their 
center forward in the opening period. The remain- 
der of the first half showed several unsuccessful 
scoring threats by both teams' front five. Bowdoin's 
first goal came in the ^hird period on a shot by Lee 
Rowe. 

A series of penalty kicks was responsible for the 
next two changes in score. Late in the third period, 
Maine went ahead on a penalty kick, two to one. 
Then in the fourth period the Bears were given a 
penalty kick which Lee Rowe made good. The game 
remained a two to two draw until the second over- 
time period when Bear center forward Lee Rowe 
took the ball in unassisted, scoring both his and 
Bowdoin's third goal of the afternoon. In fact, 
Rowe is responsible for all Bear points tallied in the 
past two games. 

The victory over the University of Maine puts 
the Bear's Maine State Series record at two, one 
and one. The final two 'games of the season are 
against Maine teams, Bates and Colby. 

Frosh Booters 
Record at 6-0 
Girma Leads 

By BILL BI'SIIK Y 
For the Orient 

Undefeated in six games, the 

freshman soccer team braces it- 
self for the likewise unbeaten 

University of New Hampshire 

team this afternoon. 
Bowdoin will be working with a 

high powered offense that has 

produced 32 goals in six games. 

Most of the scoring has come 

from Girma Ashmeron, Bowdoin's 

freshman Ethiopian Olympic 

player, and Joe Rosa. Both in 

double figures, Girma has netted 

15 and Joe 10. Other goals this 

season have come from Bill Sex- 
ton and Don Hoenig, with two 

apiece, and Alan Bascom, Paul 

Noone. and Mitch Glazier, with 

one each. 

The offense hasn't done it all 
.alone this season. The defense of 
halfbacks Paul Noone, Mitch 
Glazier, and Ted Westlake and 
fullbacks Dick Cartland, Dave 
White, and John Rozier has held 
its opponents to only three goals. 
Goalie Roger Selbert made 29 
saves before being injured in the 
fourth game of the season. Since 
his injury, he has been backed up 
by Walter Spiegel and Pete Bev- 
ins. 




FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1969 



Runners Outpaced 
Twice At Colby 

By ED STEWART 
Orient Sports Writer 

The varsity harriers outpaced a lone Maine team 
last Tuesday in a third place effort among the four 
competing teams in the MIAA meet at Colby The 
Polar Bears tallied 79 points to Bates' first place 
20 score, Colby's 51 points, and Maine's 80. 

Running at Waterville, Mark Cuneo finished fifth. 
Rounding out the Bowdoin scorers were Ken Cuneo 
(15th), Bill Seekins (17th), Steve Moriarty (18th) 
and Bob Bassett (24th). John Emerson, a Bates 
freshman, won the race with a 25:11.2 time for the 
five mile course. 

Saturday, October 25, saw Mark Cuneo gain his 
fourth first place finish of the year in four meets 
However, Cuneo's effort, once again, was not 
enough by itself to squeeze the Bears past Colby. 
The final score came out 23-33 in the Mule's favor, 
bringing the Bowdoin record to 1-3. Finishing fourth 
was Ken Cuneo, eighth was Seekins, ninth Moriarty, 
and tenth Bassett. 



NOWHERE, MAN ... is the direction of Colby back Brian Cone 
(white) as Bear defense breaks through their backfleld. 



Sailors Finish 5th in New England 

1 In sailing last week, the Polar Bears wound up 
their season with the best record they have had in 
more than six years, finishing fifth in the New Eng- 
land conference finals of twenty-five colleges. 



Back on the road 

Bears Kick Mules; Host Bates 

By CHRIS PIERCE 
Orient Sports Writer 

Bowdoin to a 38-14 rout of Colby before 4 000 Parent's Day fans last Saturday. The Polar Bears amassed 305 
yards on offense in the first half as they exploded for 28 second period points and a 38-0 bulge at halftime 

I he Polar Bears drew first blood when Captain Jo hn Delahanty booted a 2o yard field goal, his 1 3th of his 

career, setting a New England 
Small College record. With 3:28 
left in the first stanza, Benson hit 
Wiley with a 27 yard pass over 
the middle to make the score 10- 
0. The Polar Bears then moved 
63 yards early in the second peri- 
od in 11 plays, with Bill Loeffler, 
who replaced John Demenkoff, 
scoring from a yard out. Bow- 
doin's next six pointer came with 
a 50 yard completion on another 
touchdown runs minutes later to 
pass from Benson to Wi'ey. Ben- 
son and Loeffler added short 
increase the tally to 38-0. 

Coach Jim Lentz turned the 
game over to the reserves in the 
second half while Colby remained 
with their first team to score two 
touchdowns by freshmen Brian 
Cone and Dave Lane. Although 
John Demenkoff's loss is a costly 
one for the Polar Bears, sopho- 
more Bill Loeffler was certainly 
an adequate replacement, run- 
ning for 107 yards in 21 carries 
and a pair of scores. 

Bowdoin will try for the sec- 
ond consecutive CBB ( Colby - 
Bates-Bowdoin) Championship ti- 
tle Saturday when the Polar 
Bears entertain a 3-3 Bates squad 
Bates had been spotty, but their 
quarterback, Steve Boybro has 
completed 57% of his passes. 




- fcy !>■▼• CaraM 



lmprisontd by the way it could have been 

left here on my own, or so it items. 
I' re got to leave be/ore i start to scream: 
But someone's locked the door— and took 
the key. 

Feelin' alright? 

i'm not feelin' too good myself. 
Tragic 




In-flight interview 



Pitcher Jim Moloney Talks 



(ED. NOTE: Bill Fink a freshman, was traveling 
from Ohio back to Bowdoin last weekend and had 
an opportunity to talk with Jim Maloney, pitcher 
for the Cincinnati Redlegs baseball club. With the 
professional season now over, he writes some after- 
thoughts given by Maloney in their discussion.) 

By BILL FINK 

for the Orient 

Through nothing more than sheer coincidence, it 
was my pleasure to meet and talk with Jim Ma- 
loney, ace of the Cincinnati Reds pitching staff this 
past weekend, as we both traveled between Dayton, 
Ohio, and Boston. From a unique player-fan point 
of contact, Maloney and I had quite an interesting 
discussion concerning, among other things, the 
Reds, the National League, the future of his pitch- 
ing career, and the future of baseball itself. Here, 
in part, are the highlights of that discussion. 

The first question which I asked of the 31-year- 
old veteran right-hander was who he considered the 
toughest hitter he had faced in his pitching career. 



Without a moment's hesitation, Maloney replied 
"'Henry Aaron of the Braves." Jim went on to ex- 
plain that Aaron's tremendous power and his out- 
standing talent as a "bad ball" hitter account for 
this high standing. 

the strongest team in baseball today, Jim men- 
tioned his own Cincinnati club. "On paper, there 
isn't a team that can beat us,' 'he said. The Califor- 
nia fastballer cited the Red's .277 team batting 
average, tops in the NL, the fact that five of the 
eight regular starters hit better than .300 in 1969 
(Pete Rose — .344, tops in the league; Alex John- 
son — .3.24; Bobby Tolan — .316; Lee Mya — .307- 
and Tony Perez — .301), and the Reds high defen- 
sive percentage (.987 — tops in the league) as the 
team's definite strengths. "All we need is one more 
good starting pitcher, and we should take our 
(western) division by at least ten games next year," 
Maloney told me. 

(First of two parts 
continued next week) 



THE 



M 







BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 



VOLUME XCIX 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1969 



NUMBER 6 



Automobile Prohibition Is Panther Officer Visits Bowdoin; 
Likely To Be Lifted Soon N More Walking On The Fence 



By JOHN MEDEEROS 

The prospects are "extremely 
good" that the rule prohibiting 
students receiving financial aid 
from maintaining cars on cam- 
pus will be abolished, say Dean 
of Students Paul L. Nyhus and 
Director of Financial Aid Walter 
H. Moulton. 

In separate interviews with the 
Orient, both Moulton and Nyhus 
came out in favor of such a 
change as a matter of "practicali- 
ty" and "consistency." 

Moulton pointed out that an in- 
dividual's fliuwrtai need is com- 
puted on the basis of a standard 
formula set up by the College 
Scholarship Service. This formu- 
la presumes that a student and 
his family will make certain con- 
tributions to his education. How- 
ever, Moulton said, if a student 
wishes to take on extra work, 
either in the summer or while in 
school, he is free to spend the 
money he earns in any way he de- 
sires. 

Thus, students on fina nc ia l aid 
who take on extra work are now 
permitted to "buy a new stereo or 
take a trip to Europe," but not to 
TTMftitwhi a car, said Moulton, and 



it would be "far more consistent" 
for the college to allow them to 
have cars if they wish. 

Dean Nyhus pointed out that 
ownership of a car is also "a mat- 
ter of social equality." Since so- 
cial life and a car are intertwined, 
denying a scholarship student ac- 
cess to a car can disrupt his so- 
cial life. 

Commenting on the progress of 
the movement, Nyhus noted that 
the Student Life Committee and 
the Student Council have already 
passed motions indicating their 
support for abolition of the rule. 
A subcommittee of the Commit- 
- tee on Admissions and Financial 
Aid approved the idea, but sug- 
gested that the college issue a 
strong statement to the effect 
that it will not be subsidizing the 
cars of scholarship students. 

Such a statement is now being 
drafted, said the Dean, and will 
be presented in the near future to 
the full Committee on Admissions 
and Financial Aid. 

When a resolution approving 
the change has been passed by 
that, committee, an administra- 
tive decision promulgating the 
rule will be made by the college. 



By /AY SWEET 

Eugene Jones speaks quietly. 
When he emphasizes a word or 
phrase, he repeats it. 'We got 
nothing, nothing to live or die for 
but liberation, liberation." De- 
spite the fact that Eugene Jones 
is a quiet man, one generally gets 
the point the first time, 
i Jones is lieutenant of informa- 
tion for the Boston chapter of the 
revolutionary Black Panther 
Party. Wednesday afternoon he 



of the 



Keylor Committee Finds 
Lack Of Communications 




By FBEDCUSICK 

"Communication" is one of 
those words, like "relevance" or 
"credibility," that have become 
increasingly popular in recent 
days. It is fashionable to speak of 
a communications gap" Parents 
worry about "communicating'' 
with their children. Husbands and 
wives agonize over their failure 
to "communicate." Wars, riots, 
and political defeats are invari- 
ably attributed to a "lack of com- 
munication." 

The Alumni Council of Bow- 
doin, a body usually noted for its 
fund raising, is also worried about 
communicating. Recently it set up 
a Committee on Communications 
under the leadership of Mr. Ar- 
thur Keylor. The committee's 
purpose is to discuss "priorities, 
plans, and pr ogre ss " with "mem- 
bers of the College community," 
in this case students. 

The Keylor Committee met 
Oct. 30 in the Moulton Union with 
a group of student "leaden." Su- 
perfically at least, the "leaders" 
were a diverse group They in- 
cluded: one holder of the Wooden 
Spoon (dark suit, serious expres- 
sion), one football captain (sports 
Jacket, faint sideburns), one over- 
weight Orient editor (ratty 
sweater, three day old beard), 
one WBOR announcer (sharkskin 
suit, supercool expression), one 
independent (three piece suit, an 
occasional smile), one member of 
Coleman farm (shirt, and even a 
tie, Victorian aidewhiskers). and 
one president of Afro-Am (bright 
red shirt, weeded charm sus- 
pended around his neck). The 
members of the committee dif- 
fered only in the degree of their 
k« | a*— « (the older members) and 
the depth of their crew cuts (the 
younger members). 

chairman (Mr. Key- 



lor was absent) began the meet- 
ing by asking the students If they 
had anything to say or any com- 
plaints to make. The students had 
nothing to say and no complaints 
to make. The meeting would have 
ended there but a quick thinking 
committee member asked a ques- 

(Pleaee tarn to page t) 



spoke of a reality completely alien 
to all but a handful of Bowdoin 
students. 

The Panther party is conscious 
of itself as a revolutionary van- 
guard. Its heroes are already 
martyrs: Bobby Hutton, 17, was 
shot to death by police in Oak- 
land, California. Huey Newton, a 
party organizer and national 
leader, is in a California jail as a 



result of the same incident Eld- 
ridge Cleaver, former national 
minister of Information, is in 
exile. Bobby Seale has been sen- 
tenced to four years in jail for 
contempt of court and still faces 
charges in the Chicago conspiracy 
trial; he Is also charged with 
murder in Connecticut. Although 
the revolution may have yet to 
begin, the counter-revolution has 
been with us for some time. 

This was Jones' first point 'We 
relate to it as fascism, as open 
terror." However, his party sees 
overt violent revolution now as 
"insanity." Today the party's role 
is educating and organizing the 
people. They have three specific 
programs in effect, a free break- 
fast program, a free medical unit, 
and a "liberation school." Each 
of these, Jones explained, "ex- 
poses . the contradictions" in 
American society. The people see, 
for instance, the contradiction be- 
tween a multi-billion dollar space 
program and the necessity of a 
Panther-run breakfast program. 
Liberation schools deal with the 
capitalistic oppressors: "the ava- 
ricious businessmen, lying politi- 
cians, and pig cops." The party, 
in Jones' words, "puts programs 
into practice to serve the basic 
material needs of the people." 

Beyond this basic function, 
Jones explained the broader edu- 
cational role of the Party. He sees 
capitalism collapsing. As the sys- 
tem feels ever greater threats, it 
responds with ever greater re- 
pression. Jones cited the continu- 
ing harrassment of his party, the 
Kennedy assassinations, and the 
progression from Kennedy to 
Johnson to Nixon. However, he 
sees the election of Nixon as a 
step closer to revolution. When 



unemployment goes up to eight or 
nine per cent it involves large 
segments of the middle class, and 
frustration and, eventually, revo- 
lution will spread, he claims. The 
Vietnam war has aided the revo- 
lution in more ways than one. 
First, dissaffection from this sys- 
tem has spread; second, when It 
ends, the economy will suffer; and 
third, it has taught a revolution- 
ary lesson. "The power of the peo- 
ple, the spirit of the people Is 
more powerful than man's tech- 
nology. We just had the Vietnam 
war . . . we saw where that was 
at" 

Jones refused to predict when 
the revolution would come. He 
also did not specify the forms he 
saw replacing capitalism, 
although his analysis was clearly 
Marxist. There was, however, no 
mistaking his authenticity and 
sincerity regarding the Panther's 
vision of the struggle. In Jones' 
words, "You're either part of the 
solution of you're part of the 
problem. There ain't no more 
walking on the fence." Right on, 
Eugene. Right on. 



Gym Dedicated 
To Mai Morrell 



Bowdoin has dedicated its new 
gymnasium to the memory of 
Malcolm E. Morrell, who retired 
as Director of Athletics in 1967 
after a distinguished 42-year ca- 
reer. 



Council Caught With Pants Down? 

Accusations Are Leveled Against Zete House 



By NOEM CAREY 

"Orientation is the modern equivalent of hazing. 

It has no place among undergraduates in college 

today." 

This statement taken from the Pierce Commit- 
tee Report on "Underclass Campus Environment" 
summarizes the feeling of many administrators and 
faculty members at Bowdoin College, and possibly 
an increasing number of students as well The 
Committee's (and the administration's) dislike of 
fraternity orientation practices is attributed hi a 

report to " the present demands of a fraternity 

on a freshman's time, and the distractions created 
by the present fraternity orientation (which) tend 
to affect adversely his intellectual interests at the 
most impressionable time in his college career." A 
loss of "intellectual zeal," however, is not all that 
the administration is concerned about In an inter- 
view with Paul L. Nyhus, the Dean of Students at 
Bowdoin, the Dean pointed out that the college ad- 
ministration was responsible for undergraduates 
in the fraternities. If any freshman were injured as 
a result of some orientation practice his parents 
could hold the college administration accountable. 
Therefore, the college has added reason to stress 
that the fraternity is "not totally independent" re- 
garding college policy. Dean Nyhus offered as a 
possible solution that the parents of men joining 
fraternities sign a paper releasing the college from 
responsibility should an injury result from any ori- 
entation program. 



"We therefore reiterate our recommendation 
that it (orientation) be abolished." 

In the light of the disfavor with winch orienta- 
tion is looked upon, this recommendation by the 
Pierce Committee indicates a rather dim future for 
the orientation program at Bowdoin, or at least as 
it has been practiced in the not so distant past 

An illustration of orientation's growing unpopu- 
larity with the administration is that of the case of 
Zeta Psi. The Zete freshmen were asked as part of 
their orientation requirements to break up into two 
teams and leave for Brown and Dartmouth one 
weekend for a scavenger hunt The items to be 
collected did not have to be acquired illegally, nor 
were the freshmen forced to leave. Unknowingly, 
however, Zeta Psi had broken an orientation rule 
which stated that an orientation program must not 
cause a freshman to leave the campus. Anthony 
Ferreira. the president of the Zete house, was called 
to the Dean of Student's office where he was told 
that ". . . they were ready to hang me." He was 
brought before the Judiciary Board of the college, 
which decided that he was not personally to blame 
for violating the rule. One of the Zete freshmen, 
when asked about the scavenger hunt replied that 
the administration was "making an issue when one 
really doesn't exist" He stated that on the whole 
the freshmen had no complaints about their orien- 
tation, and in fact regarded the scavenger hunt as 
the most enjoyable part of their program. There 
no punishments for failure to participate in 
(Flense turn to page 5) 



The informal Saturday 
mony, one of the highlights of the 
annual fall meeting of the Alum- 
ni Council and Alumni Fund, was 
attended by hundreds of Bowdoin 
men and their families, including 
many members of Mr. MorreU's 
Class of 1934. 

Mrs. Morrell and Dr. Roger 
Howell, Jr. unveiled the gymnasi- 
um's name, which has been carved 
into an outside wall to the right 
of the main entrance. 

Noting that the Morrell Gym- 
nasium "is one of the outstanding 
small college indoor facilities," 
President Howell recalled that 
the College's Governing Boards 
responded enthusiastically to an 
Alumni Council resolution urging 
that the gym be named in Mr. 
Morrell's honor. 

President Howell declared that 
under the direction of Mr. Mor- 
rell, who died last yea/, Bowdoin 
developed "an athletics for all 
policy with major instruction in 
carryover sports, a year-round 
intramural program, and compe- 
tition In intercollegiate athletics 
in a wide variety of varsity sports. 
"Because he was concerned to 
see that the. benefits offered by 
the athletic program were given 
to the whole college community, 
because he had the wisdom to see 
that restricting athletic opportu- 
nities to the most talented min- 
ority would be a harmful thing, 
because he saw the significance 
of instruction in athletic activi- 
ties winch can be enjoyed after 
college days, Mai Morrell deeply 
(Please torn to page S) 





PAGE TWO 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1969 



Tiger Kitten Lost 
On Longfellow St. 
Contact Jay Sweet 



Morrell Gym Dedicated Communications Study 

• * //<....<!.. ...1.1 /.-,..,. nam 1\ on fratomitips hv caui nn 



Stowe Travel 

Thanksgiving Bus 

Non-Stop to Boston 

November 26 

Lmtm Moulton Union at 1 p.m. 

9 PLEASANT STREET 
BRUNSWICK 

(Call Stow* For RoMrroriou) 
(No Sisnlac Up — No Obli«.Ucm> 



(Continued from page 1) 
influenced the lives of thousands 
of Bowdoin graduates. 

"It is only fitting," President 
Howell added, "that this building, 
for which he worked so hard and 
which in its facilities brings to life 
his philosophy of physical educa- 
tion, should be named in his hon- 
or." 

William D. Ireland of Bruns- 
wick, Vice President of Bowdoin's 
Board of Trustees and Chairman 
of the Governing Boards Commit- 
tee on Physical Education, said 
the new gym is a monument to 
Mr. Morrell and incorporates "his 



dreams, his ideas and his experi- 
ence." 

"When Mai was elected Direc- 
tor of Athletics in 1928," Mr. Ire- 
land said, "Bowdoin had only 
three coaches and no trainer. We 
now have nine coaches full time 
and^UJtT part time, and a trainer. 



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IoJR)28 we had a program of five 
rajor sports. Today we have 16 
varsity and 16 freshman sports 
with teams playing in all of 
them." 

Mr. Ireland said that despite 
Mr. Morrell's devotion to physical 
training and athletics "he always 
recognized the primary impor- 
tance of the academic side of the 
College and adherence to all the 
rules of the game." 

"His dedication and devotion to 
his College was complete," Mr. 
Ireland said, "and today, as we 
name this building for him, his 
memory will be perpetuated along 
with two illustrious predecessors 
— Dudley Allen Sargent of the 
Class of 1875, for whom the old 
gymnasium was named; and Dr. 
Frank Nathaniel Whittier of the 
Class of 1885, for whom Whittier 
Field was named." 

Daniel K. Stuckey, Bowdoin's 
current Director of Athletics, as- 
serted that "Mai's experience and 
wisdom have given us a good pro- 
gram and a wonderful plant. The 
building we are naming today, 
when combined with the Sargent 
Gymnasium, enables us to offer a 
complete physical education pro- 




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(Continued from page 1) 

tion about fraternities. The frat- 
ernity question was debated, on 
and off, for more than half the 
meeting. No matter what subject 
was being discussed the fraternity 
issue would always pop up in it. 
Was Bowdoin thinking of going 
coed? Co-education might hurt 
the fraternities. Was the College 
thinking of admitting more stu- 
dents? That would increase the 
number of independents and en- 
danger the intimate smallness of 
Bowdoin. And what's the new 
Afro- American center? Wasn't 
that likely to become a black 
fraternity? The Wooden Spoon 
holder summed up student feeling 



gram for all of the undergradu- 
ates." 

"On an occasion like this," Mr. 
Stuckey added, "it might happen 
that we talk too much about the 
building and not enough about 
the man. I probably knew Mai a 
shorter time than anyone here, 
but I have come to know him and 
appreciate him more and more 
every day. His ability to size up 
people and influence them to do 
their best for Bowdoin has given 
the College a wonderful group of 
coaches and an office staff second 
to none. 

"His spirit and influence are 
still around us. All of us are 
pleased and proud that Mai's col- 
lege has decided to put his name 
on this fine building, and we 
pledge ourselves to carry on his 
work as he would want us to." 

Also on hand for the exercises 
were Mr. Morrell's two sons, 
Atty. Malcolm E. Morrell, Jr., of 
Bangor, Me., a member of Bow- 
doin's Class of 1949, and John B. 
Morrell ft Marblehead, Mass., a 
member of Bowdoin's Class of 
1952; and his brother, Allen E. 
Morrell of Brunswick, a member 
of the Class of 1922. 



on fraternities by saying that 
fraternities might, and probably 
would, go, but that as long as 
Bowdoin remained at its present 
size the students would have no 
trouble getting to know each 
other even without fraternities. 

The issue of co-education was 
thoroughly discussed. Most of the 
committee members seemed to 
prefer no girls on campus, or at 
best the. establishment of a co- 
ordinate college. They didn't want 
to lose that special Bowdoin 
"something" by letting girls in. 
Surprisingly the students seemed 
to agree. The Wooden Spoon hold- 
er even said that there should be 
no increase in the size of the col- 
lege at all, whether girls or boys, 
because that would destroy the 
intimate, "family," atmosphere of 
the College. The Afro-Am presi- 
dent was opposed to co-education 
for personal reasons, "I'm from 
Roxbury. I came here to get away 
from women." Only two students 
were against Bowdoin's remain- 
ing an all male school. 

Following the discussion of co- 
education the committee kicked 
around, so to speak, SDS and 
Afro-Am. SDS was dismissed as 
being trivial and ineffective. 
Questions were raised however, 
about the new Afro-Am center. 
The Afro-Am president insisted 
that the new center would not be 
a black fraternity or dorm. He 
was asked if his society admitted 
white members. "No." was his 
reply. 

Several times during the meet- 
ing members of the committee 
expressed surprise over the mild- 
ness and uncomplaining attitude 
of the student "leaders." At the 
end of the meeting a resolution 
was passed calling for the next 
session to be made open to the 
student body as a whole. 






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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 




PAGE THREE 



Dr. Taussig Calls For 
More Balanced View 



By ALLEN H. SENEAR 

Dr. Helen B. Taussig, "Ameri- 
ca's most eminent woman doctor," 
told the two hundred students, 
faculty, and townspeople that we 
must "go slow" with heart trans- 
plants until more reliable meth- 
ods are developed. 

Dr. Taussig, speaking last Wed- 
nesday night, pointed out that be- 
cause our knowledge of immu- 
nology is far behind our surgical 
techniques, an infection often de- 
velops as a result of the "immu- 
no-suppresants that are used to 
inhibit the body's natural rejec- 
tion processes." Within the first 
four months about 70% of all 
transplant patients die, largely 
from this kind of injection. A 
heart transplant presently costs 
$30,000 and of course consumes 
hospital space and personnel. Dr. 
Taussig also said that if it was a 
metabolic condition that caused 
the old heart to fail that same 
condition would ultimately affect 
the new one. She felt that efforts 
would be better spent toward the 
understanding of these metabolic 
conditions. Furthermore, most of 
the transplants are from young 
donors to older recipients'. Dr. 
Taussig stated that it would be 
better to work toward keeping the 
young alive. 

Dr. Taussig noted there wasn't 
much discussion of morality in 
regards to cornea or kidney trans- 
plants. It was not until the heart 
transplant (which, according to 
Dr. Taussig, is not the most dif- 
ficult operation we perform on the 
heart) that such discussion be- 
came popular. She also observed 
that while it is a common topic 
among students it is not likely to 
affect them as is the use of drugs. 
Different people react differently 
to LSD, and our mental institu- 
tions have become crowded with 
victims of that drug, she said. 
New drugs require exhaustive 
study before they can prudently 
be released for use. Dr. Taussig 
stressed what happened with sev- 
eral years ago with Thalidomine 
— when 10,000 German babies 
were deformed — could happen 
again, maybe here, with LSD or 
any other drug that has not been 
sufficiently studied. Even birth 
control pills are not given the 
respect they deserve; she re- 
minded the audience that they are 
a very powerful and, in some 
cases, dangerous drug, yand that 
they should be used with caution 
and under a doctor's supervision. 

Although it was not directly re- 
lated to medical advances and mo- 
ral problems. Dr. Taussig had 
some very interesting comments 
on lightning accidents, a subject 
she had studied extensively. Many 



persons are knocked unconscious 
by lightning and stop breathing. 
Dr. Taussig stressed that artifi- 
cial respiration can usually revive 
the person and should be applied 
immediately. Most lightning 
deaths could have been prevented 
she said, if only the other persons 
present had been aware of this. 

Dr. Taussig is Professor Emeri- 
tus of Pediatrics at Johns Hop- 
kins and* an authority on "blue 
babies." Sitting in the front row 
one cannot help but be impressed 
by this woman who has dedicated 
her life to protecting of human 
life. The issues most people ex- 
pected to hear discussed, such as : 
Who should get transplants; 
Should individuals have the right 
to have their bodies disposed of as 
they see fit ; and how much money 
and effort should be expended on 
supporting the life processes of a 
single individual when others are 
also dying were not discussed in 
ethical terms. But there is really 
not much that can be objectively 
stated on these topics that is not 
already obvious. Dr. Taussig 
stated that such things were con- 
nected with religious and cultural 
beliefs, and instead of rehashing 
these much discussed problems 
she indirectly presented a philos- 
ophy for future research and de- 
velopment in the area of medical 
science. 



Fair Sex Fares Well In Forest; 
Coeds CaugHt In Housing Hassle 



By JEFF DRUMMOND 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE: Bruns- 
wick, Maine, 04011. Boy/girl ra- 
tio 118.75 to one. 

Sound incredible? It is, and so 
is Bowdoin's first year with fe- 
male students. And if you think 
it's strange, think about how the 
girls feel! 

Since September, eight new ex- 
periences have been gracing the 
Bowdoin campus. Tricia Luther, 
71, Liz Leighton '71, and Enid 
Zafran '70 came from Mt. Holy- 
oke; Wheaton contributed Mardy 
Kirkpatrick '71 and Sue Aivano 
'70; Smith sent Ursala Mancusi- 
Ungaro '72; and Connecticut Col- 
lege donated Jill Foster .'70 and 
Sue Jacobson '71. Bowdoin gen- 
erously contributed housing at 72 
Federal Street, an ex-Dean's 
house. The house contains four 
bedrooms, million of bathrooms, 
three living rooms, a garage that 
stores anything from wood to mo- 
tor vehicles, a kitchen, a living 
room and a bar. The college also 
supplied a television and kitchen 
fixtures. The house is variously 
described as "beautiful," "out of 
sight," and "fantastic." The only 
lacking facility was a peephole 
on the outside door which was 
promptly installed last week. 

The girls are majoring in Re- 
ligion, Classics, History, English 
and French. Coming from as far 
away as Florida and Ohio, they 
all seem to like Bowdoin. As Trish 
said, voicing the opinion of most 
of them, "everyone is treating 
us like princesses — especially 



the students." At first the girls 
stuck together, they say, and so 
embarrassed males felt it impos- 
sible to casually strike up a con- 
versation with all eight of them. 
Later, as they started to go out 
on dates, and Mardy even trans- 
ferred her board bill to Deke, they 
evidently seemed more like peo- 
ple and less like legends. Lately, 
they say they are meeting very 
interesting people through their 
classes and meals, since the stu- 
dents are no longer afraid to 
strike up a casual conversation. 

The girls can eat at either the 
Union or the Senior Center. Of- 
ten, though, they go to fraterni- 
ties for meals and discussions. 
They are very impressed with 
how eager the fraternities are to 
schedule something interesting, 
and these activities sometimes are 
continued for a period of days. 
The college, too, has been bend- 
ing over backwards for them; re- 
cently the Athletic Department 
scheduled hours for them to use 
the swimming pool, and there are 
two regular . cheerleaders in the 
contingent. 

Academically, most believe the 
work load to be heavier at Bow- 
doin than at their respective 
schools. They Teally enjoy 
classes, and have found the Bow- 
doin faculty generally very help- 
ful. They are also impressed with 
the openness of Bowdoin students. 
This contributes substantially to 
the quality of classes at Bowdoin, 
they feel. 

Most of them have only a few 
minor complaints, although some 



Bowdoin Family Lends 
Name And Tradition 



* By FRED CUSICK 

Baudoin? Boduoin? Boden? 
Bowden? Question: What do all 
these names have, in common? 
Answer: The College is named af- 
ter everyone of them! They are 
examples of the various spellings 
and misspellings that the name 
Bowdoin has gone through. The 
name of Bowdoin has had an in- 
teresting history. One which is 
little known to students, despite 
the proliferation in the bookstore 
of T-shirts, sweatshirts, ashtrays, 
and cocktail glasses all bearing 
the name of Bowdoin. 



G&B Liberation Vetoed 



Bad Rads Eye Man 5 Pad 



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No revolutionary move- 
ment can endure without a 
stable organisation of leaders 
maintaining continuity. 
The broader the popular mass 
drawn spontaneously into the 
struggle, which forms the basis 
of the movement and partici- 
pates in it, the more urgent the 
need for such an organization, 
and the more solid this organi- 
zation must be. ." . ." 

Lenin. "What is to be Done" 

Bowdoin SDS has been in the 
process of discovering the validity 
of these maxims. Recently the 
SDS has embarked on a struggle 
for the rights of the campus 
workers. In so doing they are at- 
tempting to establish their cre- 
dentials as revolutionaries. They 
are attempting to do so while 
split into two camps. One camp 
consists of those who believe in 
the efficacy of action by the lead- 
ers in building for change; the 
other camp believes that action 
is successful when not only the 



leaders but also the masses (in 
this case the campus workers) 
join in the struggle. These two 
camps clashed at the SDS meet- 
ing last Thursday night. 

The meeting last Thursday be- 
gan with the election of a new 
chairman, John Asatrian. He was 
elected for two reasons; because 
he is well thought of, and more 
important because his opinions 
are so inconclusive as to appear 
innocuous. 

Once "compromise" candidate 
Asatrian had been elected, the 
meeting turned to the SDS's cur- 
rent cause, the campus workers. 
John Liftman proposed that the 
SDS demonstrate in the office of 
Mr. Brush, whose remarks about 
the campus workers have been 
attacked by the SDS as cruel and 
anti-proletarian. Liffman felt that 
the SDS could demonstrate its 
solidarity with the workers by at- 
tacking the same things they felt 
badly about. His proposal was im- 
mediately attacked on the 

(Please turn to page 5) 



Mr. Robert Volz, Special Col- 
lections Librarian, has prepared 
a display of the Bowdoin papers 
on the second floor of Hawthorne- 
Longfellow. The display traces 
the history of the Bowdoin fam- 
ily in America. 

The first Bowdoin was Peter, 
who came to America from 
France at the beginning of the 
18th century. Unlike most of their 
Boston neighbors the Bowdoins 
were not English but French 
Protestants. They attended the 
French church in Boston. Peter 
was granted some Maine lands 
and the few records we have of 
him are in connection with a sur- 
vey of those lands. 

Peter's son James enlarged his 
estate several fold. He was a mer- 
chant in Boston and at the time 
of his death in 1747 his estate was 
(Please turn to page 6) 

Kcndrick Chapel 

At ten o'clock Wednesday 
morning President Howell opened 
a brief chapel service in memory 
of the late Dean of the College, 
Nathan Kendrick. Dean Kendrick 
came to Bowdoin in 1933 as assist- 
ant professor of History; in 1950 
he was elected Dean of the Col- 
lege and served in this capacity 
until his retirement in 1965. 

Professor Nathan Dane gave a 
brief eulogy citing Professor 
Kendrick's service to the college 
and hi.'- long lasting impression on 
a generation of Bowdoin men. 
Professor Dane said that Profes- 
sor Kendrick retained a "New 
England soul beneath a carefree 
exterior." As Professor Dane 
pointed out, 'Nathan Kendrick's 
humanity was seen in a love and 
zest for life." 

The chapel service was at- 
tended by several faculty mem- 
bers and students despite the tor. 
rential rains which hampered the 
day's activities. 



think that students here are more 
interested in talking to a girl than 
to any one of them as a person. 
Other than that, the most com- 
mon complaint is their distance 
from the campus. They seem con- 
cerned about the prevalence of 
wolves on the paths. 

Four of the girls plan to remain 
here next semester. There had 
originally been some question as 
to whether that number could be 
accommodated. The house on 
Federal Street is, in the opinion 
of its boarders, filled nearly to 
capacity. However, the policy of 
the College is that any girl who 
wishes to stay will be allowed to, 
although this will limit the num- 
ber of new exchange students who 
can be expected for next semes- 
ter: 

As for next year, the main 
question is how to expand the 
program. Bowdoin received more 
applicants both to go elsewhere 
and to work here than it could 
accept. The essential problem is 
housing. The College is consider- 
ing both the current Phi Delta 
Psi house and one floor of a dorm 
as possible solutions to an ex- 
panded program. 

Johnson Says 
Biafra Relief 
Helps The War 

By FREDERICK CUSICK 

The Biafran war came to Bow- 
doin last Monday night. The Stu- 
dent Council meeting in the Gal- 
lery Lounge had been moving 
along smoothly when the by now 
traditional "Give Up a Meal for 
Biafra" resolution was proposed. 
The measure was in the process 
of being tabled until next week 
when Bob Johnson, President of 
Afro-Am, objected to it. Johnson 
said that the sending of food to 
the starving Biafrans would only 
serve to prolong the war. He de- 
nounced the war as an attempt 
by the "imperialistic" countries 
to divide Nigeria, the largest 
country in Afrjca. It would be 
better, he suggested, if someone 
were to assassinate Lt . Col. 
Ojukwu, the Biafran leader. 
There being no motion for O- 
juku's assassination the matter 
was tabled until next week. 

The Council also listened to a 
report on the Zeta Psi orienta- 
tion problem. The conclusion of 
Peter Mulcahey, chairman of the 
newly organized orientation com- 
mittee, was that the Council 
could do nothing in the matter. 

The Council also passed two 
resolutions calling for the aboli- 
tion of the Swimming and Cal re- 
quirements. The almost unani- 
mous majorities that passed these 
measures were taken as signs of 
the growing student unrest over 
the requirements. 

Admissions Figures 

The Admissions Office released 
figures today on applicants for 
Early Admission. Applications 
were submitted by men as far 
away as California, Florida, and 
Turkey. There were 234 appli- 
cants, an increase of 72 over the 
previous year. 

Director of Admissions Richard 
W. Moll emphasized the impor- 
tance of the geographical distri- 
bution. In previous years, he said, 
Early Decision applications came 
almost strictly from Maine and 
Massachusetts. Now over half of 
the country is represented, with 
four men applying from the far 
west and 15 from the middle west. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1969 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Volume XCIX 



Friday, November 7, 1969 



Number 6 



World Enough And Time 

Nixon's speech Monday evening may well serve as the 
symbol of the beginning of the end of American democracy. 
On its face, the speech differed little from those of Lyndon 
Johnson; and this in itself is distressing, ior it means that years 
of debate and study and experience have done very little to 
change the American Government's self-image. 

Neither side has conducted itself in a very moral way, but 
in Nixon's mind the onus falls entirely on North Vietnam. We 
are still the only "hope the world has for the survival of peace 
ami freedom." North Vietnam is solely responsible for the con- 
tinuation of the war. "It's become clear that the obstacle in 
negotiating an end to the war is not the President of the United 
States. It is not the South Vietnamese Government. The ob- 
stacle is the other side's absolute refusal to show the least wil- 
lingness to join us in seeking a just peace." 

Nixon's brief history of the war neglects, without a word 
of explanation, all that we have learned about the history of 
our involvement. For Nixon it is simply the history of an in- 
creasing American commitment. "In response to the request of 
the Government of South Vietnam . . ." ". . . to assist the 
• people of South Vietnam in their efforts to prevent a Com- 
munist takeover." If there has been anything wrong in our 
commitment it is that "we're an impatient people," "a do-it- 
yourself people" and we tried to win the war for the South 
Vietnamese instead of letting them win it for themselves. 

Many Americans, those who oppose the war and those 
who have given serious thought to both sides, must have been 
disappointed in Nixon's failure to even try to explain so many 
of the questionable statements he made. At the very least he 
could have explained how free elections would be possible. But 
his purpose was not to explain; it was to buy time and support 
to carry on the war as he sees fit. 

What is most significant about the speech and most alarm- 



ing is that Nixon made no attempt to talk to Americans who 
disagree with the war or questions its wisdom. The address 
was not to "my fellow Americans," but to "the great silent 
majority of my fellow Americans." Nixon did not explain; he 
dictated to Americans the things they must believe if they are 
to be patriots. 

"I know it may not be fashionable to speak of patriot- 
ism. ..." Nixon has broken our choices down to two simple 
ones: "precipitate withdrawal" "without regard to effects" or 
the way of patriotism and national destiny. The "easy way" 
or the "right way." "North Vietnam cannot defeat or humili- 
ate the United States. Only Americans can do that." Nixon 
gave us the party line on how we are to achieve peace and 
freedom for the world. 

Nixon grants that we have the right to reach different 
conclusions; but, according to him, the truth is that war critics 
represent irrationalism and seek to "impose" their will upon the 
majority. If they succeed "this nation has no future as a free 
society." Thus, war critics are irrational, unpatriotic, cowardly, 
and a threat to this country's freedom.' 

Now, combine this speech with Agnew's remarks on the 
character of Vietnam war critics and protestors, and with 
Nixon's appeal, in his inaugural, to "the great majority of 
Americans, the forgotten Americans, the non-shouters. the 
non -demonstrators." As I. F. Stone remarked, "F.D.R. had 
stirred the nation with "the forgotten man." But this was an 
appeal to compassion for the underprivileged. Nixon's was an 
appeal to the prejudices of those who had made it, to 
the middle class and white collar workers now fearful of those 
pushing up from below." 

One can have little doubt that Nixon has stopped trying 
to fashion a concensus and is seeking to polarize this country 
by creating a silent majority which will turn upon the articu- 
late, concerned minority. If Nixon is trying to silence criticism 
in order to free his hands to do things his way. then he shows 
an appalling ignorance of what a free society is and is closing 
the doors on non-violent reform. 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 
Member of the United States Student Press Association 

Mltar 
Alaa Kolod 



MuMctay Editor 

Jay Sweat 

Newe Editor 

Be* Naafc 



Martin 



Huiiw 
Fred Laacenaaa 
AdTerUelaa M anacer 

ftftvMsJsMS 

Oalca Huipi 
Bo* Anaatreac 

CiFralation Manager 
BUI H.rpin 



Aha Kate*. 



EDITORIAL BOABD 
Jar Sweet. Martia 



. BaS Nana, Jaaa Wetoj. 



Paal 



Faat 



THE BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
A. P. Daccctt. 1. P. Gruicr, Alaa Kalad. Fred Laacaraaaa. 



weakly when rlaaaaa are bald during; tha Fall and Spring Samaatar by the 

of Bowdoin GUIaga. Addraea editorial communication* to taa Editor and 

and aaaaorlpttoa eommanleatioiu to taa Baalniai Maaacar at taa ORIENT. 

Union. Bowdoin OaUaaw, Bmnewick. Ma. 04S11. Rapraaantad faa national 

by taa National Bdoaattowal Admttiatac Banrlaa. lac. Second etaae paetoaa 

at Bra—wlai. Ma. 04011 Taa aaaaariptlea lata la *«* (I) datlara (or oaa year. 



SDS And Workers 



To the Editor: 

A lot of people have become confused about the 
situation concerning campus workers at Bowdoin. 
I would like to say a few things about recent Orient 
articles and their relationship to the SDS leaflet. 
What I say is not an official rebuttal by SDS, but 
simply my own feelings. First of all, people might be 
wondering where SDS got the information for our 
leaflet. The fact is that virtually all the information 
in the leaflet came from discussions with campus 
workers about conditions and from students' own 
experiences on the job. In fact, before we put out 
the leaflet, we showed it to a number of campus 
workers to make sure the facts were correct. 

Have the facts been refuted? In the Oct. 17 Ori- 
ent article, John Brush, administrative head of 
Grounds and Buildings, attempted a rebuttal. 
Brush's statements, when he's not openly attacking 
campus workers as stupid etc., are close to absurd. 
"Brush contends that the college was helping the 
union effort in every way possible." If this is true, 
why would the college make the leader of the drive 
"part of management and management doesn't usu- 
ally involve itself in unionizing." I ask Mr. Brush, 
if this isn't "buying off" what is. Bosses have always 
tried to buy off worker's leaders. If Allen was really 
"honest" he would have been true to his responsi- 
bility to the other workers. 

Ui regard to the Gordon Linen strike, Brush said 
that he felt it was his obligation to provide linen 
service to the students. A strike is not a carnival. 
One must choose sides. You either buy California 
grapes and support the grapeowners or you don't 
buy them and support the striking pickers. Similar- 
ly with the linen. The fact is that the college did 
scab on the Gordon drivei-s. Brush also said that 
Bowdoin is one of Gordon's smaller accounts and 
his actions could not make or break the strike. We 
never said otherwise. The college did, however, con- 
tribute to a New England wide attempt to break 
the strike. It is unrefuted. 

The Orient did not attempt to refute our figures 
for the wages on campus. Brush did say that pay 
scales are commensurate with average wages in the 
Brunswick area. He is right. However, that is not 
the point. Wages all over Maine ar atrocious. The 
average Maine wage is 48th out of 50 states. A siz- 
able minority of the population is living in poverty 
conditions by US govt, standards. The US Dept. of 
Labor says that a family of four needs $9000 to live 
moderately. Most Bowdoin workers are lucky to 
get half that amount. That the college's wages are 
not under average for the area is a hollow truth. 

As far as student wages are concerned t e two 
editions of the Orient give different points of view. 
Brush says part time help is part time help and as 
far as the boss is concerned why should they re- 
ceive the same wage. However, in the Oct. 24 issue, 
Walter Moulton disagrees asserting that it^wQuld 
be more efficient to hire all full time help and that 
the college intentionally leaves jobs for students in 
order to help them. I think Mr. Brush comes closer 
to the truth of the matter, from the bosses' point 
of view, part-time help at a lower wage is great. If 
Mr. Moulton is right and the college is only hiring 
students to help them why don't they receive the 
same wages as full-time workers. Moulton lies when 
he says all students meet the minimum of $1.45. 
Some first-year student workers in the library re- 
ceive $1.30. Ask Mr. Monke, in the Oct. 17 Orient 
he admitted it. 

Concerning the account of the woman who the 
college tried to pay $1.55, Mr. Pinette forgot to add 
that the reason she had been on a leave of absence 
for a year is that she was sick from overwork and 
her doctor told her she should leave work. Also 
since she returned, she has not received the raise 
given in the period of her absence. 

I have tried to show that I don't feel that the 
Orient articles basically refuted any of the facts in 
the SDS leaflet. The lew wages are still there, the 
college did take away two paid holidays, students 
receive even lower wages than full-time workers, 
and for all its explanations, the college did "buy 
off" the organizing effort leader. 

The other aspect of the Orient, Oct. 24, article 
is that workers don't feel that grievances exist, and 
in any case, want to have nothing to do with SDS. 
Undoubtedly It's true that Bowdoin workers aren't 
going to go on strike next week, nor does SDS want 
to push them into that. However I feel the Orient 
misrepresented the feelings of many campus workr 
ers. A lot of people don't like the fact that they 
work hard for low wages and get paid holidays tak- 
en away. In the Orient article only two campus 
workers are quoted. One. Mr. Allen, is part of man- 
agement; the other, Larry, Pinette, is a head chef. 
As Allen said many of the workers are reluctant to 
speak publicly. If students really want to find out 
what the campus workers think, they should talk 
to them. 

Larry Pinette said SDS really doesn't care about 
the workers and just wants to cause trouble. I think 
he's dead wrong. In fact around the country SDS 
has consistently fought for demands in the interest 
of workers. At Columbia and Harvard SDS has 
fought university expansion into worker's commu- 
nities. We have also fought against the Vietnam 
war, which workers pay for in high taxes, inflation 
and blood. Although many college administrators 
and newspapers have tried to portray SDS people 
as wanting destruction for kicks. The facts prove 
different. 



It is not unnatural, however, that workers should 
be wary cf SDS. Because we have not made real 
ties with campus workers there is no reason why 
they should disbelieve what they read. I think, how- 
ever, that this antagonism can be broken down. 
When workers see that SDS is serious about a pro- 
wcrking class approach, it will be harder to spread 
ideas that SDS is a bunch of crazy rich kids. 

I think that students need to ally with campus 
workers in order to better conditions. On many 
campuses college administrators have been able to 
• stop workers drives for better conditions by using 
students as scabs. On campuses where a movement 
among students has been built to support workers, 
this has been possible and workers have succeeded 
in gaining both wages and conditions. Furthermore, 
after college, many students will be teachers, social 
workers, and technicians who will need to ally with 
campus workers to improve their own conditions. 

In summation I have tried to show that the points 
brought up by the SDS leaflet are still valid, and 
that an alliance of campus workers and students 
can best serve both groups. 

DAVE GORDON 

Anent? Amen! 



Sir; 

Anent the recent outraged chirpings of certain 
persons of the Students for a Democratic Society, 
I commend to the public a saying of the late jour- 
nalist, Mr. H. L. Mencken : "The fact that I have no 
remedy for all the sorrows of the world Is no rea- 
son for my accepting yours. It simply supports the 
strong probability that yours is a fake." 

(Chorus of Amens) 

C. T. IRWIN '70 

Questioning Politics 

Wednesday's mourning demonstration, "Moratori- 
um," emphasizes an essential aspect of the person- 
ality cf our times; we live in an age when we must 
question our politics. We have discovered new sen- 
sibilities, new emotions, new involvements, and 
they have expanded into social movements protest- 
ing race relations, poverty, and war. We have sat, 
picketed, marched, hoped, and prayed for peace be- 
tween all breeds of men and this we have clearly 
conducted with the underlying belief that the pen 
will become mightier than the sword. America is 
engaged in a war in Vietnam, a war in which she 
did not intend to become so massively involved; 
and it is this war which we question most in our 
age of inquiry. 

Political and social protest in the United States 
is for the mest part channeled along the limits of 
our Constitutional rights as citizens. More often we 
have gathered our bodies in protest than our beliefs, 
^sp-kesman f„r a crowd often clouds your own be- 
,liets and leaves you more dismayed than convinced 
by your involvements. Americans have not ava led 
themselves cf one of their most effective channels 
for protest, the Post Office. If the majority of the 
public conveyed their true convictions concerning 
the Vietnam war at one time by writing the Presi- 
dent one letter a day for cne week, the common- 
wealth of our concern for peace will be substantial- 
ly communicated without the fear that the good 
will of our personal opinions will be overlooked or 
lost in the words of a spokeman for the crowd or of 
our elected representatives. 

The timetable for your protest is to mail your 
letters daily beginning November 9 and continuing 
through November 15 to Richard M. Nixon, Presi- 
dent of the United States, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave- 
nue, Washington, D.C. 20006. 

On November 12 the bulk of your opinions will 
reach and pass through the doors of the White 
House. The letter-in can be an impetus to the 
march, perhaps be even more effective. The White 
House staff will open each of your letters and your 
beliefs wilj be noted. An estimated sixty million let- 
ters will arrive at the White House on Wednesday, 
the first day of your protest. 

Use the following procedure in mailing your let- 
ters : 1 ) Type the address. Use the Zip Code. Busi- 
ness and institutional envelopes may be used. 2) 
Use first class postage . . . Special Delivery and even 
better, registered mail (it must be signed for) will 
insure faster delivery. 

President Nixon may never read your letter as 
such but he will be intimately reminded cf your 
convictions for peace. We have a message to give 
to President Nixon. Let us be united in a common 
effort to express our beliefs as Americans. 

JOHN J. LEVY and WILL LONG 
Chairmen, P.O. Letter Committee 

Why Moratorium? 

President Nixon asks for our support for his Viet- 
nam policy. 

He assures us, based on past performance aver- 
ages, that after 22,500 more G.I.'s get killed 135,000 
more G.I.'s get wounded. 350,000 more of our South 
Vietnamese allies, military and civilian, are killed. 
wounded and made homeless, and 100 billion dollars 
more of our taxes are wasted in three more years 
of national agony, the war will be at an end. 

What's all this racket about a moratorium? 

Hurrah! Hurrah! Hurrah! for Nixon. 

BENJ. REDMOND 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE FIVE 



Mulcahy Serves Two Masters Grad Schools Grab Grads 



(Continued from page 1) 

the off-campus hunt When asked what he thought 
of his situation, Ferreira said, "I know personally of 
frats who've done worse than we've done. We were 
just unfortunate that we didn't even realize it was 
bad." Furthermore, the president argued that fra- 
ternity orientation was being blown out of propor- 
tion by the anti-fraternity segment of the adminis- 
tration. The anti-intellectual attitude ascribed to 
the fraternities by the Pierce Committee, accord- 
ing to Ferreira, should have been replaced by the 
term "non-intellectual" — an attitude that he 
thought was necessary to counterbalance the to- 
tally academic side of a student's character. 

The rules concerning orientation as they stand 
prohibit its being taken off campus and its being 
used as a form of degradation of the freshmen. 
Along with the rules is a strong attitude that orien- 
tation should take no time away from a freshman's 
academic pursuits. 

Zeta Psi's case is now being considered by the 
Student Council. At the Council's last meeting, 
Peter Mulcahy, Zete's Orientation Chairman, 
argued that the orientation rules were "vaguely 
denned," and that it would be ". . . impossible to 
take action because of the inconsistencies and am- 
biguities of the orientation program this year." 

Despite whether or not Zeta Psi receives some 
sort of punishment by the Council, the real blame 
for the "ambiguity" of the situation lies with those 
whose job it was to see that no ambiguity existed. 
The body authorized to control and prevent abuses 
of orientation by the fraternities was supposedly 
the Student Council Orientation Committee. This 
committee, however, was not in existence until a 
week ago. Its members were never re-organized to 
serve on this year's Committee; consequently it 
was a totally ineffective body and has yet to meet 
this year. It is also interesting to note that the 
Chairman of the Student Council Orientation Com- 
mittee, Peter Mulcahy, is also Chairman of the 
Zeta Psi Orientation Committee. The incongruity 



has only begun, for no one seems to agree on whose 
job the responsibility of orientation control rests. 
John Cole, the President of the Student Council, 
stated that it is ". ... my personal belief that the 
Orientation Committee should be controlled and 
enforced by the Student Life Committee. Dean 
Nyhus said that this Committee would meet to 
discuss the Pierce Report recommendation, but the 
matter of enforcement, of current definition of poli- 
cy, and consequently of the fate of Zeta Psi, was 
completely up to the Student Council to determine. 
Perhaps Anthony Ferreira put it best when he 
expressed his reaction to Zeta's sudden predica- 
ment: "I feel the Student Council bit off more than 
it could chew in regulating campus wide orienta- 
tion. They were simply caught with their pants 
down." 

If the Student Council feels some embarrassment 
at being caught in a rather awkward position, it has 
a partner in sorrow in the college administration. 
Earlier this year Dean Nyhus met with the Frater- 
nity Presidents' Council and orientation was among 
the things he talked about. It was charged that 
this "talk" was obscure and (you guessed it) am- 
biguous. When asked about this charge, the Dean 
brought up the misunderstanding with the Student 
Council about their non-existent Orientation Com- 
mittee as being partly the fault for not having a 
more lucid policy. The administration, he said, was 
thus placed in "an untenable position." What Dean 
Nyhus told the fraternity presidents were in effect 
". . . some suggestions for guidelines," unaware at 
the time that the Student Council Orientation Com- 
mittee was not as independent as he had assumed. 
The presidents were reported to have greeted the 
Dean's talk with "knowing glances," and walked 
out confident in the immutability of Bowdoin trad- 
ition. What happens to this tradition will be de- 
cided by what happens to the quest for an effective 
control of campus orientation. It will also be de- 
cided by the Student Life Committee's action on 
the Pierce Recommendation. But that is another 
story. 



Counselor Will Provide Expert Guidance 



By FRED CUSICK 

Dr. Cowing is plump, graying, 
and fortyish (I don't know if he's 
anywhere near forty, but he has 
that fortyish look that busy men 
pick up in their early thirties.). 
He's a psychologist; not a psychi- 
atrist. He provides a chair for his 
clients; not a couch. His title is 
College Counselor. 

Every student has several indi- 
viduals that he can turn to if he 
has a problem. If the problem is 
medical or dental he can see Dr. 
Hanley or the nurse at the Infir- 
mary. If the problem is academic, 
his teachers, his academic advi- 
sor, the Dean of Students, and 
even private tutorial help, are 
available. Personal problems can 
be taken to parents or friends. 
The function of the College Coun- 
selor is to handle problems in all 
of these areas. 

"I really don't know what a lit- 
tle problem is. Let's say that you 
have a person with slightly 
crooked teeth. The teeth are nice 
and bright but slightly crooked. 
Suppose the person is embarras- 
sed every time he smiles. It's pos- 
sible that he could take a nega- 
tive view towards life because of 
that. Now in this case are the 
crooked teeth a big problem? You 
could say that from a rational 
point of view they're not, but this 
person may adopt a negative life 
style because of them. 

"Alright, let's say that a guy 
has a gal problem. Now is that 
important? Suppose he's imma- 
ture; in need of a mother figure 
and he finds a girl who has all the 
qualities he wants. She's warm, 
and affectionate, and she mothers 
him. Alright suppose he marries 
her. What's going to happen when 
he matures and he no longer 
needs mothering?" 

"The problem is that young 
men of 19 and 20 have to make 
decisions that will effect them 
when they're forty, fifty, sixty- 
five, and seventy. 

"Alright, let's go back to mar- 
riage. Most young men's criteria 
for choosing a girl has very little 
to do with what sort of wife she'll 
be. Most young men pick a girl 




because she's pretty. Because she 
has big boobs, generally, or be- 
cause she's a good dancer. They 
never see her during most of the 
day when she's doing housework, 
or cooking, or is engaged in child - 
care. . . . Our courtship practices 
in this country are separated by 
a wide gulf from reality." 

"Sometimes," Dr. Cowing said, 
"we get transient problems. Just 
the other day a fellow came to 
me. His fiance's mother was dying 
of cancer. Now that's a transient 
problem. The individual will get 
over the pain resulting from the 
death, but in the meantime he 
needs some help." 

I asked Dr. Cowing how much 
of an effect did he think he could 
have on student problems with an 
uphill ratio of about 1000 to 1. "I 
think that I can have some effect. 
You know every student who has 
a problem can see faculty, doc- 
tors, parents, academic advisors, 
or the Dean of Students. The 
College Counselor is just another 
person he can see. He's another 
opportunity for help." 

I asked him how busy he was. 
"That chair hasn't been empty 
yet today." he said. "It should still 
be warm." It was. 



SDS . . . 



(Continued from page S) 

grounds that a demonstration 
without proper groundwork might 
tend to alienate the workers by 
showing the SDS in a poor light. 
SDS's poor reputation nation- 
wide, it was stated, is due in part 
to its "effetly snobbish" activi- 
ties on behalf of groups not en- 
tirely desirous of SDS support. 
It was suggested that it would be 
better to plan activity in concert 
with the workers rather than on 
their behalf. For several inter- 
minable minutes various mem- 
bers of the group repeated these 
positions. The representative of 
the Afro-Ams. left. This was re- 
marked, but no one paid any at- 
tention, since ail hands were up. 

Chairman Asatrian called the 
matter to a vote. A vote was tak- 
en, a tie, which was broken by 
Asatrian's vote for the demon- 
stration. At this point several 
people left, and several came in. 
A successful attempt was made 
to reopen the question; and the 
demonstration was defeated. 



By JOHN WEISS 

Most Bowdoin students are aware of only a small number of career 
opportunities. Often two thirds of an incoming class state their prefer- 
ence for either law or medicine. By senior year, and sometimes by 
graduation or later, Bowdoin students come face to face with a choice 
often far removed from medicine or law. In recent years larger num- 
bers of Bowdoin graduates for various reasons are turning to military 
service and to secondary school teaching. As in the past many alumni 
lean towards graduate schools, law, medicine, business schools, and to 
business and government. 

Many underclassmen and seniors fail to take advantage of the coun- 
ciling and placement service which the school offers. The placement 
centeV is located next to the college chapel and is headed by Mr. Sam- 
uel Ladd. A large number of businesses and a smaller number of vary- 
ing types of graduate schools send representatives to Bowdoin. Mr. 
Ladd stated, "Approximately 100 to 125 companies come to Bowdoin, 
mostly in the Spring; but many more are in touch with us and send 
information. About 15 accounting, engineering, and business graduate 
schools send representatives here. A number of federal agencies also 
come. We urge people to register for interview whether they are plan- 
ning to go into military service or not. Many times in the past, after 
three years of military service, an alumni has been placed in a paying 
job with a firm he was merely interviewed by in the Spring of his senior 
year." According to the statistics compiled by Mr. Pulsifer, Assistant 
Director of the Senior Center, eighty of last year's seniors went into 
business, government or had plans" uncertain or unknown. "Another 
thirty-eight graduates, many attracted by the favorable draft status 
of teachers, went into secondary school teaching. A large number of 
these alumni expressed the desire to eventually take a position in busi- 
ness or government. According to Mr. Ladd, "About eighty seniors are, 
enrolled in the program now and we would like to have more." 

Traditionally Bowdoin sends many of its graduates onto medical, 
dental, law, business, and a variety of other graduate schools. Twelve 
of last year's graduates enrolled or had plans to enroll in a business or 
accounting graduate school. Dean Abramson explained the trend in 
business school admissions policies. "They want people with mathe- 
matics and statistics and who are quantitatively inclined, but they still 
are looking for the well rounded student. Most schools prefer people 
who have finished with their military service." It is not at all unusual 
for a business school to fill only 25% of its incoming class with gradu- 
ating seniors. One Phi Beta Kappa at Bowdoin (class of 69) was ac- 
cepted to Harvard, Columbia, and Chicago law schools but was turned 
down at Harvard business school. The top business schools, according 
to a representative from Dartmouth's Amos Tuck school, accept one 
out of every 7 or 8 applicants. Despite this fact, however, there are 
enough business schools and enough yearly openings to assure admit- 
tance to at least one school for most candidates. Dr. Shipman or Dean 
Abramson should be contacted by interested students. 

Law schools are also plentiful and like business schools the most 
prestigious schools are highly selective. 24 members of the class of 
69 have enrolled in law schools from Munich to Denver. 9 more gradu- 
ates expressed their desire to attend law school some time in the fu- 
ture. The "pre-law" curriculum formerly was centered largely on 
English, History, Government, and Philosophy. More recently many 
law schools have, as Dean Nyhus stated, "recognized the need to take 
more of the Ralph Nader type who are familiar with scientific' terms 
and have had a more technical college education." More than most 
graduate schools, law schools place emphasis on the graduate place- 
ment exams, in this case the I.SAT or Law School Admissions Test. 
Barron's Guide to Law Schools is very careful to state what range of 
scores each law school will accept. But like business schools there 
seems to be a "law school for everyone." Dr. Daggett is in charge of 
pre law counciling at Bowdoin. 

Medical schools seem to be the most selective graduate schools. Ap- 
proximately 9,700 places are available for the next crop of college 
graduates, but there are over 23,000 people applying to medical school 
for the fall of 1970. With the average applicant filling out seven or 
eight applications, schools such as 'the University of Connecticut found 
themselves with 1000 applicants in 1968 and only thirty places. Rutgers 
had 573 applicants and only places for sixteen frosh. Many applicants 
from Bowdoin's class of '69 were unable to gain acceptance to any med- 
ical school. Of approximately twenty-five applicants only fourteen are 
now attending a school. In the previous year twenty-four seniors won 
places in medical schools and only a few were rejected at all the schools 
they applied to. Many people attribute the skyrocketing number of ap- 
plicants to the favorable draft status which medical students and 
dental students enjoy. Another problem is the reluctance or inability 
of medical schools to increase the size of the entering classes. Medical 
schools usually require a minimal average of B- (at Bowdoin H-?) and, 
as they cryptically state it, "satisfactory scores on the Medical College 
Admissions Test." Dr. James Moulton is Bowdoin's premedical advisor. 

Many Bowdoin students choose to do graduate work toward a mas- 
ters or a Ph.D. English, History, Chemistry, Biology, and Psychology 
departments place a number of graduates each year into post gradu- 
ate programs. Since the lifting of the differment for graduate students 
three years ago fewer Bowdoin students are going directly into gradu- 
ate school. . . . Many recent alumni express the desire to attend gradu- 
ate schools after the war ends, or when they stop teaching. 

As an added service room 2-C at the Senior Center is open from 
7:00 to. 10:00 p.m. every Wednesday night. There are many graduate 
school and professional school catalogues available. By contacting 
Doug Sewall, extension 505, the room may be used at other times. 



For Letters To The Editor, Write: 
EDITOR 
THE ORIENT 
Moulton Union 
Campus 



PAGE SIX 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



"THE C-5A cargo transport, it de- 
velops, will cost at least twice the 
original estimate. Alan Cranston 
is California's other senator, a 
scourge of the military-industrial 
complex. The C-5A is built by 
Lockheed, of Burbank, Califor- 
nia. Why did Cranston vote for 
the C-5A? Because, as he 
explained, a fleet of these 
transports might make possible 
the evacuation I For a f rti copy of 
of AmericanM NATIONAL RE- 
troops fromW VIEW, writ*: D.pt. 
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Bowdoin Leaves Name, 
Traditions To College 



FRIDAY/NOVEMBER 7, 1969 

Quartet Plays 
Here Monday 



(Continued from page S) 

the largest ever probated in Suf- 
folk County. James I established 
the financial solidarity of the 
family. 

Two sevenths of his father's 
estate went to James II. James 
II was an entrepeneur and poli- 
tician. The College is named in 
honor of him. James was a Har- 
vard graduate (1751), a friend of 
Franklin's with whom he corres- 
ponded, the President of the 
American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, and the Governor of 
Massachusetts during Shay's re ? 
bellion. He was a leader in the 
Boston independence movement 
and was united, though more of- 
ten divided, with Hancock, Otis, 
and Samuel Adams. History shows 
that James was a somewhat tardy 
revolutionary, partly through 
sickness and partly because he 
did not believe until late in 1776 
that separation from the Crown 
was necessary. He was supposed 
to lead the Massachusetts delega- 
tion to the Continental Congress 
but sickness prevented him and so 
Hancock got to sign the Declara- 
tion of Independence instead of 
Bowdoin. 

Bowdoin could be viscious in his 
political dealings. He had the cor- 
respondence of the royal gover- 
nor, Bernard, stolen and published 
in an attempt to discredit him 
As a member of the Harvard 
Board of Overseers he headed a 
committee which charged Han- 
cock, the Treasurer, with misman- 
agement of funds. The feud be- 
tween Bowdoin and Hancock 
lasted until their deaths. One of 
the reasons it took so long to es- 
tablish the College was because 
Hancock, who was Governor of 
Massachusetts, could not tolerate 



the idea of naming a college after 
Bowdoin. 

James Bowdoin II died in 1790. 
His son, James Bowdoin III pro- 
vided the money to start the Col- 
lege in his father's memory. Like 
his father he suffered from poor 
health. He spent most of his life 
raising sheep on a farm in Dor- 
chester. The Bowdoin books, 
which are now in the library, were 
for the most part his. James III 
was that rare creature, a Jeffer- 
sonian in Federalist Massachu- 
setts. He corresponded with Jef- 
ferson and served as his minister 
to Spain from 1805 to 1808. Bow- 
doin sent Jefferson a copy of the 
translation he had once made of 
a French book on sheep raising to 
which the President had tact 
enough to make a polite reply. 

When James III died the main 
line of the family became extinct. 
Most of the estate went to a neph- 
ew, James Bowdoin Temple, on 
the condition that he change his 
name to Bowdoin and always live 
in America. A few years later 
Temple moved to England and 
the College, which was one of the 
heirs, sued for the entire estate 
on the grounds that Temple had 
violated the terms of the will. The 
College won some money but 
Temple retained the bulk of the 
estate. 

The Bowdoin family no longer 
exists. They can only be found in 
the art museum among the paint- 
ings from the Colonial and Fed- 
eral periods and in the Bowdoin 
books in the library. Mr. Volz 
has prepared an excellent cata- 
logue on the Bowdoin papers. 
Anyone interested in the history 
of the College and why Bowdoin 
is Bowdoin and not Hancock or 
Adams should look at the display 
on the second floor of the library. 

Frederick Cusick 



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Works by Haydn, Bartok and 
Mendelssohn will be performed by 
the famed Curtis String Quartet 
in a concert at Bowdoin College 
Monday night. The program, 
opening event of Bowdoin's 1969- 
70 Curtis-Zimbalist Concert Se- 
ries, will be presented at 8:15 p.m. 
in Pickard Theater, Memorial 
Hall. 

Single tickets at $2.50 are avail- 
able in advance at the Informa- 
tion Desk in the College's Moul- 
ton Union or may be purchased at 
the door. Also available at the 
door will be children's tickets at 
50c, and $10 season tickets for all 
sue events in the Curtis-Zimbalist 
series. 

The Monday evening program 
will include Quartet in C major, 
Opus 54, No. 2, by Haydn; Bela 
Bartok's Quartet No. 6 (1937); 
and Mendelssohn's Quartet in D 
major, Opus 44, No. 1. There will 
be a reception in the Hutchinson 
Room of the Bowdoin Senior Cen- 
ter after the concert. 

One of the oldest and most 
highly regarded chamber groups 
in the world, the Curtis Quartet 
has performed annually at Bow- 
doin for over 30 years. Three of 
the original members, violist Max 
Aronoff, cellist Orlando Cole, and 
violinist Jascha Brodsky, are 
members of the present quartet. 
Violinist Yumi Ninomiya recently 
joined the group. 

Founded in 1927, the Quartet 
has won fame throughout Europe 
and America. The group first came 
to Bowdoin through the efforts of 
Sue Winchell Burnett. Mrs. Burn- 
ett, herself a cellist of note, was 
the widow of the late Professor 
Charles T. Burnett, a faculty 
member at Bowdoin for 42 years 
until his death in 1946. Mrs. Burn, 
ett died in 1962. 

In 1954 the quartet was 
awarded the Philadelphia Art Al- 
liance Medal "for distinguished 
contribution to the arts." During 
the summer of 1961 the group 
was the teaching quartet-in-resi- 
dence at the International Insti- 
tute of Music in Puerto Rico. 
During the summers of 1962 and 
1965 they performed the same 
service at Pennsylvania State 
University. 



Support 

Your 

Orient 

Advertisers 




\* 



A x 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7. 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



^ 



There 's 



more 



to it 
than 




PAGE SEVEN 



. .„. Blood, 
sweat, 
and 
tears 



photo by Dave Sperhn* 




photo by. Dave fames 



/ wish I loved the human race; 

I wish I loved its silly face; 
I wish I liked the way it walks; 

I wish I liked the way it talks; 
And when I'm introduced to one 

I wish I thought What jolly Fun! 

... Sir Walter Raleich 




ARGONAUT 
CRAFTS 

Gurnet Bridge 
Brunswick, Maine 

Century old shop at Gurnet 
Bridge's rushing tide. Owners 
live alongside in 1912 boat 
year around. 

Unique oak slab tables seen 
made on premises — Unusual 
gifts — Touch of the nautical 
— Exotic Imports — Maine 
Crafts — Surfboards — Lob- 
ster Traps and Buoys. 

In the 

Heart of 

"Beautiful Downtown Gurnet" 

on Route No. 24 

3 Miles South of Cook's Corner 

10-5 MON. thru SAT. 



"// any pale student, glued to his desk, 
here seek an apology for a way of life whose 
natural fruit is that pallid and emasculate 
scholarship of which New England has had 
too many examples, it will be far better that 
this sketch had not been written. For the 
student there is, in its season, no better place 
than the saddle, and no better companion 
than the rifle or the oar." 

. . . Francis Parkinan, 1868 




To the sound of a different drum 




STAMP COLLECTORS 

If you collect the atampa of ISRAEL, let me <|tiot« you lowest prioea by return mail 
on any you need; no lists or approvals. 

O. T. BLANC 

C larks <'ove. Walpole. Maine 04573 



KENNEBEC FRUIT 

Sunday Papers 

New York Times 

Boston Herald Traveler 

Rampage 



OWEN'S TAXI 

CALL 
725-5000 or 725-5400 

9 Pleasant St., Brunswick 



KINGS BARBER SHOP 

212 MAIN! STIIEiT - MUNSWICK 

RoffUr Sculpture-Kut 
Men's Jtaxor Cut A Hair Styling 



Constantines ' 

212 Maine Street - Brunswick 
Headquarters For KLH Components 



? 



PACE EIGHT 


• 




^BP»1 


bpbbp 






■HB| 




" 1 '■"- -■■■■:: ■■■' ^.'>' : .. B 9 ■ ;..' I .-.; 


MMM|u|&g^b^M^ 




■ 2.E1 


^■^v Jl 


^2 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1969 






* 



<*»##»§ 



i 



JF/**/* Varsity 
Soccer Team 



*%- 



* f T 



photo by Dave Carnei 



STOP ACTION. 

Bates. 



Mark Haley (36) carries the ball into scoring position in last Saturday's action against 



Gridders Take State Series; 
Close Season at Tufts Sat. 



By CHRIS PIERCE 
Orient Sports Writer 

The talented toe of Captain John Delahanty guided 



Bowdoin to a 13-10 victory over 



Polar Bearings 



By ED STEWART 

Orient Sports Writer 

A strong Bates team outran 
Bowdoin, 18-45, in a contest be- 
tween the two last Tuesday. John 
Emerson, a Bates freshman, fi- 
nishing first, broke the Bowdoin 
course record with an 18:18.5 
time for the 3.6 mile course. 

Finishing first among the Bear 
runners was Mark Cuneo, who 
tallied third in the overall stand- 
ings. Following Mark was his 



Pitcher Jim Maloney 



Bates last Saturday and gave the Polar Bears their second consecutive Colby- Bowdoin-Bates 
(CBB) .Championship. Delahanty hit successfully from 34 and J 2 yards, increasing his 
ECAC record set the week before 
with his 15th field goal. 

Both clubs fought through a 
scoreless first quarter last week- 
end with neither side threatening. 
Early in the second period Bow- 
doin drove from her own 41 to the 
Bates 10 where the effort stalled, 
giving Delahanty the opportunity 
to boot his first three-pointer. 
Five minutes later quarterback 
John Benson hit fleet split end 
Paul Wiley with a scoring strike 
of 44 yards. Immediately before 
the touchdown run, the Polar 
Bears had been frustrated when 
Wiley stepped out of bounds en 
route to a 59-yard scoring play. 

Bates came back with seven 
points of her own late in the half 
when a pass interference penalty 
gave them a first down on the 
Bowdoin 24 yard line. Quarter- 
back Steve Boyko, who com- 
pleted 20 passes against the Bow- 
doin secondary, hit Carl Fitz- 
gerald for 23 yards to the one. 
Boyko carried for the touchdown 
three plays later. 

Bates soccer player Andy Morel 
tied the score with 8:39 remaining 
in the third period by kicking a 
23 yard field goal following a 
Bates drive that died on the Bow- 
doin six. Following a fumble of 
the snap from center Bates punt- 
er Peter Rubins covered the ball, 
but Bowdoin had a first down on 
the Bates 21. Mark Haley and 
Bill LoeffJer (ECAC Sophomore 
Player of the Week) carried to 
the Bates five and Delahanty 
came in to boot the winning field 
goal. 

Tomorrow the Bears will try 
to make their mark 4-3 when 
they travel to Medford to play a 
strong Tufts outfit. The Jumbos 
were undefeated until last Sat- 
urday when they were upset by 
Amherst. The Tufts squad boasts 
a good quarterback in Pete Cohen 
and the leading receiver In New 
England, Rich Giachetti. 



Cub Booters Undefeated; 
Maul Unbeaten UNH 6-1 

By WILLIARIl T. BIJSHEY 
Orient Sports Writer 

Scoring five times in the last half, the freshman soccer team 
ran its winning streak to seven and closed out the season unde- 
feated. Three goals by Girma Ashmeron and two by Joe Rosa 
were the difference as the freshmen beat a previously undefeated 
UNH team 6-1. 

Bowdoin took the lead in the 
second period 1-0 as Bill Sexton 
scored his third goal of the sea- 
son. However, UNH managed to 
score before the second half, 
knotting it up, 1-1. After the half, 
Bowdoin netted five goals to break 
the game open as Ashmeron and 
Rosa netted their 18th and 19th 
goals, respectively. Ashmeron, a 
former Ethiopian Olympic player, 
demonstrated his phenominal ball 
control, passing, and shooting be- 
fore a sizeable Bowdoin crowd 
and a dismayed UNH team. 

In line with the rest of their 
season, the defense was tough last 
Saturday, finishing their last 
game with only four goals behind 
them for the entire season. Filling 
in for injured goalie Roger Sel- 
bert, Pete Berons did an excellent 
job making numerous saves and 
directing the defense. 

Over the past season, in addi- 
tion to defeating UNH, the cubs 
mauled North Yarmouth, Maine, 
Hebron, Exeter, Hinckley, and 
Colby. Coach Ray Bicknell re- 
ceived a final tribute from his un- 
defeated team after the UNH 
game when he was caught by an 
unexpected shower created by his 
jubilant squad. 





Football 




Bowdoin 


17 Colby 


14 


Bowdoin 


38 Bate. 


It 


Bowdoin 


11 Williams 
3-3 

It Tuft. Sot. 1:30 


28 


Bowdoin Fr. 


• Bridrton 


34 


Bowdoin Fr. 


3« N. Yarmouth 


36 


Bowdoin Fr. 


< Maino 
V*. Harvard Fri. 

Soccer 


54 


Bowdoin 


1 William. 


* 


Bowdoin 


1 Batta 


a 


Bowdoin 


1 Color 


i 


Bowdoin 


t Maino 


a 


Bowdoin 


1 Bat.. 
3-5-1 
(Mat) 


i 


Bowdoin Fr. 


7 Hinckley 


• 


Bowdoin Fr. 


4 Colby 


• 


Bowdoin Fr. 


1 UNH 

7-« 
(«nal) 


i 


Cross Country 




Bowdoin 


33 William. 


a« 


Bowdoin 


33 Colby 


aa 


Bowdoin 


45 BatM 


IB 


at Vermont Fri. 11:00 




Bowdoin Fr. 


41 Bate. 
M 
(final) 

SsJllng 


It 


Fifth in Now England Conference 






(final) 






Water Polo 




Bowdoin 


1* Northea.tern 


14 



Harriers Downed by Bates; 
Season Ends At UVM 



brother, Ken (ninth), Bob Seek- 
ins (12th), Steve Moriarty 
(13th), and Bob Bassett (14th). 
The Bowdoin frosh finished 
their 0-6 season with a 41-19 loss 

to Bates' junior varsity. Placing 
first for Bowdoin was Steve Mar- 
chand who took a second in the 
meet. Rounding out the frosh 
roster for the past season are Tom 
Mulligan, Rick Buck, Bob Munce, 
Jay Vivian, and Ed Stewart. 



By BRIAN DAVIS 
Orient Sports Writer 

The varsity booters were stale- 
mated last weekend when Maine 
played the Bears to a 1-1 tie. The 
last game of the season, against 
Colby, was originally scheduled 
for the fifth, but due to inunda- 
tion of both campuses by rainfall 
of near-flood conditions, the game 
has been rescheduled for this af- 
ternoon in Waterville. 

Thus far, the Bears stand at 
2-1-2 in state series play, having 
defeated Maine twice, lost one 
and tied another with Bates, and 
tied against Colby. Plagued by in- 
juries, the Bowdoin varsity season 
got off to a slow start with three 
consecutive losses. However, the 
team has been gathering momen- 
tum, even if only enough to tie 
games, over the last part of the 
schedule. 

Last Saturday the varsity soc- 
cer team hosted the Bates Wild- 
cats in their fifth encounter with 
a Maine Series team. After losing 
to Bates in Lewiston, the best the 
Bears could manage in Brunswick 
was a one to one tie. This is the 
second draw of the season for 
Bowdoin as well as the second one 
to one score. The Wildcats scored 
one minute and fifty-two seconds 
into the game when their right 
inside took advantage of crossed 
signals in the Bowdoin defensive 
backfield. Lee Rowe, however, 
evened the score on a penalty 
kick scoring his fifth goal of Bow- 
doin's last five. The two overtime 
periods proved futile for both the 
Bears and the Wildcats. Both 
teams left the field somewhat dis- 
mayed with the 1-1 stalemate. 



"College Baseball on Rise" 



M 

at MIT Sat. 



Polomen Travel 

Bowdoin* undefeated water 
polo team, under the tutelage of 
Coach Charlie Butt travels to 
MIT Saturday for their second, 
and final, match of the fall sea- 
son. 

Two weeks ago the squad out- 
played an aggressive Northeast- 
ern team, 19-14. 



Chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow. 

Sing a song, don't be long 

Thrill me to the marrow. 

Voices of the angels, ring around the moonlight, 

Asking me, said she so free, 

How can you catch the sparrow? 

~ Stephen Stills 



By BILL FINK 

For the Orient 
(Continued from last week) 

He attributed the Red's lack of success in 1969 
(they finished third in the west) to lack of an es- 
tablished pitching rotation, and his own mediocre 
performance (Jim's record this year was 10-6). 
"Though Jim Marritt and Clay Carroll had fairly 
good seasons (15-10 and 18-9, respectively), they 
were the only two pitchers on the staff who re- 
mained in the starting rotation the entire season," 
he pointed out. "A solid, dependable, pitching staff 
is vital to any pennant contender." 

Maloney, himself saw but limited action during 
this past campaign, as he was sidelined through 
April, May, and the first days of June with arm 
trouble which he attributed to throwing too hard 
too soon during the exhibition season. 

The next logical question was what the remedy 
to the situation in the pitching staff might be. He 
said, "If I were Bob Howsam (the Red's general 
manager), I would look along the lines of trading 
Alex Johnson or Bobby Tolan for, say, Gaylord 
Perry of the Giants or Gary Gentry of the Mets. A 
deal like this should be beneficial to any of the clubs 
involved, and thus, would be ideal." 

My final questions for Maloney were directed to- 
ward the subject of baseball in general. First of all, 
I asked for his opinion on the expansionist trend in 
the game over the last few years. Maloney felt that 
this was harmful; "While expansion helps to na- 



tionalize the game by bringing it to more cities and 
fans, it also cheapens its quality. What you end up 
with is many so-so teams rather than a few strong 
ones. 

Concerning the re-legalization of the spitball, Ma- 
loney felt that the pitch should be re-instituted, as 
it presents no more an unfair disadvantage to a 
hitter than a curveball or slider. Finally, I asked 
Big Jim what he thought of the calibre of baseball 
played in Ameri- 
colleges and uni- 
versities. "Col- 
lege baseball," he 
said, "will some- 
day soon replace 
the farm system 
and minor 
leagues. A college 
education has be- 
come important 
to most everyone 
nowadays, and 
that includes ball 
player. You know, 
we can't play for- 
ever. I feel that 
within the next 
ten years you are 
going to find 
practically all of 
your players com- 
ing straight out **•*»«■»«•»*»'••' i*»i 
of college." Jim Maloney 




Joseph Barth Speaks On Sin: It's All In Your Head 



By DOUG SHOWALTER 

Last Sunday evening, Dr. Joseph Barth, who is the 
Director of t&e Ministry of the Uniterian-Universahst 
Association in Boston presented a stimulating lecture 
in which he sought to ascertain tfce relationship be- 
tween "Hippies, Sit-ins, and Religious Faith." 

In an effort to come to terms with this question, Dr. 
Barth, who was being sponsored by the Bowdoin Re- 
ligious Liberals presented a metaphysical-epistemologi- 
cal framework which he felt was basic to understanding 
the religious manifestations of serious Hippie and Sit- 
in movements. Fundamentally, Dr. Barth chose as his 
Weltanschauung a conception of the world in which 
there is a primordial layer of "experiencing" which is 
the source of religious experience. It is from this 
source that we come to realize that in which "we live 
and wove and have our being." Beyond this basic level 
is tile level of man's reflection. This level would in- 
clude man's rational faculties which are responsible 
for the categorical polarization of subject and object 
in man's experience. Dr. Barth felt that this distinc- 
tion between subject and object in man's conceptuali- 
zations prohibits man from realizing the vitality and 
sense of relatedness which are manifested on the pri- 
mary level of "experiencing." Hence, he concluded 
that in a sense, man's reflective nature is capable of 



constructing only an artificial notion of the way things 
are. For, in that all of man's conceptualizations and 
verbalizations are abstracted (by ontological necessity) 
from their "objects," they are evaluated as sinful and 
alienating. The burden of Dr. Bartfti's concern lay in 
his postulation that contemporary man, who is an 
r archetype of rationality has allowed himself to accept 
his conceptual systems (ideas of ideas of ideas . . .) 
as objects of devotion. Dr. Barth felt that these ob- 
jects can only succeed in alienating many from the 
primordial level of "experiencing" — wherein man 
can secure his "authentic existence." He wanted to 
ascribe (though he attempted very little documenta- 
tion) to Hippies and Sit-ins a volition to break through 
the artificial structure of idea systems in order to grasp 
the fundamental ground of "experiencing." Hence, 
one can assume that serious participants in Hippiedom 
and Sit-ins are seeking something quite similar to the 
elusive religious experience. 

Turning briefly from this question Dr. Barth went on 
to consider the nature of drug-taking as it fits into this 
scheme. He concluded generally that the drug-experi- 
ence only induces an isolated, subjective revelatory ex- 
perience. Furthermore, he stated that by being un- 
likely to serve as a vital penetrating force in a man s 
life after the immediate encounter with the drug, the 



drug experience can only be valued as an artificial 
experience — not equivalent to a religious experience. 

In total, the general tendencies which Dr. Barth 
sought to explicate merit the serious consideration of 
all men of our highly mechanized and conceptualized 
age. However, one comes to wonder on a more critical 
plane if conceptualization does indeed equal sinfulness 
and alienation as an ontological fact, whether — by 
implication — there is any valuable and sinless role 
ascribable to man other than that of his seeking to be 
a mere responsive vegetable. Certainly this is an un- 
palatable and seemingly inaccurate rendition of the 
nature of man as I am sure Dr. Barth would agree. 

However, it is my feeling that Dr. Barth, perhaps 
for the ease and effectiveness of presenting a "popular" 
rendition, did not solidly confront the implications of 
his Weltanschauung, nor in the final analysis did he pre- 
sent a coherent or foresighted rendering of this system 
which indeed appears as a caricature (as he himself 
admitted). In fact, one left the lecture with the res- 
ervation that perhaps the serious Hippie and Sit-in 
movements are no more than an over-reaction to an 
extended hypothetical situation in which ideas are 
irresponsibly conjoined to other ideas — themselves 
being ordained as the systematic objects of religious 
devotion. 



THE 




n's reflective na ture is capable oi me auer m t ..■u.. cu . l C ^~» - — u ^ ==^T — =ipw^ -^m T'Wni 

BOWDOIN ORIENT 



4. VOLUME XCIX 



The Oldest Continuously-Publishe d College Weekly in the United States 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK. MAINE. FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 14. 1969 



NUMBER 7 




Can Cat Class Survive 
This Aee Of Obesity? 



The Orchestra Workshop and the Curtis String Quartet Concert this week show the two aspects to be 
emphasized in next year's concert series. Performers will spend time at the College instructing students 
lim^H of arriving for one night stands and leaving immediately. 



Concert Series Revised 



Emphasis Placed On Workshops 



By PETER WILSON 

The College community 



will 



witness in the years ahead — and 
hopefully take an active part in 
— a shift in musical performance 
offerings. The basic change will 
be an attempt to increase live mu- 
sic-making on campus combining 
the efforts of students, faculty 
and community residents, with a 
corresponding de-emphasis on the 
one night guest artist appear- 
ances. Members of Bowdoin's mu- 
sic department feel that this new 
direction has already begun to 
take its course on campus, for ex- 
ample, in the chapel choir and 
glee club successes of last year. 
Prof. Rothlisberger's perfor- 
mances of the Bach cantata, the 
Christmas program, the liturgical 
drama, and the contemporary 
oratorio — each of which featured 
a change in performance locale 
from the concert stage to settings 
more suitable to the scope of the 
music — drew large and enthusi- 
astic audiences. In the area of 
contemporary performance the 
same growing campus participa- 
tion is to be noted. Prof . Schwartz 
of the department mentioned in 
an interview the popularity of 
student-faculty performances of 
contemporary works which have 
this year for the first time been 



formally included as part of the 
concert series. 

After carefully considering 
these expanded interests and the 
limits of the department budget, 
Prof. Robert Beckwith, Chairman 
of the music department, plans to 
actively encourage, organize and 
support live music-making on 
campus by student, faculty and 
community groups. Coaching, in- 
strumental renting, sheet pur- 
chasing and professional assis- 
tance will be employed in this ef- 
fort In lieu of two public profes- 
sional concerts each academic 
year, the department proposes the 
hiring of two or three residential 
artist-groups which^-would spend 
three to six days on campus to 
work intensively with interested 
students and faculty — visiting 
classes, giving demonstrations, 
coaching, playing with student en- 
sembles, offering public work- 
shops and lecture-demonstrations 
and giving concerts. On a small 
basis this approach will be experi- 
mented with this year with visit- 
ing artists Grace Hoffman and 
Joel Kresnick both of whom plan 
to remain on campus for a few 
days following their perform- 
ances. The department has also 
begun negotiations with the Cur- 
tis String Quartet as a possible 



residential group in the future. In 
addition to this proposal plans to 
reconstitute the Bowdoin Orches- 
tral Workshop (under the direc- 
tion of Steven Kecskemethy, con- 
cert master of the Portland Sym- 
phony) and to establish a college- 
community chamber' orchestra 
have already been initiated. 

Professor Beckwith also pointed 
out in an interview that when the 

(Please turn to page 4) 



By JOHN WEISS 

"In the Board of Trustees of 
Bowdoin College, June 13, 1968: 
Voted that effective July 1, 1968, 
the charge to the student ... for 
making up a deficiency in the phy- 
sical education requirement be 
... set at $50.00 per make- 
up, . . ." More than a few Bow- 
doin students will wince when 
they read this quote. Memories of 
eight o'clock neck raisers, early 
morning locker room chills, a few 
missed cal classes, and that $50.00 
additional charge on next semes- 
ter's bill are conjured up. In past 
years many Bowdoin students 
have doubted the schools claim 
that required physical education 
introduces the student to sports 
"with life time value" and to 
"skills that should give him an in- 
terest in physical activity in later 
life." Pushups, situps, basketball, 
volleyball, and weight lifting, the 
activities which composed the core 
of the old program, are sports 
with which the vast majority of 
Bowdoin students are acquainted 
long before they first arrive at 
Brunswick, Maine. With the im- 
plementation of a revised, more 
flexible physical education pro- 
gram this fall, much of this doubt 
and criticism has been eliminated. 
Freshmen arc offered a larger 
choice of Cal electives than in 
previous years. Upper classmen 
may now sign up for sailing, out- 
ing club, tennis, golf, squash, 
hockey lessons, or a variety of 



other activities to fill their Cal re- 
quirement. The program has defi- 
nitely improved. But what dis- 
turbs many students more than 
the failure of past Cal programs 
is that no matter what alterna- 
tives the department offers each 
student is still required to take 
four semesters of Cal, and to pay 
$50 for each semester he fails. 
Also students are wondering what 
IKirtion of the several hundred 
thousand dollar athletic budget is 
alloted to the physical education 
program, and whether this money 
might lie put to better use. 

Mr. Stuckcy, Director of Ath- 
letics at Bowdoin since 1967, of- 
fered an explanation for the con- 
tinuing criticism of the physical 
education program. "Our present 
program is good and flexible. The 
instruction Is much better than 
liefore, due especially to the new 
squash coach who is one of the 
two or three best rackets coaches 
in the world. I think that when 
people criticize us it is often really 
a criticism of our old program 
which admittedly wasn't ade- 
quate." Mr. Stuckey said he would 
like to see the question of the 
elimination of the Cal require- 
ment left open to debate. He did, 
however, state his own opinion on 
this subject. "I think that it's the 
school's responsibility to make 
sure each student at Bowdoin 
knows what facilities are avail- 

( Pleas* turn to page 2) 



More Alumni Support Seen Essential 



By TOM HARVEY 

Since the demise of PDP the question of frater- 
nity survival at Bowdoin has become crucial for 
the fraternities and the College. The Pierce Com- 
mittee recommended "that the College should en- 
courage strong fraternities to remain here at Bow- 
doin." It also recommended, however, that "the 
College establish a periodic physical inspection of 
all fraternity houses and periodically examine the 
economic affairs of each fraternity." The purpose 
of such an examination would be to help or if 
need be to close down any fraternity in serious 
trouble. It is obviously the belief of the Pierce 
Committee and the Administration tliat a large 
number of Bowdoin fraternities will be closing 
their doors soon. The examination committee is, in 
fact, a stream-lined undertaking service for the 
fraternities. Yet before* the Administration begins 
to shovel dirt on top of the fraternities it would 



be wise to consider some alternatives. 

First of all, can the Bowdoin enrollment, under 
the present circumstances, support 11 fraternities? 
According to surveys taken over the past four 
years the expenses of the average Bowdoin frater- 
nity amounts to $16,600. The budget for an ideal 
house may be broken down as follows: 
Utilities: $3,000 
Social: $2,250 

Rushing: $500 (It should be noted that cost 
seems to have little bearing on results in this 
case. The most effective type of rushing 
seems to involve personal contact, a tiling 
which is more expensive in time than in mon- 
ey-) 
Hired Personnel: $2,360 (This assumes that the 
house is using a maid service and that it is 
paying its treasurer and house manager.) 
(Please turn to page 5) 





PAGE TWO 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 14, 1969 




: "THE C-5A cargo transport, it de- 
valapa, will coat at least twice the 
original estimate. Alan Cranston 
it California'a other aenator, a 
scourge ot the military industrial 
complex. The C-SA ia built by 
Lockheed, of Bur bank, Califor- 
nia. Why did Cranaton vote for 
the C-SA? Because, aa ha 
explained, a fleet of theaa 
transports might make possible 
the evacuation M Cor a f>M copy of 
NATIONAL RE- 
I VIEW, writ*! D.pt. 
V, ISO E. 35 Str.ot, 
N. Y. 10016. 



Cal Alternatives Offered This Year 



of American 
troops from 
Europe. 



(Continued from page 1) 

able to him. As an example, it 
would be very unfortunate if 
someone graduated from Bowdoin 
not knowing how to use the li- 
brary facilities. I don't think 
everyone can be introduced to 
what we offer over here if we 
don't have compulsory Cal. I re- 
alize that there is a broad philo- 
sophical problem posed here: Does 



KIDS MATINEE 



"GULLIVER TRAVELS 
TO THE MOON" 



PARKVIEW CLEANERS 

212 MAINE STREET 

"On the Hill" 

WASH & DRY & 24 HOUR SHIRT SERVICE 
FREE ALTERATIONS 



the College have the right to tell 
the student to do anything?" Mr. 
Stuckey v^as asked approximately 
what percentage of the athletic 
budget was necessary to run tbo 
present physical education pro- 
gram; also, if Cal were no longer 
compulsory, would the athletic 
department save much money? 
"Most erf our budget goes to travel 
expenses, equipment, mainte- 
nance, and personnel. I can see no 
reduction in personnel under any 
circumstances. We have nine 
coaches, but they are only involved 
in Cal in a minor way. If Cal was 
abolished we'd only save on rack- 
ets, gear, and other minor things. 



KENNEBEC FRUIT 

Sunday Papers 

New York Times 

Boston Herald Traveler 

Rampage 



HOLIDAY PIZZA 

CORNER OF UNION & CEDAR STS., BRUNSWICK 

(Next to the Giant Store) 

PHONE 725-2521 




Friday and Saturday — 12 Noon to Midnight 
Sunday to Thursday — 4 P.M. to Midnight 

DEUCIOUS PIZZA • HOT OVEN GRINDERS 
• ITALIAN SANDWICHES 

DINE IN OR TAKE OUT 
Our Dough Is Made Fresh Daily! 



$m&~ 



Tel. 725-5382 
Open Friday Until 9 p.m. 



SALE 

One Of Our Most 
Famous Name 

RAINCOATS 

Yea WM smmsrflf h; Recognise These Se Fomees 
Raincoats Ives Teoeah Their 
Labefc Had Te ie Removed 

SOLD NATIONALLY AT 37.50-42.50-45.00 



FIORELLO 
A Musical Biography 

PICKARD THEATER 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE 



Friday, Saturday, Sunday 
November 21, 22, 23 at 8:15 P.M. 



Tickets $2.00 or 
Student or Faculty I.D. Card 



For Reservations 
Call 725-8731 Ext. 375 



. . . We'd still present a program 
to any interested students and I 
think there would be enough in- 
terested students to warrant con- 
tinuing the program. In case Cal 
were made optional we might of- 
fer courses for credit." 

Mr. Sabasteanski, Director of 
the Cal program, was also inter- 
viewed. When asked why a fine 
was imposed on students who 
failed Cal, he replied, "I'd like to- 
point out that it's a fine for re- 
taking Cal and not a fine for fail- 
ing it." Mr. Sabasteanski was 
subsequently asked why the fee 
was raised from $25 to $50 in 
1968. "The fee was made original- 
ly as a deterrent to failing, but 
$25 was no deterrent. Another 
thing was ttf^put the fee more in 
line with an academic course; 
they cost $250." Mr. Sabasteanski 
went on further to say, "I don't 
advocate the dropping of the Cal 
requirement. But I do think Cal 
for credit should be given serious 
consideration. There is a great 
deal of interest, especially among 
future teachers, to get a back, 
ground in coaching or adminis- 
trative techniques of physical edu- 

(Please turn to page S) 



MOULTON UNION BOOKSTORE 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

HALF-PRICE 

This Is The Time To Buy 
While We Have A Fine Selection 




ARGONAUT 
CRAFTS 

Gurnet Bridge 
Brunswick, Maine 

Century old shop at Gurnet 
Bridge'* rushing tide. Owners 
live alongside in 1912 boat 
year around. 

Unique oak slab tables seen 
made on premises — Unusual 
gifts — Touch of the nautical 
— Exotic Imports — Maine 
Crafts — Surfboards — Lob- 
ster Traps and Buoys. 

In the 

Heart of 

"Beautiful Downtown Gurnet" 

on Route No. 24 

3 Miles South of Cook's Corner 

10-6 MON. thru SAT. 



24 



99 



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PARMIGIANO con SALZA 



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OCIELO! 

QUE BUONO PRANZO E 
CON UNO PREZZO ! 

Namely, our 

Veal Cutlet Parmessn 

with Tomato Sauce. 

A great dinner, still 
only $3.65 with 
translation included. 

There's more to 
Valle's than just 

terrific steaks snd 

great lobster. 

VALLE'S. mia bella! 



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STEAK HOUSES 



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PORTLAND: 1140 Brighton Art. 
Ttl. 774-4551 



KITTERY l Inlt ratal* 15 
T*l. 4M-0010 



*-• 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14. 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Horses in Art 




PAGTTHREE 



Motion Since Movies 



By STEVE RUSTARI 

As a very informal and very 
uninformed student of art I feel 
limited to review the lecture, "Mo- 
tion in Art," presented by Gordon 
Hendricks on 6 November, last 
Thursday evening, at 8:15 p.m. in 
Smith Auditorium. But since Mr. 
Hendricks' lecture was limited, 
perhaps the occasion and the re- 
viewer are happily matched. I say 
that the lecture was limited be- 
cause according to the invitation 
sent out by the Art Associates 
Program, Mr. Hendricks' spon- 
sor, and according to the speaker's 
own opening remarks, the lecture 
would trace "the effects of the 
invention of the motion picture 
on painters' concepts of speed and 
motion." After about twenty min- 
utes, however, the audience 
learned that the actual topic was 
the portrayal of horses in paint- 
ing and sculpture before and af- 
ter the invention of motion pic- 
tures. That topic is, granted, a 
specific aspect of the larger theme 
indicated, but it hardly warrants 
the eighty-minute presentation it 
underwent. 

Mr. Hendricks' saving grace as 
a lecturer was his wry sense of 
humor, which made his extensive 
horse survey seem somewhat 
shorter. The first part of the lec- 
ture was an amusing, anecdotal 
treatment of the life of the mo- 
tion picture's father, Eadweard 
Muybridge. As Muybridge's se- 
date portrait, complete with gray 
beard, mustachios, and " three- 
piece suit, was projected on the 
screen, his rather hectic career 
was presented. Indeed, a man who 
came to America in search -of 
gold, who travelled extensively in 
Alaska, Texas, Yosemite Park, 
and Guatemala for exotic photo- 
graphs, and who shot an officer 
named Larkins for. having an af- 
fair with his wife Flora and fo'r 
causing the dubious parentage of 
"little Harry" hardly seems se- 
date. Muybridge, upon being com- 
missioned by California's Govern- 
or Stanford to win a wager that 
all four feet of his trotter were 
simultaneously off the ground, 
made a famous series of photo- 
graphs of the racehorse Occident. 
After his trek through South 
America, Muybridge was rehired 
by Stanford, who was pleased 
with the photographer's work, to 
take more horse pictures, result- 
ing in the first motion picture 
show in America. That was in 
1879, seven years after Muy- 
bridge's perfection of instantane- 
ous photography, which Hen- 
dricks claimed "dealt the death- 
blow for realistic painting." 

Throughout his presentation of 
numerous paintings of horses in 
motion — trotters, walkers, rear- 
ers, and striding gallopers (in 
"the rocking horse position") — 
Hendricks stressed that painters 
incorrectly depicted a horse's feet, 
which are raised diagonally in a 
trot and on the same side in a 
walk. Deftly applying his humor, 
and drawing the loudest applause 
of the evening, Hendricks said, as 
"Flight into Egypt," showing 
Mary and Jesus on a "jackass, if 
you prefer," was cast upon the 
screen, "If indeed this donkey 
were walking this way, there 
would be no Christianity now." 
Even after the invention of mo- 
tion pictures, painters continued 
to misrepresent horses in motion. 
In "May Morning in the Park," 
Thomas Eakins (about whom 
Hendricks, who has also written 
The Edison Myth, The History of 
tho Blograph, and The Klnetl- 
scope, is writing a biography) 
"perversely" shows one walking 
horse teamed with three trotters 
— a physical impossibility. Hen- 
dricks said Eakins should have 
known better, because he had 
seen Muybridge's motion pictures. 
Hendricks suspects that the wom- 
an and her relatives in "May 
Morning" are in light, while her 
husband and his relatives are in 



shadow, because she, and not her 
wealthy husband paid five hun- 
dred dollars for the painting; I 
suspect that one horse is walking 
because Eakins received only five 
hundred dollars. 

Near the end of this talk Hen- 
dricks admitted that he was high- 
ly limited in his selection of paint- 
ings. He strayed from his subject 
by including human nudes — too 
many of Eakins' male subjects 
and too few female subjects, 
namely one reclining woman and 
the highly abstract "Nude De- 
scending a Staircase." He showed 
the incorrect depiction of horses 
in motion in Etrurian painting, 
Byzantine sculpture, and the Tro- 
jan column, but he did not show 
Michelangelo's amazingly correct 
depiction in his studies for the 
Trivulzio and Sforza monuments, 
and also for the "Battle of An- 
ghiari." In fact, Michelangelo was 
as exhaustive in observation as 
the nineteenth-century painter 
who, Hendricks did mention, had 
a horse canter and rear until it 
was ruined by exhaustion. Hen- 
dricks' attempts at guessing Muy- 
bridge's effect on painters work- 
ing after the introduction of mo- 
tion pictures, such as Degas, is 
mere conjecture, for how is such 
an influence to be determined, un- 
less a painter leaves his finger- 
prints on a photographer's work, 
as Francis Bacon (of the modern 
age) did on Eakins'? My conten- 
tion is that Muybridge's photo- 
graphs had little effect on paint- 
ing, for before his work painters 
conventionally depicted horses as 
they thought horses were, and af- 
ter his work painters such as the 
futurists, who set out to "extol 
aggressive movement" and to 
"capture the beauty of speed," . 
impressionistically depict horses 
as they think horses should be. 
In both cases a horse is seldom 
presented true-to-life. After all. 
art is not so much a question of 
scientific guess-work as it is of 
aesthetic appreciation. With re- 
spect to Mr. Hendricks, however. 
I quote T. S. Eliot: 

'Pure' artistic appreciation is In 
my thinking only an ideal, when 
not merely a figment, and must be, 
so long as the appreciation of art 
is an affair of limited and transient 
human being/existing in space and 
time. Both artist and audience are 
limited. There is for each time, for 
each artist, a kind of alloy required 
to make the metal workable into 
art, and each generation prefers its 
own alloy to any other. Hence each 
new master of criticism performs 
a useful service merely by the fad 
that his errors are of a different 
kind from the last; and the longer 
the sequence of critics we liave, the 
greater amount of turret lion pos- 
sible. 



Student Was 
Stabbed On 
Sunday 



Jonathan S'. Younger of Bruns- 
wick has been charged with as- 
sault with a deadly weapon in 
connection with the stabbing of 
James Lavery, 71 early Sunday 
morning. Lavery, who was treated 
for a stab wound in the left arm, 
reported to police that he had run 
down the stairs of his Maine 
Street apartment to investigate 
what scunded like screams when 
he was confronted by a man. La- 
very said the man stabbed him af- 
ter a brief exchange of words. 

William R. Gordon, of Maine 
Street, administered first-aid to 
Lavery and summoned the police. 

One hour after the incident, 
William R. Medary, radio dis- 
patch clerk at the Municipal 
Building, noted a man at the po- 
lice station fitting the description 
given by Lavery. 

Medary alerted officer Domi- 
nique Vermette who placed 
Younger under arrest and charged 
him with assault with a deadly 
weapon. 

Lavery, who majors in history 
and is a halfback on tho football 
team, was treated by Dr. John B. 
Anderson and released Sunday. 



Far Letters To The Editor, Write 
EDITOR. THE ORIENT 

Moult on I'liioii, Campus 



Students Seen Fawns - 
Of Gommie Conspiracy 



WASHINGTON — (CPS) — The 
chairman of the House Committee 
on Internal Security has charged 
that the New Mobilization Commit- 
tee is 'dominated by Communists," 
and that the Vietnam Moratorium 
Committee is "part of a propagan- 
da maneuver designed and orga- 
nized by Communists and other 
revolutionaries." 

Rep. Richard Ichord (D-Mo.) 
said it is not surprising that 
"Americans have backed away 
from the November demonstrations 
of New Mobe" since, "90 percent 
of the revolutioning Marxists in 
this nation" participated in the Oct. 
15 Moratorium. 

His committee, which used to be 
called the House Un-American Ac- 
tivities Committee (HUAC) has re- 
leased a "staff study' on the so- 
called fall peace offensive: Satur- 
day's March on Washington, spon- 
sored by New Mobe, the strikes 
for peace Nov. 13 and 14 organized 
by the Student Mobilization Com- 
mittee, and locally-instigated Mora- 
torium activities. 

The study says Student Mobe is 
controlled by the Young Socialists 
Alliance, which is the front organi- 
zation for the Socialist Workers 
Party, which is the front organiza- 
tion for the Trotskyite Communist 
Party in the U. S. ( which has' been 
proven to be subversive. 

Although many of the Moratori- 
um leaders ar <" "sincerely moti- 
vated," the study says, they have 



Council Disscuses Mixer ' 
Approves Meal For Biafra 



By JEFF 1)1(1 MMOM) 
A fast for Biafra was the first 
order of business in the Student 
Council Meeting. Steve Mclntirc 
moved that the Council form a 
committee to organize, on the 
Thursday after Thanksgiving, a 
voluntary, limited fast with col- 
lection boxes placed around the 
school. 

There were two prevailing 
opinions in the debate. Although 
Mclntire had made clear in the 
introduction to his motion that al- 
most all relief money goes to hu- 
manitarian aid ($4,428,000 to doc- 
tors and medical supplies; $199,- 
000 to housing and orphanages; 
two million seeds, 3,000 tons of 
food), the argument was still 
raised that sending money could 
only prolong the war. This politi- 
cal argument was faced with the 
humanitarian argument of send- 
ing food to starving people. As 
George Isaacson explained, in al- 
most every civil war (excluding, 
of course, Korea and Vietnam, 
among others) the United States 
refrained from entering the poli- 
tical argument and has sent only 
food and medical supplies. This 



humanitarian stand is supported 
by the Red Cross and the United 
Nations, as well as the Geneva 
Convention. The Convention spe- 
cifically stales that the Red Cross 
shall be permitted to breach bar- 
ricades to bring humanitarian aid: 
interestingly, all of the major 
world powers have ■ lx»cn silent 
about the Rod Cross DC7 which 
was shot down by a Nigerian 
M'IG. The motion was finally 
passed 22-2, with one abstention. 
Glenn Kaplan discussed the 
progress of tho investigation into 
Council-s|>on.sored mixers. He has 
made tentative arrangements for 
one on December 6, the Saturday 
after Thanksgiving week. As 
plans unfold, there appears to ho 
a reception from 4:00 to 7:30 in 
the old gym; tho basketball game; 
and the dance itself until mid- 
night. The cost f>or girl will be 
$5-fi; per man, it. will be from one 
to two dollars, The girls will stay 
in fraternities which offer to 
evacuate their men, and would 
return the next day. The only dif- 
fiVii'ly wold l>o the eost: npprnx- 
imate'y $500 would Ik? needed, 
(Please turn to page 5) 



Questions Asked uL iJai Department 



(Continued from page 2) 

cation." Mr. Sabasteanski also 
liked the idea that Bowdoin stu- 
dents are exposed to organized 
sports programs through Cal. 
"Why there are people on our 
sports teams who wouldn't even 
be allowed to try out at some 
other schools." 

The discussions of the abolition 
of the Cal requirement haven't all 
been informal. In the last student 
council meeting of the 1968-69 
school year Jim Sterling made a 
motion that the student council 
initiate a movement to eliminate 
the Cal requirement. Subsequent- 
ly this idea was brought before 
the Student Faculty Committee 
on Athletics headed by Dean 
Greason. Dean Greason stated 



that the committee had met sev- 
eral times this year and meets 
again this Monday night, Novem- 
ber 17. He suggested that the ba- 
sic problem with abolishing the 
present requirement is that, "If 
it's abolished, how can we effec- 
tively introduce freshmen to the 
potential of the College and the 
reKion?" 

Several of the problems posed 
at the beginning of this article 
were answered by Mr. Stuckey 
and Mr. Sabasteanski. Tho New 
Cal program does offer interest- 
ing and exciting alternatives to 
the student. A relatively insig- 
nificant portion of the athletic 
budget would be re-allocated if 
Cal were made optional. The $50 
fine is not at all a -fine, but a fee 
for the privilege of repeating a 



required Cal course. The fee was I 
increased because "$25 is no de- 
terrent." and, as the bursar, Mr. 
Libby. stated, "Even deterrents 
are affected by inflation." The es- 
sential' "philosophical" question 
remains unanswered: Does the 
school have the right to make a 
student take any course. The Col- 
lege seems to nave partially an- 
swered this question when they 
dropped the science requirement. 
Many Bowdoin students are be- 
ginning to feel that the choice of 
participating or not participating 
in any College program should be 
left to the student. As one Bow- 
doin professor commented, "If a 
19 or 20 year old potential draftee 
wants to get fat by sitting on his 
ass it's his business. Let him get 
fat." 



unfortunately become "intimately 
allied with a distinctive pro-Com- 
munist program and leadership." 

The study calls Dave Dellinger, 
co-chairman of the New Mobe, a 
"self-styled non-Soviet Communist." 
Two news organizations present at 
New Mobe planning sessions, Lib- 
eration News Service and the Na- 
tional Guardian, are referred to as 
wommunist organs, proving New 
Mobe's domination by Communist 
types. 

The pattern of the fall peace of- 
fensive "is not one of legitimate, 
sincere protest against presumed 
inadequacies in our Vietnam poli- 
cies," according to the study. 
"Rather, it is one of blatant Com- 
munist manipulation, exploitation 
and subversion. . . . 

"In the words of the Communist 
Party's west coast newspaper, the 
People's World, 'The Moratorium 
is being viewed, not as the climax 
or high point but the opposing shot 
of the fall offensive against the 
war.' The usage may have been 
inadvertent but it is nonetheless 
apt; the fall offensive is indeed a 
shot — a shot at the heart of 
America during a time of crisis. 

"Let those who continue to par- 
ticipate in the fall offensive do so 
with no illusions. No matter what 
their intentions, the result will 
only be aid to the cause of the 
Communists in Moscow, Peking 
and Hanoi — and their adherents 
and agents here at home," the 
study concludes. 



Weslyan 
Reforms 
Boards 



Middltown, Conn. — (LP.) — 
Wesleyan University's Board of 
Trustees recently voted a sweep- 
ing reorganization of the Board 
and u major restructuring of the 
administration aimed at creating a 
better balanced and more realistic 
system of campus governance. 
Major features of the plan in- 
clude: 

1. Addition of students and 
faculty as voting members of the 
five standing Board committees 
where most policy is formulated; 

2. Creation of the offices of 
Chancellor, nominated by faculty 
and students, and Executive Vice 
President, each to share adminis- 
trativc responsibilities with the 
President; 

3. Enlargement and diversifica- 
tion of the Board to include re- 
cent graduates, non-alumni and 
women (five non-alumni were 
named at the time of this an- 
nouncement including two wom- 
en and two black trustees); 

4. Enabling seniors to be nomi- 
nated and to vote in alumni trus- 
tee elections; 

5. Enlargement of the Board 



(from 26 to 29) through a system 
which assures the election of at 
least three recent graduates as 
t rustees. 

The new Wesleyan program 
preserves the integrity of estab- 
lished University relationships, 
but is cited by the trustees as "a 
significant step" toward the ulti- 
mate form of University govern- 
ance: "a blend of students, facul- 
ty, administration and trustees 
rather than a linkage of essential- 
ly separate bodies." 



A U.S. Civil Service rep- 
resentative will be at the 
Senior Center to disease 
"Federal Career Opportu- 
nities" on November 20, 
1969 11 :00 &.m.-3:00 pan. 

The National Security 
Agency will be Interview- 
ing at the Placement 
reau on November SO. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1969 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Bust Cal 



Volume XCIX 



Friday, November 14, 1969 



Number 7 



Beatles Regress In Album 

By MICHAEL JACKSON 

College Press Service 

"GET BACK." Beatles' newest album produced by Apple Records. 

-r- (Regression: the reversal to a pattern of behavior more appro- 
priate to, or characteristic of, an earlier stage of development.) 

"Concept: Music, Philosophy and Politics" magazine describes the 
Beatles* "Get Back" as "a model of simplicity," and that it is, for the 
dominant theme of this, the Beatles' newest set, is one of regression. 

The set consists of ah album, a studio -session photo book and an ac- 
companying film of the recording session, all slated to be released in 
a package deal this December. The album itself contains 11 cuts, all 
recorded live in the new Apple studios at 3 Seville Blvd., London. The 
cover photo shows the Beatles posed on the steps of EMI studios, ex- 
actly as they appeared on the cover of their first album, "Please Please 
Me," in 1963. 

In this album there is no background orchestration, no electronic 
effects, no Eastern influence and even no overdubbing. Only the. 
Beatles and keyboard man Billy Preston are involved. 

All of the cuts were composed and arranged before the Beatles went 
to the studio, so the result is very loose; looser, in fact, than "The 
Beatles." Listening to this album is like being in the control room of 
Apple's studios during a rehearsal. Nothing has been edited out or 
dubbed in, and many times the Beatles stop in the middle of one song 
and go to the next. 

On occasion John Lennon may be heard discussing the merits of each 
song with producer George Martin, and the many breaks during and 
in between songs are filled with mini jams and warm-up sessions; the 
format of the album is hot unlike a Kafka stream-of-consciousness 
novel. 

The first cut, "One after 909," was composed by Lennon-McCartney 
in 1959 when the group was still known as the Quarrymen. The lyrics 
and deceptively simple rhythm of this song are not unlike "Take Out 
Some Insurance on Me,Baby," another 10-year-old work, but the gui- 
tar work, around which everything else centers, is definitely post- 
"Abby Road," giving the song a ubiquitous retrogression-proaction 
dichotomy. 

To Lennon's cry of, "Do your own thing men," "Don't Let Me Down" 
begins. The tone of this version is definitely apart from that of the 45; 
one can sense the spontaneous cohesion — almost a desperate plea for 
release — that engulfs. The Leslie amplification process on the lead 
guitar gives that instrument the versatility of an organ, and the re- 
sultant crying sound is used extensively to offset Lennon's plea. 

In "You Can Even Take a Pony," Lennon implies that each member 
of the Beatles is disjoining himself from the others, anu the group it- 
self from its followers (from now on "you can celebrate anything you 
want/you can penetrate any place you go."). "Ive Got a Feeling" is 
McCartney's statement that he is going to stop being manipulated by 
outsiders. 

The title song, "Get Back," summarizes their feelings about their 
followers: McCartney tells Jo- Jo (i.e. John Lennon) to get back to 
where you once belonged." 

"Jo-Jo was a man who thought he was a loner, but he was another 
man," reaffirms the Beatles' decision to assert their individuality. 
Jo-Jo was, in fact, reputed to be a loner, and now this label is appli- 
cable to all four. 

The theme of leaving their world of prominence that they have 
occupied for the last six years and going "home" appears again and 
again. In Harrison's "For You Blue," and Lennon-McCartney's "Two 
of Us on Our Way Home," the disenchantment with living a world- 
known ideal appears. 

Paul's "Let It Be" and "The Long and Winding Road" set is prob- 
ably the most classically dramatic of the album. The former is a "hey 
Jude" type of thing, deriding sex, religion, and fanaticism. The same 
type of feel as that employed in "Happiness Is A Warm Gun" is in- 
corporated here. 
* "The Long and Winding Road" is simply a depressing statement, not 
unlike "Julia" ("half of what I say is meaningless, but I say it just 
to reach you"). McCartney describes a love-hate relationship, and 
places this squarely on the heads of their fans. Paul states that it is 
useless to give himself to another (i.e., us) when the very act of giv- 
ing negates all that he is. He begs to be released ("please don't keep 
me waiting here/take me down the long and winding road" back 
home). 

The last segment of the recording is a "Get Back" mini-encore, and 
is extremely discontinuous with the rest of the recording. Its tone is 
one of sarcastic laughter and derision, but the guitar work is not retro- 
gressive, rather it is hard and modern, similar to Jimi Hendrix's 
"Voodoo Child," (slight return). 

Is the derision for us, for themselves? 

There is something absolutely revolutionary about this album, out- 
side of its new format. This is its presentation; it is no longer the 
Beatles that are performing, it is four individuals communicating to 
themselves. This is what they've been leading up to for the past six 
years — they are now alone with themselves. 

The previous 16 albums were presentations of emotion, finished 
products that we reacted to. This album is concerned with stimulus, 
rather than with response, with act, rather than with re-act. The 
listener is forced to live what they are setting forth in order to de- 
duce the result. 

One thing concerning this album is definite: the regression towards 
"home" in "Get Back" marks an ending. The Beatles are finished, 
"Get Back" has taken them "home." They realize that the only way 
to produce "stimulus" material again is to not function as a group, 
but as individuals. They must not produce finished material, but con- 
tinue, if they will, in the same manner as "Get Back." 

THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 
Member of the United States Student Press Association 

THB BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

A. P. Daggett, J. P. Granger. Alan Kolod. Rred Langerman. 

Published weekly wnsn el— a w an held during the Fall and Spring Semester by the 
students of Bowdoin College Address editorial communication* to tb* Editor sad 
business and subscription communication* to the Ba in — ■ Manager at the) ORIENT, 
■toultoo Union. Bowdoin College. Brunswick, Me. ©4011. Represented for national 
sdrertising- by the Waftnisl Educational Advertising Ssrvies. Inc. Second eUas postage 
paid as Braaswiek.aU. •4011 las aakserlprlaa fake la ft*a (I) dollars for oaa year. 



J 

We feel that the College's present physical edu- 
cation requirement is farcical. It is an expression 
of an educational philosophy that was already ar- 
chaic in the nineteenth century. Whatever purpose 
physical education classes might serve is defeated 
completely by the total lack of enthusiasm com- 
mon to both students and instructors. Little ex- 
ercise and less instruction has become the rule 
rather than the exception. The time has come to 
question not only the role but the continued exis- 
tence of any physical education requirement at 
Bowdoin. 

Next week, two petitions will be circulated. The 
first, for those still involved with the requirement 
will read "If two hundred other people sign this 
petition, I agree to boycott physical education in 
its present form during the Spring, 1970 Semes- 
ter." The second will read simply, "I am opposed 
to the present physical education requirement." 
We welcome any and all support. 

Marc Blessoff '71 
Matt Hunter '72 
Paul Craven '72 

Afro-Am Explained 

One can prove or make an issue out of any 
statement, if that statement is taken out of con- 
text. On November 7, the Bowdoin Orient ran an 
article that covered the Keylor Committee meeting 
of which I was a participant. Ordinarily one can 
overlook such irresponsibility, but when the prin- 
ciples of other individuals are affected, then the 
act warrants a rebuttal. Specifically I am talking 
about the statement made about the membership 
of the Afro-American Society. The Orient editor, 
Fred Cusick, made a point of using my statements 
in such a way as to make the society look dis- 
criminatory. If he had really been alert he would 
have remembered that I also made the statement 
that the Society, as the name implies, was basic- 
ally for Afro-American students at Bowdoin. 

I feel that it is the responsibility of a college 
newspaper to make sure that all articles are accu- 
rate. We are all aware that commercial news- 
papers thrive on sensationalism and controversy, 
but a college newspaper, financed by the students 
should be able to find more cogent matters to 
print. For instance, if the newspaper was really 
interested in What the Afro-American Society was 
doing it could have approached me and simply 
asked. I would have been pleased to expound on 
how many brothers have been active this semester 
working in the Brunswick community, in churches 
and schools trying to dispel many of the myths 
that plague both Black and white. There are other 
projects that the society is working on now and 
will be working on in the future. Moreover one 
visible manifestation of our activism is the Afro- 
American Center. Many hours were spent in get- 
ting this whole program together and still there 
is a lot more work to do. 

Our policy over the past year and a half has 
been to keep our meeting open to who ever would 
like to attend. During the present semester sev- 
eral white students have attended the meetings of 
the society to find the brotherhood very receptive. 
In addition personal invitations have been ex- 
tended to the Deans to attend at anytime. At this 
point in our history on campus I feel that we have 
more than proven our sincerity through our efforts 
to bring this white community closer to the prob- 
lems in the urban centers. One has only to look 
back on last spring's Black Arts Festival to under- 



stand the depth of our committment to the white 
community at Bowdoin. 

Finally by printing a contrived statement that 
is wholly inaccurate Mr. Cusick undermines the 
goals and integrity of the society. Upon reading 
the Orient one would readily conclude, especially 
if one is new to the campus, that the Afro-Amer- 
ican Society is segregationist. On the contrary 
we feel that it is imperative that Black college 
students prepare themselves to address the grave 
wrongs that exist in our society. It is to this end 
that the Afro-American Society launches its pro- 
grams; the trivial matter of integration is of no 
importance. If upon leaving college we can affect 
some change, whereby we enrich, at least one 
Black child's life, then our present means will be 
legitimized. What I am trying to say is said more 
eloquently in two sentences by Brother Eldridge 
Cleaver: "We shall have our manhood. We shall 
have it or the earth will be leveled by our attempts 
to gain it." 

Robert C. Johnson, Jr. 

(Editor's Note: 

We thank Mr. Johnson for his informative 
statement on the aims and functions of Afro-Am. 
Our article was not intended to be a critique of 
Afro-Am; it was, rather, a report on what trans- 
pired at the meeting of the Keylor Committee. We 
believe that it was completely accurate in its ac- 
count of what was' said at the meeting.) 

Record Set Straight - 

To the Editor: 

I would like to correct two of the more glaring 
factual errors contained in your treatment of the 
orientation problem at Zeta Psi. First of all, I was 
not chairman of Zeta Psi's 1969 Orientation Com- 
mittee (nor did I serve in any capacity on that com- 
mittee, "which was chaired by Bother John McPhil- 
lips). Secondly, no representatives of Zeta Psi frat- 
ernity were brought before the Student Judiciary 
Board at any time to answer charges of orienta- 
tion violations. I would suggest that in the near fu- 
ture the Orient make a more conscientous attempt 
to secure the facts before writing an article. 

Sincerely, 
PETER MULCAHY 

Nixon Responds? 

Sir: 

I enclose a letter received from the White House 
in response to the letter signed by many members 
of the Bowdoin faculty and administration regard- 
ing Mr. Nixon's statement that he would "not be 
affected" by the October 15th Moratorium. This 
letter will be of interest to those who read the Bow- 
doin letter in the Orient and also to those faculty 
members who signed the communication to Mr. 
Nixon. 

Yours sincereljfF 
HERBERT R. COURSEN, JR. 

Dear Mr. Coursen : 

On President Nixon's behalf, I want to acknowl- 
edge your letter and to assure you that your com- 
ments have been carefully noted. 

In view of the concern you express, the enclosed 
exchange of correspondence between the President 
and Mr. Randy J. Dicks will undoubtedly be of in- 
terest to you. 

Sincerely, 

NOBLE M. MELENCAMP 

Staff Assistant 

to the President 



Newman Club Discusses Ethical Change 



By JOE COVES 

"The only permanent factor in 
life is change," said John Cardinal 
Newman scarcely one hundred 
years ago. As wc approach the 
end of 1969, each minute is 
plucked from our existence and 
we are placed in a different situ- 
ation, in a different time, demand- 
ing of us a totally different per- 
spective on the problems we face. 
Weekly Fr. John Connor of the 
Bangor Theological Seminary has 
discussed recent developments 
and outlooks on Christian thought 
in the Chase Barn Chamber un- 
der the sponsorship of the Bow- 
doin Newman Apostolate. 

Fr. Connors' discussion cen- 
tered around the importance of 
personal conscience in deciding 
moral questions. Fr. Connor felt 
the need for birth control was a 
necessary good in the face eco- 
nomic and mental hardships 
placed on the Christian family. 
Several married women in the 
group agreed with Fr. Connor but 
could not understand why con- 
traception was still condemned by 
the Church. These questions led 
to an analysis of the basic rift in 
Catholic theology today — the 
crisis in authority. 

The Church, as Fr. Connor dis- 



cussed it, is undergoing a period 
of transition in evaluating her po- 
sition in a modern world. Torn be- 
tween the needs of her people and 
the tradition with which she has 
been associated for nearly nine 
hundred years, the Church will 
necessarily be slow in meeting the 
demands of the twentieth century. 

Vatican II succeeded in realiz- 
ing the need to reform leadership 
in the Church and to return to the 
circular concept of authority, 
which, as Fr. Connor pointed out, 
could be the necessary means of 
hastening the Church's ability to 
meet the demands of the modern 
world. 

The problem of change not only 
pervades the structure of the 
Church but the problems of de- 
fining the situations she attempts 
to treat. Fr. Connor in the last of 
his discussions opened the meet- 
ing with the intention of defining 
the "Just War." After some dis- 
cussion practically everyone 
agreed that at the present mo- 
ment there could be no definition 
made, yet the circumstances sur- 
rounding this decision were obvi- 
ously urging the illegalization of 
war. So. where does this leave our 
system of moral values? Perhaps 
to the generations of scholars we 



are fostering today in the midst 
of our queries. In any event, we 
must offer our thanks to men like 
Fr. Connor who care enough to 
challenge our sense of destiny. 

Concert Series 

(Continued from page 1) 
formal concert series was inau- 
gurated several years ago a vir- 
tual musical vacuum existed in the 
surrounding community. Present- 
ly, however, a strong Portland 
Symphony Orchestra series and 
Portland community concert se- 
ries offer opportunities for the 
area listener to hear first rate 
professional performers and per- 
formances. Artists like Good- 
man, Itzhak, Perlman, Hoolander, 
Van Cliburn, Watts and Farrell 
have been contracted by Portland 
management for public appear- 
ances. Bowdoin simply cannot 
compete with these names. With 
this in mind, the department feels 
an obligation — while preserving 
the standard literature and con- 
tinuing presentations of very old 
and very new music — to 
strenghten the live music-making 
participation on campus in terms 
of student-faculty needs and 
growing interests. 



FRIDAY. NOVEMbER 14, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE FIVE 




The mural under progress in the Franklin Pierce Reading Room on 
the second floor of the Hawthorne-Longfellow Library is the work of 
Mr. Howard Warshaw who will be teaching art courses at Bowdoin 
for the fall semester during Mr. Cornell's absence. Mr. Warshaw comes 
to Bowdoin from the University of California where he has taught 
since 1955 and where he first met Mr. Cornell, who came to study un- 
der him. Previous to 1955 Mr. Warshaw taught at the Jepson Art In- 
stitute and the State University of Iowa. 

Mr. Warshaw's career in art has included not only widespread 
teaching but also exhibitions in the Metropolitan and Guggenhein Mu- 
seums, the Musee D'Art Modern in Paris and articles relating to his 
paintings in publications such as The Nation and Art Forum. Mr. War- 
shaw was educated at the Art Students League in New York and 
studied extensively the works of Rico Lebrun, whom he considers a 
major influence on his own art. 

Mr. Warshaw's'mural at Bowdoin shows the influence of the North- 
ern Renaissance on his painting. The central figures of the mural are 
variations on the themes seen in Tintoretto's despositions. 



Concert Well Attended 



By HERBERT LOVETT 

The size of the audience at last 
Monday evenings concert was 
surprising but is was explicable 
partially because the Curtis 
String Quartet are established lo- 
cal favorites, having performed 
here annually since 1933 and par- 
tially because Music 1 (which re- 
quires attendance at, at least 4 
concerts) has an exceptionally 
large enrollment this semester. 
At any rate, the audience size" was 
the only surprise of the evening. 

For the Haydn C major, the 
Quartet performed characteristi- 
cally: at best, "solidly"; at worst, 
just plain stodgily. The perfor- 
mance was not terribly brilliant 
and the viola had a rather discon- 
certing tendency to miss notes in 
the attack. 

Before the Bartok Sixth, Cell- 
ist, Orlando Cole gave the basic 
apology for the modern work. 
In the context, however, the de- 
scription made the piece sound 
much more unapproachable than 
it actually is. It is hard to imagine 
that Bartok still requires au- 
dience preparation. 

The Bartok is an excellent 
work; but, unfortunately, the per- 
formance was somewhat less so. 
There were times when the Quar- 
tet achieved clarity but many of 
the passages were muddy and illy 
executed. The situation with the 



Mendelssohn was the reverse. The 
work itself is almost . campy 
(especially in the finale which in- 
cessantly repeats the same 
theme) but the performance was 
somewhat better than the Bar- 
tok. Still, their approach was 
foursquare and labored when 
what was needed was a lighter 
touch. 

The need for such concerts 
alone has been diminished by the 
ever improving concert calendar 
in Portland. As a result, the pro- 
gramming beginning with some 
of this year and the next will 
largely consist of a number of so- 
loists who will be on campus for 
a few days to give recitals, to con- 
duct master classes and to be 
available for seminars and dis- 
cussions. 

THE CURTIS STRING 

QUARTET 

Jascha Brodsky, violin 

Yumi Ninomiya, violin 

Max Aronoff, viola 

Orlando Cole, cello 

Quartet in C Major, Opus 54, No. 2 

Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809) 

Quartet No. 6 (1937) - 

Bela Bartok (1881-1945) 
Quartet in D Major, Opus 44, No. 
1 

Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) 
PICKARD THEATER 

8:15 P.M. 
NOVEMBER 10, 1969 



Schwartz Wins 
ASCAP Award 

The American Society of Compos- 
ers, Authors and Publishers 
(ASCAP) announces, today that 
Prof. Elliott S. Schwartz has won 
one of its 1969-70 awards. It was 
Professor Schwartz's fourth ASCAP 
prize. 

Granted by an independent pan- 
el, the awards are designed to pro- 
vide financial encouragement to 
new composers and authors on the 
contemporary scene and to pay 
recognition to those established 
writers whose compositions are a 
significant part of the nation's 
musical heritage. 

Among other writers and com- 
posers receiving awards this year 
are Gian Carlo Menotti, Virgil 
Thomson, W. H. Auden, Judy Col- 
lins, Phil Ochs, James Rado, 
Gerome Ragni and Sherman Ed- 
wards. Rado and Ragni wrote the 
musical "Hair" and Edwards 
wrote the Tony Award-winning 
musical "1776." 

A recent commissioned compo- 
sition by Professor Schwartz, 
"Music for Prince Albert, on his 
150th Birthday," was performed in 
October at the Composers Theatre 
in New York. Recently performed 
at New York's Town Hall was his 
composition "Aria No. 1." "Con- 
cert Piece for Ten Players," an- 
other Schwartz composition, will be 
performed by the New Cantata 
Orchestra of London Nov. 20 in 
Wigmore Hall, London. 

Professor Schwartz has been a 
member of the Bowdoin faculty 
since 1964 and holds A.B., A.M., 
and Ed.D. degrees from Columbia 
University. Last summer, the 
award-winning, composer conducted 
research in England and The Neth- 
erlands under a Faculty Research 
Stipend from a Ford Foundation 
Humanities'* Grant to Bowdoin. 

Biafra Meal 

(Continued from page 3) 

and none of the student organi- 
zations which Kaplan talked to 
would be willing to foot the bill 
for any loss. Of course, as he 
pointed out, simple mathematics 
at an all-male school would seem 
to confine that loss to a minimum, 
but the Council still tabled the 
motion to figure how to absorb a 
potential loss. 

Junior class elections were an- 
nounced: petitions, which will be 
distributed all this week at the 
information desk, must be in to 
the desk or the Council by Mon- 
day night. The elections will be 
held Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday of next week. Bruce 
Bragdon, Aleck Turner, and Chris 
Almy were named to the Commit- 
tee on Governance; Augie Miller 
and Steve Fulchino to the com- 
mittee on summer use of Pickard 
Theater. The final announcement 
was that the SCATE Committee 
would be handing out question- 
naires soon. 



Fraternities Feel Financial Pinch 



(Continued from page 1) 
Maintenance: $2,500 (Expenses in this area may 

be carried over into the next fiscal year.) 
Rent: $6,000 (This covers the mortgage, insur- 
ance and some cf the maintenance costs paid 
by the house through its house corporation.) 
Alumni Contact: $300 (Christmas cards, news- 
letters, and appeals for support.) 
The total ideal budget comes to $16,900. Assum- 
ing that 70% of 750 freshmen, sophomores, and 
juniors were fraternity members the income of 
each house would be as follows: 

Room rent: (26 members) $12,324 

House dues: (48 members) $ 5,280 



Total income: $17,604 

(Note: This budget assumes that there are 16 
members in each class and that the house 
can hold 26. All but three houses can meet 
this requirement. They could pass the budget 
requirements if they received strong support 
from their alumni.) 



As to whether the food problem would effect a 
fraternity's survival the former Director of Bow- 
doin's Dining Service has stated that "With a 
good chef and steward ... I believe a fraternity 
could operate an excellent dining room with 45 
men." 

The College depends upon fraternities to feed 
and shelter a large portion of the student body. 
The figures above show that fraternities can sur- 
vive only if the college takes certain measures. 
It should up a quota system of 48 men maximum, 
excluding seniors. This would distibute the num- 
ber of fraternity men more fairly. The current 
inflated quota of 26 freshmen only serves to per- 
petuate a system in which some fraternities starve 
while others are glutted with members. 

One final word of caution: the proposed system 
will cnly work for the 11 fraternities so long as 
the percentage of fraternity men remains constant. 
In the light of this year's rushing figures and the 
forecast tor next year it would be foolish to be too 
optimistic over the fate of fraternities at Bowdoin. 



At Haverford 

Curriculum Revamped; 
Requirements Dropped 

Haverford, Pa. — (LP.) — Haverford College recently announced a 
series of major changes in its academic program, all effective imme- 
diately. The changes emphasize the results of the educational process 
and reduce the traditional rigid structure in that process. 

Haverford adopted a set of guidelines which define the broad goals 
of a liberal education. 



It established a new written-and-oral examination which must be 
taken by every sophomore to determine how well he is progressing to- 
ward those goals. 

It started a series of seminars for freshmen, with the student's semi- 
nar instructor usually becoming his freshman academic adviser. 

It reduced the number of courses required in a student's first two 
years; and it eliminated the traditional requirement that a student dis- 
tribute his studies through a prescribed number of courses in each of 
the college's three academic divisions. 

The only such requirement left is for one year of a foreign language. 

GUIDELINES: The guidelines for a liberal education describe four 
areas of learning: written and oral communication; foreign language; 
mathematics; and humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. 

The new catalog explains, "The purpose of these guidelines is to help 
the student in planning a course of study at Haverford." The catalog 
cites "a consensus concerning the general shape of a liberal educa- 
tion." The guidelines outline that general shape. 

EXAMINATION: The new examination is called the "sophomore 
inquiry," and it is required of all students in the spring of their sopho- 
more year. The inquiry assesses the student's progress in three major 
areas of knowledge: humanities, social sciences and natural sciences. 
It is designed to determine whether the student has grasped the basic 
concepts of each of those three areas. 

The first full sophomore inquiry will be held in the spring of 1971. 
Each student wilt receive a written evaluation of his performance from 
the examining committee. If the student's performance is unsatisfac- 
tory, the examiners will give specific recommendations about how he 
is to make up the deficiency. Later he will be required to take part or 
all of the inquiry again. 

The specific form of the inquiry is still being planned, but some 
ideas under consideration include inviting select upper classmen to 
participate in the oral inquiry and setting clear standards of passing 
and failing, possibly with no other gradations. Also under consideration 
is using outside examiners to help design and administer thcvinquiry. 
While creating the new guidelines, Haverford also eliminated some 1 of 
the more rigid structure traditional in the educational process. 

COURSE LOAD: Until this year, students were required to have 
taken 36 courses to be graduated: five courses per semester for the 
first two years, and four courses per semester for the last two years. 
Starting this year, only 32 courses were required for incoming stu- 
dents: four courses per semester each year. 

This change represents an effort to give students a better chance to 
adjust to college and to provide an opportunity for the concentration, 
reflection and experimentation that differentiates higher academic 
work from that which most students have known in secondary school. 

While the norm is four courses per semester, a student still can take 
five courses if he wishes; and with permission, he can take less than 
four. 

COURSE DISTRIBUTION: Under the traditional course-distribu- 
tion requirements, -Haverford students were required to take at least 
two, one-semester courses in each of the college's thiee academic di- 
visions: humanities, natural sciences and social sciences. 

In addition, they were required to complete two years' study in a 
foreign language. Now, because of the sophomore inquiry the distri- 
bution requirements have been eliminated completely; however a one- 
year language requirement remains. 

College officials felt the combination of guidelines, effective advising 
and interested students would produce better results than a rigid set 
of course requirements. 

Elimination of the course-distribution requirement, they felt, would 
allow the student and his adviser to tailor an academic program more 
closely suited to each individual student's needs. 

LANGUAGE: In line with elimination of the distribution require- 
ment, Haverford's foreign language requirement was cut in half. Pre- 
viously, students had to complete two years' study in a foreign langu- 
age. Now only one year is required, but the need for continuing langu- 
age study is stressed by the inclusion of language prerequisites for other 
courses. 

Some courses in non-language subjects prescribe readings in foreign 
languages for which the student needs more than the required one-year 
language ability. A history course, for example, "Topics in Modern 
European History," is listed in the current catalog as having a pre- 
requisite reading knowledge of French. 

MAJOR CONCENTRATION: The College affirms the responsibility 
of each and every department to make the work in the major field as 
fully consummatory as possible for the senior. There is need, in the 
senior year especially, to challenge the student's powers of analysis 
and synthesis and to foster the creative use of the knowledge and 
skills that he has acquired in his previous studies. 

The new catalog continues : "There is also the need to evaluate the 
performance of the senior in the field of his major, not only to safe- 
guard the academic standards of the College but to help the student 
discover where he stands at this moment in his career. In short syn- 
thesis and evaluation in some form are both essential. 

"While upholding these educational objectives, the College recog- 
nizes that they may be achieved by various means, such as (1) the 100 
course, at the end of which the student takes a comprehensive examina- 
tion, (2) a thesis or advanced project paper, (3) a course or courses 
specially designed or designated, or (4) some combination of these or 
other means. 

"Each department, therefore, in its statement of major requirements 
specifies the particular mode of synthesis and form of evaluation that 
it has adopted for the senior year. 

"Examinations in courses in the major subject taken in the last se- 
mester of the senior year may be omitted at the discretion of the ma- 
jor supervisor." 



*v 






PAGE SIX 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1969 



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ROTC Names Top Cadets 




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Eight senior ROTC cadets were 
designated Distinguished Military 
Students Monday in ceremonies 
which also included presentation 
of six Academic Achievement 
Wreaths for scholastic excellence 
in Military Science courses. Also 
awarded were 1969 ROTC Sum- 
mer Camp Honor Company 
Awards, and Ribbons for partici- 
pation in the ROTC Rangers and 
the ROTC rifle team. 

Lt. Col. Ralph B. Osgood, Jr., 
head of ROTC, presided at the 
exercises. DMS designates are se- 
niors who have maintained high 
scholastic standings and ROTC 
status and have demonstrated 
leadership ability. Cadets who 
have remained in the top 10 per- 
cent of their Military Science 
classes are awarded Wreaths. 
Summer Camp Awards are pre- 
sented to those cadets who were 
members of the best company In 



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their respective ROTC summer 
camp battalions. 

The eight DMS award winners 
are: 

Cadet Capt. Richard H. Card, 
Cadet Maj. G. Christopher Crigh- 
ton, Cadet Capt. John D. Dela- 
hanty, Cadet Capt. John F. Erk- 
kinen, Cadet Maj. Alfred J. Jessel, 
Cadet Capt. Stephen B. Lang, Ca- 
det Lt. Col. Wayne C. Sanford, 
Cadet Capt. Dale H. Tomlinson. 

Receiving wreaths were: 

Cadet Lt. Col. Sanford and Ca- 
det Maj. Crlghton, both for the 
third time; Cadet Pit. Sgt. Wil- 
liam M. Menning 71, and Cadet 
S. Sgt. Stephen S. Carey 71, both 
for the second time; and Cadet 
Cpl. William A. Burroughs 72, 
and Cadet Duane R. Taylor 72, 
both for 'the first time. 

Receiving Summer Camp 
Awards were: 

Cadet 1st Lt. Richard D. Barr 
70, Cadet 2nd Lt. James H. Burr 
70, Cadet Pit. Sgt. David J. Cor- 
coran 70, Cadet 1st Lt. Henry P. 
Day, Jr. 70, Cadet 1st Sgt. Ber- 
nard J. Kubetz 70, Cadet 2nd Lt. 
Frederick R. Pekrul, Jr. 70, and 
Cadet Capt. Tomlinson. 

Receiving Ribbons for partici- 
pation in the Rangers were: 

Cadet Maj. Crighton; Cadet 1st 
Lt. Day; Cadet 2nd Lt. Bruce C. 
Dow 70, Cadet Dale B. Flora 72, 
Cadet Pit. Sgt. Steven H. Plourde 
70, Cadet Pit. Sgt. Menning; and 
Cadet Taylor. 

Receiving 'Ribbons for partici- 
pation in the ROTC rifle team 
were: 

Cadet Russell G. Dabrowski 72, 
Cadet Flora; and Cadet Taylor. 



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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 



— 



The new college band 



" Avant Garde of Intermission Intellectuality" 



By MARTIN FRIEDLANDER 

Orient Sports Editor 

(Ed. Note: the bulk of Information for this article was 

derived from an article appearing: In the November 9, 

1969 edition of The New York Times.) 

For a change, they didn't mention Bowdoin. Lauding 
the "brassy and brisk" American college halftime band, 
The New York Times proceeded to keep up with the times 
by introducing the lastest format in halftime entertain- 
ment; "In the Ivy League in recent years, traditional 
routines have been abandoned for a much more sophisti- 
cated entertainment — essentially satiric, in style a par- 
ody of the precision-proud quasimilitary bands, in sub- 
stance a social comment on politics, sex, and other campus 
concerns. These bands are the avant-garde of intermis- 
sion intellectuality." From the incompleteness of the ar- 
ticle, one must only assume that Bowdoin's antics are 
either out of line with the 'intellectual avant-garde,' or 
merely not of a status warranting similar press recogni- 
tion. Both are dubious conclusions. 

It is interesting to note, that while the antics at the 
Ivies are amusing, they are more rigidly controlled than 
those of Bowdoin, and at times even censored. The Times 
notes, "These scripts are devised, and the routines 
worked out, by student groups. There is, inescapably, a 
veto power over material exercised by school authorities, 
and the most persistent battle is against over-explicit 
sexual terms and other impolite expressions." It seems 
that the Columbia band's rendition of an abstract sexual 
act (merger of symbols for the male and female) is ac- 
ceptable to 'the authorities,' but one of its birth control 
scripts was confiscated by the athletic director of Dart- 
mouth a couple of years ago. Bowdoin similarly ran a 
script, uncensored about coeducation earlier this year, 
and performed a most elaborate series of acts which must 
amount to the most liberal interpretation of the coedu- 
cational experience ever seen on Whittier Field. 

However, the Ivies do devote their efforts in devising 
scripts which do deviate from the deviate. Columbia, in 
addition to its phallic symbols, marches with an authen- 
tic Australian Aborigine Didgeteedoo (a hollow log, two 
note super kazoo), the world's largest triangle, and the 
"only E-flat double-reed contrabass marching Sarrusa- 
. phone in Civilization." 

Modern themes seem to prevail for script material. 



While Bowdoin's antics pretty much gravitate about lo- 
cal issues (like coeducation, a new president, etc.), other 
cago, Mayor Daley, and the Pentagon. The themes of a 
schools deal with such all-time college favorites as Chi- 
Harvard show dealing with the Democratic Convention 
were "Beat the Press" and "Mace the Nation." "Oink" 
was derived from a "Dick" formation, while the music 
heard was "Chicago." At this year's Brown game, Yale 
dealt with troop withdrawal from Vietnam by having two 
of its 100 band members "withdraw" — and promptly 
return. Back in the pre-election days of 1968, the Yale 
band commented on the "creeping communism" issue 
prevailing in the campaign — they played the Marche 
Slav while marching in a creeping formation. 



Upton Sinclair would have been pleased had he been in 
the crowd at the Princeton-Columbia game this year 
when the Princeton band centered its script on. the meat- 
packing industry. It read; "(the meat-packers) have been 
putting chicken in hot dogs to make them cheap. And 
speaking of meatpacking, the band observes that Wall 
Street secretaries have been shaking the foundations of 
the financial district by shunning the traditional bras- 
siere. By provoking a rising interest rate, this practice 
has understandingly contributed to a bear market ..." 
etc.). With the advent of girls at Bowdoin, maybe one 
will see the "understandable contribution" to a Polar Bear 
market. In any case, one can safely assume girls will cer- 
tainly increase the interest rate. 





c 



id 



Seasonal 



Review 



99 



photo by D»T« 9p«rll»« 



Setting the Record Straight 



Football 



Soccer 



Varsity 
Frosh 



Cross Country 



Varsity 
Frosh 



3-4 
I* 


Varsity 4-5-2 
Frosh 7-0 


y 

1-5 
1-5 


Sailing 

Fifth in New England Conf. 


Water 


Polo . , 



1-1 




PAGE EIGHT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1969 




I photo by Dave Sperling 

THE ARMS OF THE LAW . . . belong* to the ref on the football field. 

Hoop Rule Clinic Here: 
Shooting Season Starts 

The Western Maine Board of Approved Basketball Ollicials will hold 
its annual compulsory interpretation meeting here Sunday (Nov. 16). 
The meeting will begin at 1 p.m. in the Morrell Gymnasium. 

Bowdoin varsity basketball coach Ray S. Bicknell said a clinic with 
slides and players will be held to 



demonstrate rules interpretation. 
Conducting the clinic will be Nor- 
man VanArmsdale of Princeton, 
N.J., Chairman of the Executive 
Committee of the International 
Association of Approved Basket- 
ball Officials. He has been an ac- 
tive official in college work and is 
generally considered the top offi- 
cial in the Ivy League. 

Following the clinic, the ap- 
proximately 150 participating of- 
ficials will dine in the College's 
Moulton Union. A business meet- 
ing ' will be held in the Colbath 
Room of the Morrell- Gymnasium 
after dinner. Presiding will be 
Michael DiRenzo of Auburn, Me., 
President of the Western Maine 
Board of Approved Basketball Of- 

ficialsr 

Shooters Aim at Norwich 

The varsity rifle team will be 
looking for its first victory of the 
current season when it plays host 
to Norwich University Saturday 
(Nov. 15). 

The Polar Bear riflemen, 
coached by M/Sgt. John P. Breen 
of the Bowdoin ROTC staff, lost 
its first two matches — to Maine 
an Nasson. 



Polar Bearings 



Bowdoin 
Bowdoin Fr 



Bowdoin 



Bowdoin 



Bowdoin 



Football 

17 Tufts 

3-4 
13 Harvard 

.1-5 

Soccer 

2 Colby. 

4-5-2 

Cross Country 

46 Vermont 

1-5 

Water Polo 

5 MIT 

i-i 



35 
14 



If 



15 



Shooting Schedule 

Norwich H 

Dartmouth A 

Nasson H 

Norwich A 

Nasson A 

Dartmouth II 



No*. 
Nov. 
Dm. 
Jan. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



15 
22 
6 
10 
14 
21 



Bears OverpowS 




Despite Benson 9 s 325 yds 



By CHRIS PIERCE 
Orient Sporta Writer 

Quarterback Peter Cohen hurled three scoring 
passes in the first half to ignite Tufts to an ex- 
plosive 35-17 win over the Polar Bears last Sat- 
urday at the Frederick Ellis Oval. Cohen com- 
pleted 16 of 22 passes in the first half for 246 
yards as the Jumbos amassed a 21-3 lead and put 
the game out of reach early in the third period 
when fleet soph halfback Pope returned Bowdoin's 
second half kickoff for a 95 yard touchdown run. 
Delahanty Opens Scoring 

The Polar Bears held their only lead of the day 
when Captain John Delahanty closed out a bril- 
liant end-kicking season with his 15th career field 
goal, a 26 yard shot that gave Bowdoin a short 
lived 3-0 lead midway through the first period. 
However, Tufts bounced back almost immediately, 
when Cdhen hit Pope with a 25 yard scoring aerial, 
his fifth straight completion on a drive that cov- 
ered 73 yards. Tufts upped the score to 14-3 at 
the end of the period when Pete Pascuicco hauled 
in another Cohen bomb for 55 yards and the 
touchdown. A few minutes later Pascuicco again 
scored on a pass from Cohen, this time taking a 
pass standing in the end zone when Cohen was 
forced to scramble. 

Benton Throw* 325 Yards 

After Pope's fancy kickoff return to open the 
second half, Bowdoin moved the ball consistently 



well. Quarterback John Benson had his best day 
ever statistically as he completed 25 of 40 passes 
for 325 yards and two touchdowns. Early in the 
fourth period Benson alternated between sopho- 
more Cliff Webster and junior Paul Wiley on a 
scoring drive of 82 yards, finally hitting Webster 
with a ten yarder for the touchdown. Following a 
Tufts score on an 11 yard run by Peter Watson, 
Benson started another aerial drive, this one also 
culminating in a ten yard payoff pitch to Webster. 
Directions of Polar Bearing's 

... Statistics were quite deceiving in the Tufts 
game — Bowdoin outgained the Jumbos, 468 to 
380, but Tufts controlled the game. ... A good 
deaHof the Bear yardage came in the fourth per- 
iod when Benson completed 14 passes for 175 
yards. . . . Cliff Webster caught ten passes for 
117 yards and two touchdowns as he filled a spot 
left by injured Mike Denoncour. . . . Paul Wiley 
grabbed 11 for 184 yards including one of 59 
yards with which he almost went all the way. 
The Final Tally 

The Polar Bears ended up 3-4 in Coach Lentz's 
second season, an improvement over last year's 
final tally of 2-5. . . . With the interior offensive 
line of Gordon Sewall, Burt Richardson, Tom 
Carey, Al Cappellini, and Ray Linnell back for 
the third consecutive year next fall, prospects are 
bright. Only four seniors started this year. . . . 
If injuries are held down early next season, pros- 
pects might prove even brighter. 



Pre-Season Hockey Play Starts As 
Icemen Meet Salem State Tonight 

By JOHN BARRY and others 
For the Orient 

Once again, Bowdoin College promises to thrill the fans with their magic on the ice, as an- 
other hockey season gets underway in New England. As in years past, they will be led by a strong 
defense and a potent scoring threat. 



Captains Steve and Earl Hardy 
will lead the hard hitting squad. 
Although graduation took four 
players from last year's division 
champion team, the return of 11 
lettermen and a strong soph class 
lends an air of strong optimism 
for at least equalling last year's 
output. 

Pre-season activity begins with 
a scrimmage against Salem State 
tonight. Thifj^Ulbe followed by 
a two ^ame sSIB^ainst Provi- 
dence College nexnBkursday and 
Friday. The followlm Wednes- 
day, the highlight wilj|be a match 
against Boston University, a per- 
ennial Eastern power. 

VARSITY HOCKEY 

Dec. 

6 Hamilton A 8:00 

lOffiBoslon Stale A 8:30 

13 Army H 7:30 
17. 18. 19 2nd Annual Cleveland Cup 

Tumey at Cleveland 
Jan. 

10 Connecticut H 7:30 

13 Colby A 7:30 

16 Vermont II 7:30 

17 Williams H 4:00 
20 Northeastern H 7:30 
Feb. 

6 Massachusetts A 7:00 

7 Amherst A 2:00 

M Merrimack /L 8:00 

13 Middlcbury H 4:00 




*■ photo by Dave Sperling 

SOME OF THE BOYS IN THE BAND . . . blow their horns. 



Wherein lies bear precision? 

Marching Band Goes Undefeated 



As The Winter 

Comes Upon 

Us, We 

Need 

more sports writers: 
hockey 
basketball 
indoor track 
swimming 
riflery 

■•ip III 
contact: Martin Friedlander 
Ext. 300 or 9-944! 



By BRIAN DAVIS 
Orient Sports Writer 

Why is the Bowdoin Precision Marching 
Band? The blame can be most appropriately 
placed on the shoulders of nineteen "musi- 
cians" and Professor Rothlisberger. The ac- 
tual director of the band is Bernie Kubetz. 
Bernie's interest in music is a carry-over 
from his high school band days. At Bowdoin. 
the Tailgaters, a Dixieland Band, was orga- 
nized during Bernie's Freshman year and 
so he continued his musical calling. However, 
the B. P. M. Band, then a thirty-piece unit, 
caught Bernie's interest and he attempted to 
change the band from a laughed-at organi- 
zation to an organization that intentionally 
spread joy and merriment throughout the 
stands at Bowdoin games. 

To assist him, Bernie has help from man- 



ager Augie Miller who is in charge of music, 
money, and uniforms; assistant manager Bob 
Stewart who will automatically be next 
year's manager; and his roommates George 
Isaacson and Rich Mbrely. 

Since George announces the games, the 
creation of the half time commentary is 
made much easier. The formations them- 
selves are invented by Bernie, but practiced 
by. the entire band every Wednesday. Prac- 
ticed? Well, at least rehearsed. The major 
concern in the formations is that everyone 
scrambles properly and eventually everyone 
is stationed in the correct place. An inter- 
esting note is that through the efforts of 
Bernie Kubetz. the band was awarded cal 
credits for the practice sessions. 

The man, however, who is responsible for 
making people laugh at what the band is do- 



ing and not how they are doing it, is Pro- 
fessor Rothlisberger. Although Bernie picks 
the music, Professor Rothlisberger makes 
certain that it sounds as it should. He re- 
hearses the band twice a week. As one band 
member said, ''He is the first band advisor to 
do more than sign for bills and it has been a 
lot more." 

The Bowdoin Precision Marching Band 
does not take itself seriously and yet it is 
.still a raging success. Coaches have praised 
tbf or everything from drawing spirit at home 
contests to being spirit when they travel to 
away games. This is a long way to come for 
a band that was to be replaced by a rented 
unit two or three years ago. With the hock- 
ey and basketball seasons still ahead, the 
B. P. M. B. is far from calling it quits for 
the year — even if the fans wish they would. 



THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 



VOLUME XC1X 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK. MAINE, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 21, 1969 



NUMBER 8 



Capitol March Ends 
In Violent Protest 

By JAY SWEET 

On Thursday, November 1 3, every Howard Johnson's on the New Jersey Turnpike was 
gently occupied by the armies of the young. They came in VW's and denim, like a column of ants 
engulfing everything in its path. The men who run Howard Johnson's and their normal New Jer- 
sey clientele were taken very much aback. They were at first furious, then bewildered and final- 
ly entertained, for the great weapon of the gentle army is good theatre. Solemn, self-conscious 
warriors of flute and harmonica and their soft women-children in God's own living bra, march- 
ing on the American eagle, watching it happen once again through eyes wide and cynical. And 
remembering the experience, the sustained erotic surge of bringing all that good theatre right 
down on a little chunk of Uncle Sam's celluloid, and feeling it bend, and maybe break? . . . Like 
it did once up in the hills of New York. So the caravan was moving again, gypsies and gangsters, 
down to D.C., down to see the Man. Howard Johnson was rolling with the punch. 



Fiorello Will Provide 
An Amusing Evening 



I went in to get a cup of affee. 
The man behin the count r was 
middle aged and black. 
"Going down to D.C.?" 
"Yes" 

"Peace March?" 
"Yes" 

"Good luck to you." 
He refused to let me pay for my 
coffee. He was on our side, the 
first defector I met. 
II 
The churches of Washington 
had been opened to the New Mo- 
bilization as staging, feeding, and 
housing centers. Busses were 
chartered to take demonstrators 
to Arlington National Cemetery 
so that they could march six 
miles back to Washington and pa- 
rade past the White House. Each 
marcher paused for a moment in 
front of the White House to call 
out the name of a person killed 
in Vietnam. Security forces had 
set up huge arc lamps in front of 
the White House, and it was im- 
possible to see past them. It was 
later claimed that Richard Nixon 
was in the White House during 
the demonstration. No one seems 
to know whether he could either 
see it or hear it. 

I arrived at the Metropolitan 
African Methodist Episcopal 
Church just in time to miss a bus. 
It was the middle of the Wash- 
ington rush hour and the transit 
workers were on strike. It was 
drizzling and hailing, about thirty 
degrees with a gusty wind. The 
New Mobe transportation Mar- 
shals had no idea when the next 
bus would come. 

Inside the church, about 300 
people were milling around eating 
cheese sandwiches and drinking 
coffee. Busses from all parts of 
the country were unloading pas- 
sengers and then driving away to 
parts unknown. The New Mobe 
people were trying to get as many 
people as possible into the second 
floor of the church, where they 
could wait for the busses. Period- 
ically announcements were made 
regarding the busses, generally 
that they were on their way. 

At one point, a member of the 
Yippies got up and began to re- 
cruit people for a march on the 
South Vietnamese embassy. Sev- 
eral groups had announced plans 
to occupy that building by any 
means necessary. A New Mobe 
marshal cut the speaker off, say- 
ing, "anyone who participates in 
that march, which is not sanc- 
tioned by the New Mobe, is just 
going to fuck up the system." I 
began to wonder about the New 
Mobe. 

Later, a little girl ran up one of 
the aisles knocking the reserved 
(Please turn to page 5) 




Radical Lawyer Talks 
Of Military Injustice 

By JEFF DRUMMOND 
Kent Spriggs is a radical; what's more, he is a radical philanthro- 
pist; and what's more, he is a radical philanthropist lawyer. He gradu- 
ated from Bowdoin in 1961 after he was expelled from the College for 
much of his last semester. A Government major, he went to NYU Law 
School and then joined the Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO). 
He is now Assistant to the Director of OEO Legal Services in Missis- 
sippi. 



By FRED CUSICK and 
PETER WILSON 

Fiorello H. LaGuardia, the real 
Fiorello H. LaGuardia, was an am- 
bitious, often ruthless New York 
politician. As a congressman he 
helped to create the hysteria that 
got this country into World War 
I. After the war he capitalized 
on his combat record by waving 
the "bloody shirt" at every 
speech and rally. Somewhere in 
the banal musical which bears his 
name he is characterized as "a 
man who hates tyranny and in- 
justice of any type." His hatred 
of tyranny and injustice, how- 
ever, didn't prevent him from 
sacrificing Bertrand Russell to 
the voting bigots of New York 
in the CCNY case of 1940. Con- 
trary to legend LaGuardia did 
not destroy Tammany. Judge 
Seabury did that. LaGuardia, 
who won only because the Demo- 
crats were divided between two 
candidates, reaped the benefits of 
Seabury's work. The difference 
between the "Little Flower" and 
his Tammany opponents was that 
he was an honest demagogue. 

Musicals, like the people who 
write them and the people who 
review them, for that matter, are 
not concerned with what is true 
but only with what is superficially 
true. This Friday, Saturday, and 
Sunday evenings a very super- 
ficial, schmaltzy, and cornball 
musical version of the life of La- 
Guardia will be presented at the 
Pickard Theater. 

Fiorello is one of those mu- 
sicals that has everything neces- 
sary for success on Broadway: a 
New York hero, pretty girls, Jew- 
ish humor, and a paper thin plot. 
As the musical opens Fiorello is 
a politically ambitious, but warm- 
hearted lawyer in pre-World War 
I New York. He plays coronet 
for the Ancient Order of Hiber- 
nians, fights for striking women 
workers, and convinces an entire 
smoke-filled room of poker-faced 
politicians that he is the man to 
run for Congress. He is elected 
to Congress with the help of his 
love-sick secretary and two assis- 



tants. In Congress Fiorello fights 
for a draft law against those who 
think that we shouldn't send the 
boys "Over There." Of course 
Fiorello too must enlist, and fight, 
to prove that he's not a hypocrite 
and come back an air ace covered 
with glory. We next see him ten 
years later as a candidate for 
mayor against Jimmie Walker. 
He is married, although not to his 
still love-sick secretary. He man- 
ages to lose the election, his wife, 
and his" cool in the space of five 
minutes. Fiorello is not defeated. 
He vows to continue his fight 
against Tammany. Three years 
later (roughly eight minutes 
stage time) Fiorello is again run- 
ning for mayor, thanks to the 
good judge Seabury, and he has 
a new wife (The secretary fi- 
nally caught him). The musical 
ends on that happy note. 

The Pickard Theater produc- 
tion under the direction of Jed 
Burke and Professor Rodney 
Rothlisberger is extremely good 
considering the time and person- 
nel problems that have afflicted 
it. Jed Burke is to be congratu- 
lated for his imaginative use of 
both the stage and the audience 
area. Professor Rothlisberger 
triumphs over a rather thin mu- 
sical score to produce a well bal- 
anced and restrained perfor- 
mance. Individual musicanship, 
particularly the imagination of 
Hilliard Goldfarb at the piano, 
is uniformly excellent. 

With the exception of two 
songs, "Politics .and Poker" and 
"Working on the Side of the 
Angels," the score is hideous. 
Tunes like "I Love a Cop," "Twi- 
light Descends," and Marie's un- 
f orgetable swansong belie the re- 
port that this musical won a Pul- 
itzer prize. 

Tom Peckenham plays the title 
role with great energy. His per- 
formance is a caricature of La- 
Guardia. He rushes about doing 
good deeds with incredible speed 
but little sensitivity. The "Little 
Flower" was a more interesting 
man than the overgrown boy 

(Please turn to page 4) 



He was talking mostly, he said, 
to those thinking of entering law. 
Since "law is the Man's game," 
he cautioned all those who were 
radical and liberal that being a 
lawyer is a down; Because the 
law is a "reflection of the domi- 
nant views" of those who have 
most economic power, there are 
incredible contradictions in the 
phrase "radical lawyer:" to be in 
law, one has to "play in the Man's 
ballpark." 

After taking a hand count of 
of the "radicals, liberals, centers, 
and right-of-centers," Spriggs 
continued to define the role of 
law in the United States. The 
highest role for a lawyer to play 
is that of protecting the leaders 
of the "Movement." whether that 
movement be Civil Rights, GI or- 
ganization, welfare reform, or 
whatever. The second role is to 
search for the fissures and cracks 
in the American legal system 
which permit the Movement to 
gain any slight advantage pos- 
sible. If he can do neither of these, 
Spriggs believes, a lawyer de- 
serves to work in corporation law. 

He made one more point about 
( Plea se turn to page 1) 



Afro-Am Study Requires Moral Context 



By PROF. REGINALD LEWIS 

(Editor's note: Professor Lewis Is chairman of a com- 
mittee charged with setting up a program of Afro-Ameri- 
can studies at Bowdoin. The following is his explanation 
of the motives and methods necessary for such a pro- 
gram.) 

Bowdoin's commitment to establish an under- 
graduate major in Afro-American Studies is not 
only timely and needful but pregnant with enrich- 
ing intellectual and cultural possibilities. However, 
the maximum vitality and worth of such academic 
programming can only be tapped if the College 
recognizes, understands, and deals with the social 
and intellectual factors which gave rise to the de- 
mand for Afro-American Studies in the first place. 
Briefly, I have observed that: 

1) Students increasingly reject Western Cultural 
(White) arrogance as de jure and normative. 

2) Students increasingly disavow the legitimacy 
of personal and group conformity as the price 
for inclusion in social systems and reward sys- 
tems. 

3) Students increasingly reject the "process" and 
"content" of formal education which symboli- 
cally and concretely advocates individual pri- 
vate regarding values as superior to group 
public regarding values. 



The preceding analysis suggests the following 
program objectives: 

1) To provide students with the opportunity to 
study and research the African background 
of Afro-Americans with emphasis on their 
pre-European contact 

2) To provide students with the opportunity to 
analyze the philosophical, psychological, eco- 
nomic, and political roots of American racism. 

3) To provide students with the opportunity to 
systematically explore the question of institu- 
tion-building in the economic, political, and 
social realm in Black Communities. 

4) To encourage students to systematically ex- 
plore the creation of new social norms and or- 
ganizing principles as policy alternatives to the 
status quo in America's national life. 

Program Format ■ 

A. Each student would complete 6-8 semester 
courses from the College's offering approved 
by the Committee on Afro-American Studies. 

B. In addition to the above, the student in his ju- 
nior year would participate in an interdisci- 
prilnary seminar (AA4-5)* designed to analyz 
plinary seminar (AA4-5)* designed to ana- 
lyze the range of discrete problems and pri- 
orities facing the Black Community within 

(Please torn to page t) 



y 



\ 



\ 






• 



\ 



\ 



\ 
\ 



PAGE TWO 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1969 



JSu 



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OEO Lawyer 



• • 



(Continued from page 1) 

his law work before he threw the 
floor open to a discussion of spe- 
cific cases and beliefs. In his work 
in Mississippi, the most important 
thing for him to do is to get a case 
resolved before it goes to the 
courts. Once the courts take jur- 
isdiction, no matter what the de- 
cision, the law will be forced on 
the community from the outside. 



If the people of the community, 
in most cases blacks, can take the 
political power of a just cause be- 
fore it gets to the court, they will 
have powerfully increased their 
political clout. This must happen, 
because only when the poor can 
fight for themselves will they be 
a free people. 

As far as Spriggs is concerned, 
it will be a great achievement if 



Coming to UMP on Saturday, November 29th 

"The Spectras" 

From University of New Hampshire, a Nine-Man Band 

Dance starts at 8:00 p.m. in the Gym for $1 .50 

and runs till midnight 

Tickets sold only at the door. 




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the Nixon Administration does 
not slide back into the past. Even 
the conservative judges are balk- 
ing at many -of Nixon's acts, in the 
recent desegregation trial in Mis- 
sissippi, when Finch, of the Ad- 
ministration, sent a recommenda- 
tion to a Federal Court, one 
Judge, a persistent conservative 
thorn in the side of Civil Rights 
lawyers, tried to convene the lar- 
gest court of appeals in the coun- 
try to censure Nixon for his clear 
breach of the Constitutionally-de- 
fined separation of powers. "In 
Mississippi," continued Spriggs, 
"you can feel the enthusiasm (for 
Nixon's Administration) on the 
part of the most irresponsible ele- 
ments of the white society." In- 
deed, were there to be another 
election today, Nixon is doing so 
much for the South that Wallace 
would not even threaten to run, 
and Nixon would win the whole 
Southern swath. 

Military injustice is another of 
Spriggs' main concerns. At pres- 
ent an enlisted man can be court- 
martialed on the arbitrary deci- 
sion of a commissioned officer; in * 
the court martial, the command- 
ing officer of the base chooses the 
prosecuting attorney, the judge, 
and the defense attorney: the de- 
fendant cannot even choose the 
mai^who will represent him. The 
other incredible problem is the 
racism in the military. In battle, 
it is easy to shoot a man you don't 
like, he said, and he has person- 
ally talked to men who say they 
have shot blacks, and they know 
many other who have or would 
like to. One of Spriggs' present 
cases concerns military racism. 

At Fort Bragg, there is no 
question that blacks are not wel- 
come in the white on-base bar. 
Consequently, the blacks drink 
and party in the fields on base 
property. One night, as eight 
"plowed" blacks were returning 
to their own barracks, they were 
jumped by 15-35 (depending on 
whether you count the specta- 
tors) whites with sawed-off 
broomhandles. The blacks won. 
From there they went to the 
white bar and caused a great deal 
of damage. 

Assault and battery court-mar- 
tial charges have been brought 
against the blacks. Currently five 
of them are being tried on five 
counts, including two for rioting 
and one for conspiracy to incite 
riot : the counts carry a maximum 
penalty of 86 years. No charges 
have been brought against the 
whites. Fortunately, when Spriggs 
brought the case before the Ap- 
peals Court for an injunction pro- 
hibiting the trials, the judge, in 
refusing the injunction, promised 
that the proceedings of the court- 
martial would be watched in great 
detail: This will ensure at least a 
minimum of justice in the military 
court. Nevertheless, Spriggs, 
stated, "if we succeed (with mili- 
tary injustice) beyond our wild- 
est dreams, we won't be near any- 
thing that could be called jus- 
tice." y 

Kent Spriggs is definitely pessi- 
mistic. He has so little faith in 
the American system at present, 
and especially the Nixon Admin- 
istration, that his goal for the 
1970's is only to so thoroughly 
screw up American government 
that it can no longer impose its 
injustices on the other peoples of 
the world. 

For Letters To The Editor, Write: 
' EDITOR, THE ORIENT 
Moulton Union, Campus 



Stowe Travel 

Thanksgiving Bus 

Non-Stop to Boston 

November 26 

Loovti Moulton Union at 1 P-m- 

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(Coll Stewc For Reotrvotioni) 
(No Slgnlac Up — No ObUfation) 



FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 21, *!969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE THREE 



War Protesters -Attacked_Gfflipcil Plans J^ 01 ' I et€rans Wam Protestets 



By JEFF DRl'MMOND 

Last Friday night a group of 
anti-war demonstrators was at- 
tacked on the Brunswick mall. 
Under the direction of a commit- 
tee formed of Aleck Turner, John 
Murphy, and Bob Loeb, a group 
of students and townspeople had 
received permission from Town 
Manager Bibber to read, on the 
Mall, the names of all the men 
killed in the Vietnam War. The 
committee had also received the 
use of a town house and the am- 
plifying equipment of high school 
student David Hunt. 

Friday night, at nine o'clock the 
committee turned off the amplifi- 
cation equipment. Suddenly at ten 

Poet, Laborer 
Rick Masten 



Performs 



By FRED CUSICK 

California is the only state in 
the Union with two cultures, 
northern and southern. Southern 
California has given us such mod- 
ern folk heroes as Richard Nixon, 
Ronald Reagan, and Walt Disney. 
Northern California has popula- 
rized Dylan, Dustin Hoffman, and 
LSD. Together they resemble a 
swimming pool on a smog free 
day. One side, the northern, is 
slightly deeper than the other, but 
the general effect is one of glare. 

Last Monday night there ap- 
peared in the Terrace Under a 
genuine, uncensored example of 
California culture. Ric Masten, 
dropout turned songwriter 
turned dropout turned Bahai fol- 
lower turned dropout again 
turned Unitarian, sang songs, 
read poetry, and talked about 
himself to an audience that wan- 
dered in and out. 

Masten, in appearance at least, 
was a synthesis of California's 
two cultures. He was over thirty, 
balding, and wore glasses (the 
Southern California look), but he 
also had a beard, a guitar, and a 
long-haired friend (the Northern 
California look). He spent sev- 
eral years in Hollywood as a song- 
writer for Elvis Presley and other 
giants before fleeing to the Big 
Sur and a job as a day laborer. 
"The thing about being a day la- 
borer was that I could go away 
for a couple of days and sing 
somewhere and come back, and 
the job would still be there. If 
you dig a ditch well you can al- 
ways find a job." 

"I spent some years in Holly- 
wood as a songwriter during the 
Presley era. Perhaps you remem- 
ber my biggest song 'BABY! . . . 
BABY!! . . . BABY!!! You're a 
thinking man's girl.' Well, you 
may laugh but that song got me 
four thousand. That's one of the 
reasons I left." 

Not many people showed up for 
Masten's sing-in and I think I 
know why. He was billed as a poet 
and singer. Everybody has seen 
a poet or singer but when was the 
last time you saw a day laobrer 
perform at Bowdoin. * 



o'clock seven men and two women 
came from the bar across the 
street. According to Loeb, at leai t 
some of the men were "obviously 
intoxicated." Some of the men 
charged the readers and equip- 
ment, cursing and shouting ob- 
scene threats. The three students 
were, reportedly, physically at- 
tacked and the bench holding the 
equipment was overturned. The 
students moved the equipment 
back to the lawn of the house and 
continued reading from there. The 
table, chair and equipment were 
moved back to the Mall in the 
early morning, and the reading 
continued without further inci- 
dent. 

According to Hunt, the damage 
to his system was approximately 
$300, and Loeb signed a civil com- 
plaint against three of the men 
for that amount and for two 
counts of assault and battery. As 
far as Loeb was concerned, 
though, the main point of the trial 
Thursday morning at 10:30 was 
to recover the money for the 
damage. 



Mixer, Meal 
For Biafra 



By ERIC WEISS 

The Student Council met brief- 
ly last Monday night to complete 
plans for Bowdoin's first mixer. 
The mixer is scheduled for Satur- 
day,- December 13, the 3ay of the 
Bowdoin-Army hockey game (A 
reception and dance are sched- 
uled; any student wishing to 
"mix" at these will have to" pay 
$2.00.) Despite the "service 
charge" many Council members 
were worried about the mixer's 
success. It was felt that if this 
mixer doesn't go well any future 
mixers will suffer. The Council 
voted additional funds to cover 
the possibility that they may wind 
up in the red. 

The Council also voted to post- 
pone the Junior class election be- 
cause half of the candidates' pe- 
titions had not been turned in. 
The date of the "Give Up a Meal 
for Biafra" day was set. It will 
be December 4th. 



Profs Enter Town Race 



By JOE COVE 

One year after the wildest, 
most violent Presidential election 
in American political history, 
Bowdoin College is witnessing one 
of the more docile races to the 
polls, the Town of Brunswick elec- 
tion on Dec. 1. The elections are 
particularly pertinent to Bow- 





DECEMBER 




INTERVIEWS 


Nov. 


20 National Security 




Agency Civil Ser- 




v i c e Commission 




(at Senior Center) 


Dec. 


2 Rutgers Graduate 




School of Account- 




ing 


Dec. 


4 Ernst & Ernst 


Dec. 


4 Syracuse Univer- 




sity Law School 


/ Dec. 


5 Lincoln Electric 


Dec. 


5 Univ. of Rochester 




Graduate School of 




Business 


Dec. 


8 Worcester County . 




National Bank 


Dec. 


8 John Hancock In- 




surance 


Dec. 


8 Univ. of Pennsyl- 




vania, Wharton 




School 


Dec. 


9 Travelers Insur- 




ance 


Dec. 


9 Brown University 




MAT (at the Se- 




nior Center) 


Dec. 


10 Royal-Globe 


Dec. 


10 Pittsburgh - Des 




Moines 


Dec. 


10 Chubb & Son 


Dec. 


11 Warren Paper Co 


Dec. 


11 National Insurance 




Co 


Dec. 


11 Babson College 




Business School 


Dec. 


12" Arthur Young 


Dec. 


12 Andover Company 


Dec. 


16 U.S. Treasury 



doin since four members of the 
college community are campaign- 
ing for offices. Mr. Harry Warren, 
director of the Moulton Union, 
Prof. Edward Pols of the Philos- 
ophy Department; Mr. Thomas 
Libby, the College Bursar and 
Mr. Wolcott Hokanson, Vice Pres- 
ident of the College are all seek- 
ing election to the town council 
from their respective districts. 

Mr. Warren has served as Vice 
Chairman of the Town Charter 
Committee and has been as he 
terms it, "a summer complaint in 
the town for the last twenty 
years." Prof. Pols is seeking poli- 
tical office for the first time in 
tcwn while Mr. Libby had served 
as Tcwn Manager for ten years 
before becoming Bursar and is 
presently one of five town select- 
men. Mr. Hokanson is currently 
Chairman of the Town Finance 
Committee and a long-time resi- 
dent cf the town. 

Bowdoin College has always 
played an integral role in commu- 
nity relations. Presidents Sills and 
Coles served on the Brunswick 
School Committee; Dean Greason 
is presently an active member of 
the Committee. For one hundred 
and eleven years Brunswick has 
been struggling to change its pres- 
ent town meeting form of govern- 
ment to a nine man representa- 
tive council. To do this a new 
charter had to be drawn up by the 
town and approved by the state 
legislature. A committee headed 
by Prof. Donovan of the Govern- 
ment Department and Mr. War- 
ren wrote a new charter and pre- 
sented it to the Maine Legisla- 
ture: Bowdoin is a vital part of 
of the Brunswick Community; as 
Mr. Libby commented, "We have 
the type of people in the college 
community who do care and do 
participate." 



Lewis Discusses Afro-Am Problems 



(Continued from page 1) 

the United States. This seminar would ac- 
quaint the student with the research methods 
and bibliography of Afro-American Studies. 

C. In his senior year, the student would partici- 
pate in a policy colloquium ) Economic Devel- 
opment, Politics, etc.) and pursue a problem 
of special interest, This independent research 
under faculty guidance would be carried out 
individually or collectively by members of this 
colloquium (AA6-7).* 

: '( Afro- American Studies 4-5 and 6-7) are offered 
under the sponsorship of the Committee on Afro- 
American Studies. 

D. Each student with the Committee's approval 
shall establish a minor by the pursuit of at 
least four courses. 

It is of the utmost importance that the college or 
university have a context of values for a program 



in Afro-American studies. Implicit in a relevant 
value framework is the commitment to action for 
the attainment of social justice and human prog- 
ress. While it may be argued that detachment and 
objectivity are required for the discovery of truth, 
and it is possible to study a black ghetto in this 
manner, of what value are the results? Truth re- 
quires meaning, and meaning requires a context of 
values. Colleges and universities concerned with hu- 
manity and justice would not study physical sick- 
ness in society except to cure it. Therefore, mean- 
ingful or relevant truth requires commitment to 
actions that will facilitate human advancement and 
survival. In sum, the college or university which 
establishes a program in Afro-American studies, in 
the foregoing context becomes relevant not only to 
the black masses in America, but also to the modal 
society. Thus it becomes committed to resolving the 
major domestic issue of our times. 



Commies Will Get Them Next 

By RICK FITCH 

College Press Service 

"Oh, we don't smoke marijuany, 

don't take trips on LSDeee, 

don't burn draft cards on Main St. 

we like livin' right and free." ' 

WASHINGTON — (CPS) — Let's hear a big round of applause for 
J. W. Martin and the Starlighters. In fact, forget that. Let's all clap 
for good old America. Don't be bashful. We are proud to be Americans. 

The place was the Washington Monument, the time, Veterans Day, 
and the event, a "Freedom Rally" sponsored by the American Legion 
and the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) to show that silent Ameri- 
can is behind President Nixon's Vietnam policy. 

The homespun country lyrics of the Starlighters, curiously enough, 
drew more response from the crowd of approximately 10,000 than the 
rhetoric offered by the rally's "big guns" — Sen. John Towers (R-Tex.), 
Rep. Mendel Rivers (D-S.C.) and Rep. Donald Lukens (R-Qhio). 

The sights were slightly surreal. Just to the south of the monument, 
a dozen or so people stood silently on an elevated wooden platform 
holding American flags and three posters which read like Burma Shave 
signs: "Communism is the Enemy/Russia is the Quarterback/Peace 
through Victory." 

Flags were everywhere. Miniature ones sprouted from thousands of 
breast-pockets; ladies put them in their hair. Many wore red-white- 
and-blue armbands. Next to a 20-foot high American flag that pro- 
vided the backdrop for the stage was a small flag representing the Re- 
public of South Vietnam. 

Lukens told the gathering it is not enough for the U.S. to be con- 
cerned with providing freedom for the people of South Vietnam, South 
Korea and West Germany; we must make North Vietnam, North Ko- 
rea and East Germany free too. He compared our previous dealing with 
the Communists to a man who sits in his front room talking to a bur- 
glar, discussing when it would be convenient for the burglar to leave. 

"He's got no right to be there in the first place," Lukens shouted. 

A southern business executive took the podium and cried out that 
"The south has risen again, this time under the banner of the stars 
and stripes." He accused those in the peace movement of spreading 
the "lie" that God is dead in order to subvert the country's morals. 
Another speaker declared there is "more goodness" in one boyscout 
holding an American flag than in the whole antiwar protest. 

There were scattered contingents of the. enemy. Longhaired Mobili- 
zation workers handed out leaflets and engaged in occasional argu- 
ments with the "loyalists." Back at the wooden platform, one man, 
carrying, the "Russia is the Quarterback "sign, pointed at a freaky- 
looking person and said, "You are next, you are the next victim of 
Communist." 

But antiwar people stayed away for the most part, as did young 
people. Perhaps one person in six at the rally was under 21. The 64- 
year-old Rivers, white hair blowing in the wind, said in a cracked and 
crusty voice, "There are more of us patriotic Americans than those 
pro Hanoi-crats. Keep up the fight. Spiro Aghew is helping us. You 
back up Spiro and he will continue to pour it on." Whistles, cheers. 

The placards in the crowd reflected a startling political orientation. 
One said "Spock has colic," another "100,000,000 dead from Commu- 
nism, will You be Next," another, "Kill the Commies." People passed 
out buttons saying "Tell it to Hanoi," and "America — ■ Love it or 
Leave it." 

A pamphlet entitled, "It's Time for Reason ... not Treason," called 
upon businessmen to stop all production that might eventually aid 
Communist countries. 

Everyone awaited Tower of Texas, and his speech was country lickin' 
good, as they say. "The silent majority has become very vocal indeed," 
he said in deep-throated, manly tones, gazing commandingly down at 
the crowd. Though we all know the war is ugly and despicable, he said, 
those who are against it are cowardly. 

"We did not ask to be a great military power," he said. "It was the 
Communist aggressors after World War II who started the arms race." 
He lost a few points when he declared, in the midst of thousands of 
greying veterans, that, "This generation of fighting men is the greatest 
this nation has ever seen." 

But he gained the points back when he said Americans would rather 
die as free men than live as slaves, and intimated that "some men in 
public life who should know better" are Communist sympathizing, sell- 
out artists. 

The rally ended after 2V 2 hours with everyone singing "God Bless 
America," and people passing out bumper stickers with these words: 
"Thank You for Loving America." 

Hexter Will Lecture 



Professor Jack Hexter, a noted 
authority on 16th and 17th cen- 
tury English History, will speak 
at Bowdoin Monday, December 1 
at 7:30. The subject will be "The 
Annihilation of History," and Mr. 
Hexter has furnished us with the 
following statement about this 
subject: 

This lecture takes a new look at 
an old question : what is the use 
of history? It does so by taking 
the question seriously enough 
to suggest- that if history is of 
no use it should be annihilated 
and then raises the question of 
whether we are willing to ac- 
cept the consequences that such 
annihilation entails, 

Mr. Hexter has also written «n 
article entitled "Publish or Per- 
ish — a Defense" which has been 
published in the Fall, 1969, issue 
of the journal, The Public Inter- 
est. The starting point for this ar- 
ticle is the question of student 



participation in faculty evaluation 
brought out at Yale by the Bern- 
stein case. Mr. Hexter attempts 
to show why it is not realistic to 
use student estimates of teaching 
performance as a basis for proino- 
tion and tenure. He regards schol- 
arly research and publication as a 
far more realistic basis for aca- 
demic preferment at universities 
and colleges of top quality. 

A native of Memphis, Tennes- 
see, Mr. Hexter began his first 
teaching job at the University of 
Cincinnati in 1936 and the follow- 
ing year he taught at Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. He 
was a member of the faculty at 
Queens College from 1939-57, be- 
fore his appointment as professor 
of history and chairman of the de- 
partment at Washington Univer- 
sity, St. Louis. 

He has held two Guggenheim 
Fellowships in 1945-46 and 1947- 
48; two Fulbright Fellowships, in 
1950 to France and in 1959-60 to 



PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. "NOVEMBER 21, 1969 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



DC March 



Volume XCIX 



Friday. November 21, 196!) 



Number H 



The Experience Of Politics 

Why Washington? What is the significance of the marches, 
rallies, and proto-riots that took place in Washington, D.C. last 
weekend? The answer depends on who asked, not because each 
participant has his own theory about the 'real' meaning of the 
events, but because the real meaning is the significance of events 
for each participant. The protests were part of a two day anti- 
convention. At a political convention people with a nominal 
agreement gather to fashion a compromise on substantive is- 
sues. In Washington, individuals with agreement on substantive 
issues gathered to reinforce their own individual ideas in the 
protection and security of crowds of supporters. They could 
afford not to form a working compromise because they can do 
nothing that will change the course of the war. One is respon- 
sible only when one feels there will be a response. 

Of course, the march on Washington was not intended to be 
an anti-convention. Many participants suffered from the delu- 
sion that protest will work. The New Mobe organizers believe 
that if the protest is kept peaceful, orderly, and vague it will- 
change the mind of the silent majority, i.e. Nixon. Others, the 
radicals, think that things will change if the protests become 
more militant and violent. They both want an establishment, 
only a "better" one. 

The peaceful protestors enjoy-- taking credit for changing 
American policy. Dick Gregory remarked Saturday that Nixon 
can find out how much he will be moved by protest by calling 
the LBJ ranch. "A little more pressure," they think. "Wait till 
six million turn out." • 

Yet, there is no justification for their self-esteem. No one has 
shown in what way the protestors toppled Johnson. In fact, the 
acclaim for the Spock trial, the support for Mayor Daley, an.d 
the election of Nixon belie the New Mobe's theory. Further- 
more, there is reason to believe that even the most sincere Presi- 
dent would not be moved by peace demonstrations, for the Pres- 
ident is the creature of those around him. Recent studies of the 
making of policy reveal that the President is easily susceptible to 
the belief that the information he gets from his advisors makes 
him better able to decide than any of his critics. Kennedy al- 
lowed the CIA to mislead him, and Johnson let the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff lead him by the nose. No matter how many came out, 
Nixon might still feel the silent majority is behind him. 

The New Mobe is moribund because the Spock trial, the 
Chicago Eight trial, at the police riot in Chicago, and the tactics 
of the Nixon Administration have created a new outlook. Peo- 
ple can really no longer take the traditional politics of the New 
Mobe seriously; they can no longer take politics seriously. The 
demonstrations were, for many who took part, a parody of dis- 
sent against a parody of a government. More people will em- 
brace the nihilistic irresponsibility of Abbie Hoffman. 

More people will turn to violence and more will play games 
with their opponents; they will try to tease them into absurd- 
and outrageous behavior. They will try to goad the great silent 
dinosaur into self-destructive action. 

Others will loose interest in politics and compromise. Their 
commitment will be to life and enjoying life. 



Hexter ... Fiorello 



(Continued from page 3) 
the University of Edinburgh, and 
a Ford Foundation Fellowship in 
195>1. In 1966-67 he was a fellow 
of the Center for Advanced Study 
in the Behavioral Sciences. 

Professor Hexter is known 
among historians for his challeng- 
ing essays in historical interpre- 
tation. His book. Reappraisals in 
History, has been acclaimed as one 
of the most searching works of re- 
cent years in the field of histori- 
ography. He also has written au- 
thoritative studies of Sir Thomas 
More's Utopia and of the early 
history' of the Long Parliament 
in England. 

He is the author of The Reign 
of King Pym, More's Utopia, The 
Biography of an Idea, and Reap- 
praisals in History. He is a mem- 
ber of the editorial board of The 
Journal of British Studies and 
The Journal of the History, of 
Ideas, and is co-editor of The Com- 
plete Works of Thomas More and 
general editor of The Traditions 
of the Western World. 
Degrees: 

B. A., University of Cincinnati, 

1931 

M.A., Harvard University. 1933 

Ph.D., Harvard University, 1937 

Litt.D., Brown University, 1964 



.(Continued from page 1) 
stout that the script and Pecken- 
hain make him. 

Louise Stoddard is superb in 
the part of Marie, the love-sick 
secretary. Her unshakeable good- 
ness and courage keep the play 
going even in the dead spots. 

Larry Cohen as Fiorello's Jew- 
ish assistant and Steve Sylvester 
as Ben Moreno provide the best 
musical and dramatic perfor- 
mances of the evening. Cohen's 
continuing battle with his wife 
and Sylvester's lament for La- 
Guardia's election are the fun- 
niest moments in the production. 
It is difficult to decide who is the 
better scene stealer. 

A few actors deserve special 
praise for expanding their tiny 
roles. Gretchen Nash overacts 
gloriously in the part of Dora. 
Greg Darling plays her stupid 
husband to perfection and Rick 
Ludmerer, a non-drinker, plays 
his drunk scenes with consider- 
able skill. 

The other actors and the chor- 
us range from good to terrible. 
The chorus girls in the Charleston 
number are the most persuasive 
argument we have yet seen for 
co-education at Bowdoin. 

Fiorello is a soothing evening 
at the theater. It is not profound 
or very moving, but it's at least 
fun to watch if not to think 
about. 



I— Tf 

Moratorium; Pigs On Bo% Side& 



By ALAN KOLOD 

We stood around in the cold 
drizzle waiting for the bus to Ar- 
lington Cemetery where we would 
begin the long walk towards the 
White House. I felt a bit ill about 
the prospect of taking part in the 
March Against Death, because I 
don't believe that 40,000 dead 
G.I.8 are what's wrong with our 
involvement in Vietnam. It 
seemed dishonest to use the name 
cf a dead man one doesn't care 
abcut in order to show how much 
one cares. 

I'm too touchy about hypocrisy 
and oversimplification to enjoy 
mass rallies. I only bought those 
peace buttons I could interpret to 
mean things I agreed with. That 
left me with "RESIST" and "If 
you're not part of the solution, 
then you're part of the problem." 
It probably would have offended 
some of the people down there 
that I was resisting them and 
wondering whether we Were real- 
ly part of the solution. ' J 

The long wait, the cold rain, 
and my uneasiness about the 
march finally induced me to head 
for George Washington Univer- 
sity where Abbie Hoffman and 
rther luminaries of the Movement 
were to speak. Unfortunately, 
things weren't going to begin un- 
til 10:00 and the march against 
the South Vietnamese embassy 
was scheduled for 9:00. I left for 
Dupont Circle after listening to 
some student speaker trying to 
use the word "fuck" casually 
when it obviously gave him a 
thrill to say it. before a large au- 
dience. 

I a rrived after the first pepper 
gas cannisters had been set off 
and watched a TV cameraman get 
shots of the few people with Viet 
Cong flags as they retreated. This 
was the first of several experi- 
ences which made me aware of 
how mas* media coverage can be. 
I'd never been gased before, and 
the little I was tasting then re- 
minded me of some pepper gum I 
once bought in a joke store. I 
cautiously walked forward while 
people around me moved in both 
directions. Some guy screamed 
that these were the people's 
streets and that they had a right 
to be there. 

When I got about half a block 
away from the embassy, the po- 
lice set off a few more cannisters. 
Within a few seconds I couldn't 
see; mucus ran from my nose and 
I choked on the gas. About ten 
minutes later I was able to open 
my eyes and discovered I was two 
blocks on the other side of Du- 
pont Circle. 

You're helpless Without a gas 
mask, so there wasn't any point 
in going back. I stepped into a bar 
on Connecticut Ave., and laughed 
about the whole thing. George Or- 
well once said he was glad he had 
been shot in the Spanish Civil 
War because he knew afterwards 
that getting shot wasn't so bad 
and wouldn't have to be afraid 
when the Revolution came. 

The 1>ar was crowded with 
freaks who had been driven off 
the street by gas. The waitress 
obviously didn't care for her cus- 
tomers and complained about how 
rude and obnoxious they were. 
"They think I've got 2000 arms." 
Someone liberated her cigarettes 
and she swore at the freaks. 
"They're not hippies, they're 
thieves." I smiled when ever the 
bartender made a crack about- 
somebody's hair, so he thought I 
was on his side. 

An older man with a gas mask 
came in and ordered a shot of te- 
quilla with lemon and salt. I asked 
him if the gas mask worked. 
"No." Then he muttered, "Those 
radicals think they're fighting a 
war." He pulled out a notebook 
and wrote. "Did you see that rad- 
ical asshole throw that garbage 
can in the street?" He stood up. 
adjusted his mask, and was off 



again into the night. 

Next a drunk fellow sat down. 
He reported that the military po- 
lice were on the street and that 
he had seen them earlier at 14th 
and New York. He asked me how 
I felt about the war. I told him. 
Then I asked him. He said he 
didn't know too much about Viet- 
nam, but he had taught high 
schocl in Syria and become anti- 
Israel and pro-Arab and had 
taught in Nigeria and become 
anti-Biafra and pro-Federal Gov- 
ernment and that he suspected if 
he ever taught in Vietnam he 
would be anti-U.S. I asked him 
what he thought of the Nixon Ad- 
ministration's tough talk about 
protesters and crime; he said he 
had been mugged twice that 
month and didn't want to talk 
about it. 

Two young guys, who looked as 
if they might be soldiers on leave, 
came in and announced that the 
M.P.s had ordered everyone off 
the streets. They told the teacher 
how upset they were that they 



led him to believe the police had 
acted with restraint. The Observ- 
ers might be called the referees 
of the Revolution; they are young 
lawyers who make sure that 
everybody acts properly in case of . 
a riot, and issue a report on what 
they've seen from the vantage 
point of their church or bar out- 
post. 

Some radicals were driving U- 
Haul trucks and dropping off 
crates of apples at street corners. 
I asked one person if he were 
watching or was involved; he said 
he had eaten an apple and once 
you eat one of the Revolution's 
apples you're involved. Up the 
street a man was trying to throw 
apples through a plate glass win- 
dow while newspaper men photo- 
graphed him. The apples kept 
splattering, so he finally had to 
borrow a bottle to smash the win- 
dew. Then he drove off in his U- 
Haul truck. 

The police set off more pepper 
gas. The second time you see gas 
go off, you don't hang around to 




couldn't go to the movie. (I Am 
Curious (Yellow i was playing up 
the block). He remarked that, 
"It's a terrible injustice when you 
c< mo to see a dirty movie and the 
cops order you off the street." 

Before I left he asked me what 
I was doing in D.C. I told him I 
was covering the peace demon- 
stration for a newspaper. He 
agreed it was probably better to. 
talk to people in a bar about it 
than go out and watch; then he 
said that when he had written a 
poem about a horse's funeral he 
decided to listen to the radio in- 
stead of going. 

The crowd had moved up to Du- 
pont Circle. As I walked around 
I heard people mutter angrily 
about being gased. How could 
anyone hang around a mob that 
had tried to storm an embassy 
and be offended about being 
gased? 

A man with a taperecorder 
stopped a man with a blue 'Ob- 
server' ribbon and asked him 
whether the police had acted with 
the proper restraint. The Observ- 
er said he had spent most of the 
evening in a Local church where 
people were treated for gas inhal- 
ation, but that what he had seen 






find out what's happening. It was 
getting late, so I headed for Alex- 
andria. 

The next rriorning we drove to 
the Mall and waited for our turn 
to March. We milled around and 
waited, and watched a guerilla 
theatre group do a play about the 
people's park in Berkeley, and 
waited. At 12:15 someone an- 
nounced over the loudspeaker that 
' the March permit expired at 12:30 
and those who hadn't got out yet 
were to turn around and walk 
across the Mall to the Wash- 
ington Monument. Lots of peo- 
ple were angry and shouted that 
we march anyway and refused to 
turn around. Other people got 
angry because those people might 
start trouble with the police. Fi- 
nally, everyone turned around and 
walked to the rally. 

When we all sat on the grass 
everyone was amazed at how 
many people had come. Mayor 
Walter Washington told us" that 
there must be a million, and I 
think he was right. The first 
speakers were rotten. A former 
Secretary of Commerce or some- 
thing said the Nixon Administra- 
tion should take a lesson from 
(Please turn to page 5) 



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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT* 



PAGE FIVE 



Peace, Violence, Theatre Make Up Washington Protest 






(Continued from page 1) 

signs off the pews. A New Mobe 
marshal, after a deal of running, 
taught her and returned her to 
her parents. I could imagine him 
muttering under his breath, 
"Damn kid! Just gonna screw up 
the system. . . ." I was on the 
girl's side, which makes me the 
second defector. 
Ill 

After waiting three hours, it 
struck me that it was perhaps ab- 
surd to wait any longer for a bus 
that would take me six miles out 
of town so that I could walk back 
in. One demonstrates, I think, for 
two reasons: because it feels good 
and because it may accomplish 
something. The march would not 
feel good, and I have doubts 
about whether Richard Nixon 
can see or hear any thing other 
that Henry Kissinger. I left. 

A mass rally had been sched- 
uled at George Washington Uni- 
versity, featuring a variety of 
mass rally acts, and starring the 
defendants of the Chicago con- 
spiracy case. With a friend, I be- 
gan to walk in the direction of 
G.W. 

While the New Mobe was try- 
ing to find its busses, the more 
impatient revolutionaries were 
walking. At Eighteenth St. we 
came across a column of Weather- 
men on their way to evict the Sai- 
gon embassy. The Weathermen 
take themselves very seriously. 
Male and female, they were all 
wearing helmets, fatigue jackets, 
and heavy boots. The police wear 
the same sort of costume. The two 
groups enjoy battling each other, 
which is why they dress alike. It's 
all in the American tradition of 
fair play. Unfortunately, the po- 
lice were forbidden to play Fri- 
day, so they used CF or pepper 
gas, which sent the Weathermen 
home crying. 

The GW rally had been moved 
outside because of the size of the 
crowd. We were among the first 



great cock on the Potomac" to 
the "Injustice Department." The ' 
purpose was to "picket; pick it up 
and take it away." The two speak- 
ers, Jerry Rubin and Abbie Hoff- 
man both had tremendous the- 
atre. At the end of their talks, 
they led the crowd in a chant. 
"1-2, stop the trial, 3-4, stop the 
trial, 5-6, stop the trial, 7-8, smash 
the state." Amid shouts of "Right 
on!" they left for another rally. 

A grey haired lady had been sit- 
ting on the hood of the car all 
evening. Perhaps she had even ap- 
peared in the film of the way 
things really are. She was an en- 
thusiastic chanter. I watched her 
yell "7-8, smash the state" sev- 
eral times, her gloved fist in the 
air. She was the third defector. 
IV 

Saturday was sunny but cold. 
The gentle army had swarmed 
over the city. We slept in the 
apartment, of a GW student. She 
had nine people staying with her. 
The walls of her building were 
full of people, sleeping close to- 
gether to stay warm. 

We walked to the Washington 
Monument past lines of police. In- 
side a government garage, four 
armored trucks and a group of sol- 
diers were visible. Official obser- 
vers were on top of all the build- 
ings with walkie-talkie and cam- 
eras. There was an atmosphere of 
going to a football game . . . "our 
traditional rival, the game that 
can make or break a season." We 
arrived at the monument about 
ten, and the crowd was vast. By 
dodging past the New Mobe mar- 
shals, we were able to join the 
march quickly. There were three 
distinct groups involved, identified 
by their chants. The Peace Now 
group was the largest . . . "What 
do we want? Peace. When do we 
want it? Now." . . . "All we are 
saying is give peace a chance." 
The political people went next . . . 
"1-2-3-4, we don't want this fuck- 
ing war, 5-6-7-8. we don't want 




to arrive. One of the sound men 

had parked a car in front of the 
stage, and we sat in it to keep 
warm. We smoked and listened to 
the revolution on the radio. 

An Englishman was making a 
film to depict "things the way 
they really are." He pleaded with 
the crowd to be more "real," but 
no one was sure just what he 
wanted, and everyone was too 
cold to care. Finally, he filmed us 
sitting and smoking in the sound 
man's car. After that, no one else 
would come in. They did not want 
their parents to see them in the 
film of "the way things really 
are." 

The Chicago conspiracy group 
finally arrived at about 9:30. Air- 
port police had detained them be- 
cause Abbie Hoffman stood 
on the seat. They were recruiting 
for a march Saturday from the 
Washington Monument, "that 



this fascist state." . . . "Ho, Ho 

Ho, Ho Chi Minh, NLF, is gonna 
win." The smallest group was 
having fun. "What do we want? 
Ron Swoboda. When do we want 
it? Now." "Let's go Mets." . . . 
"All we are saying is pull down 
your pants." 

There was a business suited 
man in the window of the Feder- 
al Trade Commission Building. He 
was beaming and giving the peace 
sign. I'm not sure which group he 
was in, but he was the fourth de- 
fector. 

V 

The rally at the Washington 
Monument was cold. The speakers 
and the sound system were on a 
raised platform. The wind blew 
the sound away so that if you 
were any distance away, you could 
only hear every third word. We 
went to a pornographic movie and 
fell asleep. 



At about 4:00, we left the the- 
atre and began to walk toward the 
Washington Monument. The sky 
was overcast, and Pennsylvania 
Avenue glistened where sanita- 
tion crews had washed it down af- 
ter the morning's march. The 
atmosphere was entirely different 
now; paranoia was in the air. The 
police were armed and helmeted, 



but it was not strong enough to 
drive people any farther. The re- 
treat was completely disor- 
ganized; the police -Wefte using 
gas to drive the crowd back 
down Constitution Avenue and 
then down Tenth Street to the 
Monument. Around the park the 
trash barrels were being burned, 
partly as protest and partly to 



Perhaps the gentle army re- 
alizes that. The Howard John- 
son's on the New Jersey turn- 
pike have all gone back to nor- 
mal. Despite the gas, however, 
despite the cold arid discomfort, 
Washington was an affirmation 
of an alternative. At least some 
of those who were there are not 
going back to normal. 




and were standing in tight little 

bunches smoking. Completely ac- 
cessible and helpful in the morn- 
ing, they were now unapproach- 
able. About a block away, there 
were sounds of marching and 
chanting. 

The march on the Justice De- 
partment came around the block 
up Tenth St. to Pennsylvania, 
down Pennsylvania to Ninth St. 
and down Ninth St. to Constitu- 
tion, which runs in front of the 
Justice Department. The mood of 
the marchers was wholly new; 
tense and wary, many were silent- 
ly born along with the crowd. The 
chants wore different: "Free Bob- 
by Seale" . . . "Stop the trial." 
. . . "All power to the people." No 
one was marching for fun. Sud- 
denly, thingi? were too real; where 
was the British film crew? 

Silent onlookers thronged the 
sidewalk. The police cordon was 
unbroken; to get into the march, 
one had to go between two police- 
men. We joined on tenth street. 

One block of Constitution Ave- 
nue had been cordoned off. 
Marchers poured from Ninth St.. 
packing people who were already 
there against the cordon and the 
front of the Justice Building. The 
Yippies and some Mobe mafshals 
were up front. A red flare went 
off. People were pressed against 
the doors of the building, some 
pounding and chanting, others 
struggling to move back. As the 
American flag started to come 
dowr, two windows were smashed. 
The Mobe people were yelling, 
"No Violence." 

The first canister of gas was 
thrown by the chief of police. Si- 
multaneously, several large can- 
isters were dropped by an Army 
helicopter. They were dropped on 
people more than half a block 
from the Justice building, who 
had assembled with a permit and 
were apparently orderly. 

There was a panic of people 
nearest to the exploding can- 
isters surged backwards. . . . 
Everyone was shouting, • "Be 
cool, walk." As much to maintain 
their own courage as to maintain 
order. As more and more gas was 
thrown in, the crowd retreated, 
almost grudgingly. The wind was 
blowing the gas away from the 
mass of demonstrators. 

It is difficult to describe the 
effects of the gas. Almost imme- 
diately, you cannot breath or 
see, your skin stings, and your 
lungs and nostrils begin t6 burn. 
When the gas reached me, I was 
retreating and it was diluted; I 
cannot imagine how it must feel 
to have a canister explode near 
you. I walked .with Harv Prager 
until we were beyond the gassed 
area. Although we were more than 
a block away from the Justice De- 
partment, we could see the po- 
lice spotlights and hear the ex- 
plosions of the gas. For the first 
time, the crowd was shouting 
anti-police slogans. 

We reached the park which 
surrounds the Washington Mon- 
ument. The gas was everywhere, 



keep warm. 

The first gas had been thrown. 
The police were now using gre- 
nade launchers in their efforts 
to disperse the crowd. The can- 
isters were coming in about 
twelve feet off the ground, and 
first ringed by sparks and then 
completely invisible in the .dark- 
ness; The police were firing di- 
rectly into the crowd. The can- 
isters are over a foot long and 
are heavy; when they hit the 
pavement, they rolled nnd 
skipped about thirty feet before 
exploding. 

As the marchers were driven 
closer to the Monument, some 
began to resist. Tn the glare of 
a police spotlight, a figure would 
pick up a canister and heave it 
back toward the police lines. The 
wind was blowing the gas to- 
wards . the police, several' of 
whom were badly gassed. As the 
last of the crowds reached the 
monument, perhaps a hundred 
people began to wage a pitched 
battle against the police. . . . Con- 
stitution Avenue is lined with 
benches. Persons dressed in hel- 
mets and gas masks were flown 
on the street, fielding the can- ■ 
isters and hurling them back. As 
they retreated they set the 
benches on fire, so there .was a 
row of burning benches to mark 
the battle's progress. 

By 7:30, there were oyer a 
hundred police at the Monument. 
We went down to the New Mobe 
headquarters, a plastic tent on 
the far end of the mall. The New 
Mobe people were almost crying. 
We asked the director if we 
would be able to meet our ride 
at the Monument at nine. He 
told us that over sixty canisters 
of gas had been exploded in the 
last quarter of an hour and that 
everyone should get out now. 

The busses, many of them 
parked in the gassed area, had 
been moved out of the city. Many 
were filled with the gas, which 
clings to fabric. A man of about 
forty asked me for a cigarette. 
He was the leader of a group of 
fifty from New York. He had lo- 
cated three of them. His face 
was swollen and he was crying 
from the gas. He asked me whose 
fault it was. 

VI 
And so it ended. The largest 
mass demonstration in American 
history ended with a mass of 
people confused and bewildered, 
and a few crazies on Constitu- 
tion Avenue playing games with 
the police. Washington taught 
two lessons. First, the day of the 
peaceful demonstration is over. 
Anyone who believes that an- 
other demonstration is going to 
have any effect on this country's 
government is deluding himself. 
The New Mobe was revealed for 
the absurdity it is. 

The only possible reason to go 
into the streets ugaln ts to talk 
to ourselves. If we dissipate our 
energies in delusion, the cellu- 
loid is always going to spring 
back. 



Pigs . . . 



(.Continued from page 3) 

management; a lot of people 
booed at that. A professor of biol- 
( gy at Harvard delivered a speech 
that consisted of cliches strung 
together; I had never heard some 
of them. Some guy next to us said 
the New Mobe had sold us out. by 
getting a parade permit for only 
I'- hours. He said there wasn't 
anyone under 25 on the New 
Mobe Committee and that he had 
<•( me to march not listen, to a 
rally! He insisted that a march 
would have been more effective 
for ending the war then a rally 
and said he didn't want to have 
to come back in six months for 
, more demonstrations. As I left. I 
beard a speaker ask for contribu- 
tions to enable the New Mobe pay 
off its debts and begin plans f< r 
next month. 

I IclTFiinny Hill .it 4:45 to g' 
to theSjustice Department. I 
stayed there for about an hour 
cursing myself for not having 
bought a gas mask. Some U.S. 
Marshals pulled up in a car and a 
student asked them if they were 
from the Justice Department; 
they ignored him. He said that if 
they were from the Justice De- 
partment he wished they would 
tell the police not to use tear gas 
on innocent people. They told him 
to tell the police himself. He said 
he couldn't without get'ting gased 
himself. I think the Marshals 
realized that. 

By the time I finished dinner 
several blocks away at the Gunjr 
Ho American-Chinese restaurant 
the trouble had moved to meet 
me. Every window in a large de- 
partment store was broken and 
some students stood around de- 
bating whether they should take 
the African wood carvings from 
the American Express office. They 
decided not to. 

I had made some arrangements 
to meet some friends at " the 
Washington Monument, but I dis- 
covered that the entire Mall was 
guarded by police. I walked 
around to the Southern side 
where people were warming them- 
selves in front of fires they had 
built in the street and in trash 
cans; f warmed myself and start- 
ed hitch-hiking back to Alexan- 
dria. 

The 11 o'clock news divided its 
coverage equally among the mil- 
lions who had demonstrated for 
peace, the twenty who had dem- 
onstrated for peace without sur- 
render, and the fifty who had 
marched "behind a Baptist minis- 
ter to place a wreath on the tomb 
of the unknown soldier only to be 



turned away for not acting in a 
dignified manner. It was good to 
find a station that took Agnew 
seriously and tried to make its 
news representative and unbiased. 



PAGE SIX 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 21, 1969 



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By PETER WILSON 

On Monday evening of this week an enthusiastic, 
curious and open-minded Wentworth audience 
tuned in to the first in a series of new chamber mu- 
sic concerts sponsored by the Department of Music: 
Both faculty and -students assisted in the prepara- 
tion of this series' first exposure to very recent con- 
temporary works. 

The evening's first piece, Sound Patterns No. I 
for voice and hands, was originally composed as a 
"teaching piece" intended for classroom perform- 
ance. The work makes wide use of a wide variety of 
sounds using those sources. All are clearly specified 
— with little room for chance — and placed within a 
series of beats indicated by the conductor. The work 
was performed spatially with the two choirs dis- 
tinctly separated, one remaining on the ground floor 
and the other being positioned on the two upper bal- 
conies. Amplification of the sounds aided the artic- 
ulation although there was some minor difficulty 
with the lower microphone. 

Toshiro Mayuzumi's Metamusic for saxophone, 
violin, piano, and conductor demonstrated the use 
of pantomime in contemporary composition. This 
work consists of four "parts" which, while co-exist- 
ing simultaneously, have no relationship to each 
other except that of common duration and perform- 
ance space. Many of the gestures are silent (in fact 
the entire saxophone part was without sound), set 
in a frame of isolated audible "points" of tone. The 
conductor's score was particularly amusing in its 
grandiose style, twelve-second up-beat, and juxta- 
position of a variety of tempos. The audience did not 
withhold its enjoyment of the performance. 

The concert's third presentation was Cornelius 



ures of the recent English avant-garde movement. 
The work, like all of the others performed, is an 
interesting study in the techniques of very recent 
notation. Its complications are not unlike those pre- 
sented in Medieval systems. The composition fol- 
lows Cardew's general procedure of using "indeter- 
minate" notation as stimulus for precise, notated 
performance, rather than improvisation. The num- 
ber of instruments is not specified and each per- 
former writes out his own "part" according to his 
realization of the "score." Every item of informal, 
tion on the score (clef, note, name of instrument, 
dynamic marking, etc.) counts as an "indication." 
If there are more than two indications in a beat, the 
performer is to ignore two of them; if only two in- 
dications, he is to contradict them both; if only one, 
he is to do it if at all possible. Adherence to the in- 
dications may be accomplished by the performers 
in a variety of ways and the' ensemble admirably 
adhered. 

The final composition of the evening was a delight 
for most of the audience. Terry Riley, a San Fran- 
cisco musician, is the composer of the fascinating 
and highly acclaimed In C which has been per- 
formed many times throughout the world and re- 
cently recorded for Columbia records. The work 
can be played by any number of instruments; all 
performers play the same series of fifty-three 
phrases, repeating each as long as they choose be- 
fore going on to the text. Tempo given initially, 
and sustained, by repeated eighth note high Cs in 
the piano. These are continually repeated through- 
out the work (with proper recognition) to the en- 
durance of Professor Beckwith). the total duration 
of which is entirely free. 




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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 



OSU'S plight 



"// We're Number One" 



(Continued from page 8) 

Finally, post-season exposure 
is essential to those college play- 
ers who wish to play professional, 
football. Scouts and pro coaches 
study these encounters intensive-) 

WRITERS' POLL 

FOOTBALL RATINGS 

By The Associated Ftui 

The Top 20, points figured on 
a 20-18-16-14-12-10-9 8-7-6-5-4-3-2- 
1 basis for first through 20th 
places (first-place votes in paren- 
theses) and won-lost-tied records. 

1— Ohio State (31) 8 

2— Texas (7) .... . .. 8 

S — Arkansas 8 

4— Penn St. (11) 8 

6 — Southern Cal _ 8 

6— U.C.L.A. 8 

7— Missouri 8 1 

8 — Notre Dame 7 1 

9 — Tennessee 7 1 

10— Louisiana St. 8 1 

11— Auburn 7 2 

12— Michigan 7 2 

18— Mississippi 8 3 

14— Stanford 6 2 

16 — Florida 1 1 

16 — Nebraska ._ 7 2 

17— Purdue 7 2 

18— Weat Virginia 



ly, thus influencing their future 
decisions concerning draft 
choices. Buckeye players, of 
course, will be denied this critical 
exposure. 

Perhaps Buckeye flanker Jan 



T Pta. 
786 



685 

6se 

556 
416 
860 
362 
1 2*4 
249 
240 
214 



.... 8 1 



19 — Houston 6 

20— Toledo .....,..._ 9 



119 
110 
88 
67 
43 
37 
29 
20 
6 



Editor's note; 



(Continued from page 8) 

budget of nearly $3.5 million. 
This would seem to add weight 
to the cry of the school-spirited 
and fair-play criers. 

Bowdoin, though in a different 
financial booklet, likewise suffers 
from the inadequacies of the ar- 
chaic league rulings, and last sea- 
son's hockey team was a prime 
example of not receiving credit 
where credit was due. After ris- 
ing to the number one position 
in their ECAC college division, 
the squad was prohibited from 
playing in post-season champion- 
ship playoffs which could . have 
given them official status. A 
clause in the Pentagonal prevents 
post-season play in hockey. This 
is a new season, and the fight will 
be led once again, or so it is 



Swimming Potential 'Great' 



(Continued from page 8) 

Springfield in the Curtis pool. 
For the remainder of the semes- 
ter, the squad leaves Brunswick 
only twice, with the bulk of the 
road trips coming after inter 
session. 

Captain John Spencer, who was 
down in the 5:20's for his 500 time 
last season, had some comments 
from his landlocked position; "I 
guess I'm really looking forward 
to a successful season, though we 
are going to have to work hard to 
make it a really good one. Our 
real potential for success lies in 



KENNEBEC FRUIT 

Sunday Papers 

New York Times 

Boston Herald Traveler 

Rampage 



the development of the stronger 
members of the sophomore class 
and their potential to fill out our 
shallower spots — that is, our 
depth should come from them. 
I'm really anxious to get into the 
water myself, and Doc Hanley 
keeps telling me I'll have that 
much more fresh incentive to 
swim come December, as I will 
not have been in for the month 
and a half the rest of the squad 
has. 

,fr The meets we'll really be 
shooting for will be those against 
MIT and Amherst. With MIT, I'd 
say it's a matter of revenge for 
last year, and Amherst is more 
the continuing competition. We've 
pretty evenly split our meets with 
them in past seasons, and I would 
like to see us defeat them two in 
a row. Springfield is our first 
meet, and they perennially have a 
really strong squad. 



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White assessed the situation best 
when he said, "If we're Number 
One, why won't they let us prove 
it to everybody?" 



COACHES' POLL 
FOOTBALL RATINGS 

By United Pre»» International 

The Top 20, points figured on 
a 20-18-16-14-12-10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2 
1 basis for first through 20th 
places (first-place votes in paren- 
theses) and won-lost-tied records. 

W L T Pts. 

1— Ohio State (38) 8 848 

2— Texaa (2) 8 805 

3— Penn State _... 8 228 

4— Arkansas 8 218 

5— Southern California 8 1 188 

6— Missouri 8 1 174 

7— U.C.L.A. : 8 1 168 

8— Louisiana State 8 1 92 

9— Notre Dame 7 I 1 71 

10 — Tennessee - 7 1 49 

11— Auburn ...» 7 2 S3 

12— Michigan _„ 7 2 22 

13— Mississippi ..... 6 3 18 

14— Stanford 6 2 1 17 

15— Houston 6 2 6 

16— Florida > 7 11 4 

17— Purdue -... 7 2 4 

18— Georgia .'. 6 8 1 8 

19— Nebraska 7 t • S 





ROWING. Lee Rowe gets off the ground early In the season. 

Rowe Breaks Five College 
Soccer Scoring Records 

While Girma Ashmeron was pacing the frosh with his Olym- 
pic style, a quieter figure on the varsity left his name five times 
in the college record books. Lee Rowe, senior letterman and 

center fullback, broke five scoring and point records in his final 

Bowdoin season. 

Rowe's hat trick against Maine 
gave him the record for the most 
goals in a game. These, added 
onto five previous season scores, 
also handed him the record for 
most goals in a season. His eight, 
topped previous record holder 
Bill Barthelman's six goals made 
in 1962. Rowe's 16 career goals 
also gave him that record, topping 
the previous mark of 11 set from 
1966-68 by Bill Williams. 

Point-wise, Rowe grabbed two 
records. Tallying ten points this 
season with eight goals and two 
assists, he surpassed the old rec- 
ord by two set in 1963 by Joe 
Giesler. Rowe's career total was 
21, seven points higher than the 
old record of 14 set by Dave 
Mather from 1965-67. 



Hoopmen Led 



HARDY HARDIES. Hockey co-captains, Erland (center) aad Steve 
Hardy, with Coach Sid Watson. The icemen edged Providence, 6-5, in 
an overtime scrimmage last night and face that team again this after- 
noon. Last weekend, the Bear squad scrimmaged Salem State, and 
won, 7-6. 



By Chip Miller 

(Continued from page 8) , 

have many returning players and 
show both speed and excellent ball 
control. These teams, however, 
are not encountered until Febru- 
ary, by which time, both experi- 
ence and momentum will have 
had time to develop. 



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STAMP COLLECTORS 

If you collect the stamps of ISRAEL, let me quote you lowest prices by return mail 
on any you need; no lists or approvals. , 



O. T. BLANC 

Clarks Cove. Walpole, Maine 



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PAGE EIGHT 



( 
THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1969 



Swim Captain Casted; 
Team Fills Out Role ' 



The cast around varsity swimming captain John Spencer's 
fractured wrist will impede his swimming efforts until at least 
Christmas, but the opportunities for the rest of the team's suc- 
cess remain unbounded. The squad boasts six returning letter- 
men from last year's twelve man 



well as one All-Ameri- 
nine promising sopho- 



team, as 
can and 
mores. 

Ken Ryan leads the swimming 
prospects this year, after landing 
an Ail-American title in the 200 
I.M. last March. His versatility in 
events will lend depth to the 
squad where they might be shal- 
low. One of the leading sopho- 
more swimmers is Pete Robinson, 
who managed to break nearly 
every one of the Bowdoin fresh- 
man swimming records last sea- 
son. 

Leading the distance men 
once his cast is off, will be cap- 
tain Rick Spencer who made the 
consolations in the Mile at last 
years New England Swimming 
Championships. Filling the dis- 
tance spots until his return will 
be junior Marty Friedlander and 
sophomores Tom Progin and Bow 
Quinn. In addition to the middle 
distance 200 Freestyle and the 
long distance 500, the team anti- 
cipates the addition of a'1000 Yard 
Freestyle in the meets with 
Springfield, UNH, U Mass, and 
possibly other schools. 

In the shorter freestyle events, 
junior Parker Barnes will be set- 
ting the pace in the 200 and 100 
Yard events. Also under two 
minutes in the 200 are Peter Rob- 
inson and Bow Quinn. Other 
sprinters are Jeff Meehan, Simon 
Edkins, Jim- Waltzer, and Tom 
Rice. 

In the butterfly, senior letter- 
man' Barry Stevens, last year's 
freshman record holder, Pete 
Robinson, and junior Gary Beem 
will be filling the spots. Quinn 
has also been working out with 
the fly. John McPhillips and 
John Wizbicki will swim the 
breaststroke events, and Mark 
Detering will join Ken Ryan in 
the Individual Medley. Senior 
letterman Bob Stuart will hold 
down the backstroke events and 
John Wendler will be working 
the diving boards as well as 
swimming in the final freestyle 
relay. Tom Progin will dive for 
points, too. 

The squad has their first test 
December 6 when they meet 
(Please turn to page 7) 



1 Swimming, 


'69 


•70 


VARSITY SWIMMING 




Coach: Charles 


J. Butt 




Capt.: John S. 


Spencer 




Manager : Mark 


Levine 




Dec. 






6 Springfield 




H 2:00 


13 Massachusetts . 




H 2:00 


Jan. 






10 New Hampshire 




A 2:00 


13 MIT 




A 8:30 


17 Williams 




H 2:00 


Feb. 






7 Wesleyan 




A 2:00 


14 Connecticut 




H 2:00 


21 Trinity 




A 2:00 


28 Amherst 




A 2:00 


Mar. 






7 Tufts 




H 2:00 


12, 13, 14 New England's 


at Springfield 


19. 20, 21 NCAA College Div. at Oakland, 


Mich. 






FRESHMAN SWIMMING 


Coach: Charles 


I. Butt 




Dec. 






6 Springfield 




H 3: *• 


13 Huntington Prep 




H 12: N 


Jan. 






10 New Hampshire 




A 3:30 


13 MIT 




A 6:30 


14 Deering & Hebron at Portland Y 


Feb. 






11 Brunswick 




H 4:00 


IX Hebron 




A 


25 Portland 




H 2:00 


28 Exeter 




H 4:00 


Mar. 






7 Tufts 




H 3:30 


12. 13. 14 New Englands 


at Springfield 


VARSITY SQUASH 




Coach: Edwan 


Reid 




Capt.: Bruce E 


Cain 




Dec. 






10 Harvard "B" 




H 4:00 


fi Williams 




A 4:00 


7 Wesleyan 




A 2:00 


ZO Trinity 




A 4:00 


II Aashwst 




A ItM 




—Hoop Season Opens; — 
UNH Road Trip Dec. 1 



By BRIAN DAVIS 

Bowdoin's fifteen-man varsity basketball squad met official- 
ly for the first time this year on November first. Of those present, 
there were four returning lettermen; Chip Miller, captain and 

senior, and three juniors , Steve 



Basketball, '69-70 



VARSITY BASKETBALL 

Coach: Ray S. Bicknell 

Captain: Richard C. Miller 

Manager: Neil Hamlin 



BALL BOUNCER. Varsity bas- 
ketball captain, "Chip" Miller. 

Miller will lead his squad 
against New Hampshire Decem- 
ber first in Durham for the sea- 
son's first official encounter. . 



1 New Hampshire 


A 8:00 


6 Amherst 




H 7:30 


13 Wesleyan 


. 


A 7:30 


16 MIT 




H 8:00 


Jan. 






2-3 Tournament 


At Centra 




College 




10 WPI 




A 8:00 


14 Colby 


• 


A 7:30 


It Brandeis 




A 4:00 


17 Williams 




H 4:00 


Feb. 






6 Coast Guard 




H 7:30 


7 Middlebury 




H 3:00 


11 Bates 




H 7:30 


14 Tufts 




H 4:00 


18 Maine 




H 7:30 


20 Trinity 




A 8:15 


21 Springfield 




A 4:00 


23 Bates 




A 8:15 


28 Colby 




H 7:30 


Mar. 






5 Maine 




A 7:35 


FRESHMAN BASKETBALL 


Coach : Edmund L. 


Coombs 


Dec. 






1 New Hampshire 


A 6:00 


10 MCI 




H 4:00 


13 Exeter 




H 3:00 


16 MIT 




H 6:00 


Jan. 






10 Andover 


* 


A 4:00 


14 Colby 




A 5:30 


17 Gorham 




A 6:30 


Feb. 






11 Bates 




H 5:30 


18 Maine 




H 5:30 


25 Bates 




A 6:15 


28 Colby 




■» H 5:30 


Mar. 






i Maine < 




A fiU 





DEADWEIGHT. Welghtllftlng team captain Rick Spill 
manipulates 475 lbs. (See article in next Orient.) 



(left) deadllfts 505 lbs. as John Benson (right) 



Carey, John McGlellan, and John 
Walker. The relatively young 
squad boasts only one other se- 
nior, Rollie Ives. This means that 
only a third of the team has had 
any experience on the varsity 
competition level. 

Coach Ray Bicknell, however, 
expects a better than .500 season 
from this year's team. Among the 
major strengths of the Bears is 
their rebounding and general 
"board" power. The back court, 
while far from being in bad shape, 
will miss last year's captain, Bobo 
McFarland '69, who is the highest 
scoring player in Bowdoin's his- 
tory as well as Maine's Athlete of 
the Year last season. 

To overcome this loss and inex- 
perience, fast breaks are being 
perfected during practice ses- 
sions. Defensively, the Bears are 
staying with their "man-to-man." 
Several players have expressed 
concern over a possible "slow 
start" this year, but others feel 
that the team will gather momen- 
tum in their first two games. 

The opening game against the 
University of New Hampshire on 
December 1 (at U.N.H.) is ex- 
pected to create the usual open- 
ing game 'psyche' factor that will 
spark the team. The first home 
contest with Amherst on Decem- 
ber 6 should have the same effect 
/ augmented by the loss to the Lord 
Jeffs last season that was one of 
the few mars oh the Bears' 16 and 
5 record. 

As for preseason competition, 
the squad has scrimmaged two 
teams. In both cases the Bears 
tied their opponents by winning 
two of the four scrimmage peri- 
ods. The teams encountered thus 
far are Gorham State and Dale- 
housie of Nova Scotia. Tomorrow, 
the Husson College team is sched- 
uled for a scrimmage on the Mor- 
rell floor at 2:00. 

The other concern of this year's 
team is the Maine State Series, of 
which Bowdoin is the two year de- 
fending champion. Maine, as al- 
ways, is big, but this has been 
dealt with in the past. Of greater 
worry are the Colby Mules who 

(Please turn to page 7) 



Football Bowl Time Approaches . . . 



Yet, No Play For Top-Rated OSU 



Orient Sport* Analysis 
By BILL FINK 

Can anyone beat Ohio State? 

Throughout the 1969 collegiate football 
season, this question has become increas- 
ingly pertinent as Woody Hayes' gridiron 
powerhouse has proceeded to systematical- 
ly annihilate all opposition and continual- 
ly sport an 8-0 record during nine weeks 
of play. 

The nation's number one college team 
fittingly leads all rivals from the stand- 
point of offensive and defensive statistics, 
scoring an average of 45.7 points per 
game while yielding a mere 7.8 points. 
Many distinguished college coaches, 
among them Ara Parseghian of Notre 
Dame, Duffy Daugherty of Michigan State, 
and Tommy Prothro of UCLA are con- 
vinced that this year's Buckeye squad is 
one of the best in college football history, 
rating them with the best of Knute 
Rockne's Notre Dame squads of the 
1920's. Prothro further stated that as 
many as five Buckeyes are deserving of 
All-American honors this year; quarter- 
back Rex Kern, fullback Jim Otis, flanker 
Jan White, split end Ron Janckowski, and 
cornerman Jim Tatum. 

Yet, as strange as it may seem, Ohio 



State's only defeat in 1969 will not origi- 
nate from any mistakes made on the foot- 
ball field, but rather from the archaic and 
illogical rules governing Big Ten Confer- 
ence and NCAA post-season play. Thus, 

Editor's Note: 



though Ohio State will undoubtedly cap- 
ture their second consecutive national and 
Big Ten Championships, they will be 
barred from this year's Rose Bowl contest 
(traditionally a match between the Big 



The fighting Irish, the losing bear 



By MARTIN FRIEDLANDER 
Orient Sports Editor 

At this point, there are a few sidelights, 
which might prove interesting within the 
context of this article. The first pertains 
to Notre Dame's appearance in the Cotton 
Bowl this year — that school's first bowl 
appearance in 45 years . . . the first ap- 
pearance since the legendary Four Horse- 
men of the Fighting Irish defeated Stam- 
ford 27-10 in the Rose Bowl on New 
Year's day of 1925. After that, the Notre 
Dame authorities were fearful that too 
frequent appearances in similar post- 
season contests would taint the academic 
image of their revered institution of high- 



er learning. Thus, the college imposed a 
ban on post season play. What they failed 
to do was cut back on the athletic expen- 
ditures which eventually gave added 
weight to the demand for a lifting of the 
ban. Finally, this year, with the promise 
of a quarter million dollars for the ap- 
pearance in the bowl game and the spi- 
ritual cheers of students, faculty, and 
alumni, the authorities gave way, and the 
Fighting Irish had the opportunity due 
them for their athletic efforts during the 
season. Ohio State, though in a different 
rules category, likewise suffers from fi- 
nancial pressures with an annual athletic 

(Please turn to page 7) 



Ten and Pacific Eight champions) on the 
basis of a conference ruling prohibiting 
consecutive appearances to that game. 
The Buckeyes also will not be allowed to 
participate in any other bowl games, as 
an NCAA ruling prohibits post-season ap- 
pearances by team who have failed to se- 
cure bowl bids for the particular game as- 
signed to their conference. 

The national rules are unfair and illo- 
gical for a number of reasons. For one 
thinp, they deny the traditional sports 
premise that the best team should receive 
full recognition. For instance, though 
Ohio State has defeated every Big Ten 
opponent it has faced thus far, it will 
undoubtedly be one of the "second best" 
as billed against those actually playing in 
the Rose Bowl. 

Secondly, in an age of television and 
tremendous fan interest in the game, the 
absence of the national number one team 
in a post season bowl could present dis- 
maying results. For example, a Rose Bowl 
encounter pitting say, Southern California 
or UCLA against Michigan State or Pur- 
due (both of which OSU defeated han- 
dily) would probably generate as much 
interest viewer as re-runs of the Gale 
Storm show. 

(Please turn to page 7) 



V" 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 



VOLUME XCIX 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK. MAINE. FRIDAY. DECEMBER 5. 1969 



NUMBER 9 



SAT Is Made Optional; 
Humanization The Key 



(Editor's Not*: The following statement issued by the 
Office of Admissions, has been sent to secondary schools 
throughout the nation.) 
A New Option . . . 

The Faculty of Bowdoin College has voted to 
eliminate the College Board examination require- 
ment for admissions candidates. Effective immedi- 
ately for applicants to the Class of 1974. the sub- 
mission of CEEB-SAT and Achievement Test scores 
to the College is optional. 

For many years Bowdoin has required College 
Board scores and has found them a helpful leaven- 
ing factor when considering one candidate in the 
context of an entire applicant group. For one thing, 
the scores have provided a degree of relief in the 
complex task of interpreting transcripts. (Although 
Bowdoin has always given priority to the record of 
secondary school performance in an admissions de- 
cision, there is considerable uncertainty in compar- 
ing one secondary school's B+ to the next school's 
B+, and within the same school, one teacher's A — 
to the next teacher's A — .) Also, the CEEB scores 
have provided a valuable point of reference for in- 
terpreting in-school performance patterns. For ex- 
ample, they help to identify an under-achiever or 
over-achiever. For these and other reasons, College 
Board scores have been and will continue to be an 
important element in the total assessment of a col- 
lege candidate. 

But times and values change, and so must em- 
phases. Today, as Bowdoin searches for students of 
widely diverse backgrounds who best combine in- 
tellectual vigor with the rather intangible charac- 
teristics of daring and discipline, sensitivity and 
purpose, the value of standardized test scores comes 
into question. Bowdoin's move to optional College 
Boards perhaps symbolizes a necessary examina- 
tion of tradition in admissions procedures. 
The Personalisation Process . . . 

Bowdoin is a small college where the individual is 
central. Since the Admissions Office is adequately 
staffed to make a careful review of a transcript 
plus a series of recommendations on a single candi- 
date, performance and promise are judged as much 
on description as on statistics. The candidate is 
evaluated in terms of where he has been, and at 
what pace and with what resolve he is going. Stand- 
ardized test scores can contribute to this evalua- 
tion, but they must play a background role, and are 
not indispensable. 

The educational process is improved by person- 
alization — and admissions play an important role 
in the educational process. As the lecture gives way 
to seminar and independent study, and as highly 
structured grading systems give way to No Rank 
and Pass/Fail, so must the evaluation of a college 
candidate become less encumbered with scores and 
formulas, and concentrate more on the appraisal of 
those human qualities which cannot be measured by 
standardized tests, but which nonetheless are pred- 
icators of success in a particular institution of 
learning and in a particular area of contribution 
thereafter. An undergraduate editorial in the Brown 
University Daily Herald says it well : "The changing 
nature of education . . . and the increasing involve- 
ment of students in socio-political movements makes 
it essential now that the entire range of admissions 
be reexamined . . . The challenges of the new curri- 
culum and the proposed modification in the overall' 
atmosphere of intellectual life . . . bring into focus 
the importance of attracting and accepting a highly 
creative, highly motivated class of students." And 
Eugene Wilson, Dean of Admissions at Amherst 
College, brings the point into closer focus by dis- 
cussing tests: "Aptitude Test scores at their best 
predict marks and are validated by marks; but 
neither marks nor test scores are reliable indicators 
of the ability to think or reason. Test scores do not 
guarantee the pressence of those human qualities 
and intellectual abilities we value most." 

Many colleges, including Bowdoin, have failed in 
their attempts to communicate to candidates, 
schools, and parents the relatively subordinate role 



cf College Board results in the admissions process. 
Although most colleges emphasize that actual school 
performance and personal accomplishment are the 
key factors, candidates too often estimate their 
chances for admission to College X by comparing 
their CEEB scores with that college's SAT medians. 
Also, the quality of College X's entering class is too 
often judged purely in terms of these medians, even 
though the admissions committee passed up many 
high-scoring candidates for others with lower test 
scores, but stronger overall records. To illustrate, 
here is a chart of Bowdoin's Class of 1973 admis- 
sions decisions, related to CEEB-SATs : 
SAT-VERBAL 





No. Applied 


% Accepted 


750-800 


24 


58.3 


700-749 


116 


59.6 


650-699 


267 


41.6 


600-649 


* 332 


32.8 


550-599 


401 


23.7 


500-549 


262 


14.5 


450-499 


1% 


13.3 


400-449 


78 


29.5 


350-399 


32 


12.5 


300-349 


9 


33.3 


250-299 


2 


0.0 


200-249 


1 
SAT-MATH 


0.0 




No. Applied 


% Accepted 


750-800 


95 


60.0 


700-749 


219 


45.2 


650-699 


387 


34.9 


600-649 


384 


22.9 


550-599 


298 


18.8 


500-549 


181 


17.7 


450-499 


91 


9.9 


400-449 


44 


31.8 


350-399 


12 


8.3 


300-349 


3 


33.3 


250-299 


5 


0.0 


200-249 


1 


0.0 



Bowdoin's decision to make College Board tests 
optional represents, for one thing, an attempt to 
underscore our interest in the highly-motivated 
student, whatever the level of test scores. We want 
the avid student to apply even though his SAT me- 
dians may not compare favorably with those of 
Bowdoin when last recorded (for the Class of '73, 
V-611, M-662). On the other hand, we will not inter- 
pret the absence of test scores as a certain indica- 
tion the student performed poorly. Some applicants 
may wish to refrain from submitting their scores as 
a matter of principle. 

There is widespread feeling and convincing evi- 
dence today that standardized aptitude and achieve- 
ment tests cannot escape cultural bias and that they 
thereby tend to work in favor of the more advan- 
taged elements of our society, while handicapping 
others. Bowdoin is eager to continue its tradition 
of educating a high number of low income and mi- 
nority students. We wish to avoid requiring from 
any individual evidence which might be inherently 
misleading. 

Bowdoin is also eager to give the student who 
performs poorly on tests, habitually or on a given 
occasion, the option of resting his case for admis- 
sion on the school record and teacher recommenda- 
tions. 

It has often been assumed that College Board 
scores correlate well with performance patterns in 
college. Recent studies at Bowdoin have prompted 
us to question this assumption. Analysis is difficult, 
however, largely because our own definition of 
"success at the College" is constantly broadening, 
and cannot be stated simply in terms of grades and 
rank. But even if one concentrates on numerical in- 
dications of success or failure at Bowdoin, results 
warn against over-confidence in the predictive value 
of standardized test scores. For example: 

1. Of the Bowdoin students who graduated Cum 
Laude, Magna Cum Laude or Summa Cum 
Laude in the Classes of 1968 and 1969, only 
(Pie est turn to pace t) 



Can Mr. Everything 
Make It At Bowdoin? 



Seventy-nine applicants have 
been selected under the Early 
Decision program for the Class of 
1974. The first third of the in- 
coming class was chosen from 
two hundred and forty appli- 
cants; this was a forty per cent 
increase in Early Decision can- 
didates over last year. 

According to Director of Ad- 
missions Richard Moll, "There 
are marked differences in the 
backgrounds, talents, and ambi- 
tions of the successful seventy- 
nine candidates. Yet, in terms of 
raw human qualities the seventy- 
nine ED's are strikingly similar. 
The ED's are bright, sensitive, 
and eager. To a man, they ap- 
pear to have performed to capa- 
city in school. 'Hardworking,' 
'Gives 200%,' and 'determined' 
are phrases which cropped up 
again and again in the teacher 
recommendations of those ad- 
mitted. Bright laggards did not 
gain entry, nor did shallow 
grade-grabbers. ' ' 

Moll said those selected have 
the same diversity as last year's 
Early Decision students, but they 
also have better academic rec- 
ords. They were selected on the 
basis of class rank, grades, and 
recommendations. Some of the 
candidates did not submit SAT 
scores, which are no longer re- 
quired. 

The Early Decision admittees 
come from 21 states and coun- 
tries. 64% are from New Eng- 
land, 36% from the rest of the 
nation. Moll explained that the 
complete Class of 1974 will have 
a larger delegation from outside 
of New England, because Early 

Lucet To Be 
Bowdoin Guest 

His Excellency Charles Lucet, 
Ambassador of France to the 
United States, will be the guest 
of honor at a reception Monday, 
December 8. 

President Roger Howell, Jr., 
members of the Faculty, students 
of French, members of the Col- 
lege's Franco-American Society, 
and others have been invited to 
attend the reception, which will 
be held at 10 a.m. in the Col- 
lege's Senior Center. 

Mr. Lucet has been French 
Ambassador since 1965. He was 
previously Director of Political 
Affairs for the Foreign Affairs 
Ministry from 1959 to 1966, and 
was Minister Plenipotentiary at 
the French Embassy in Washing- 
ton for four years prior to that. 

Ambassador Lucet was his 
country's alternate delegate to 
the United Nations from 1958 to 
1966, and served as Deputy Chief 
of Cultural Relations in Paris 
from 1960 to 1958. 

He has also served as Counsel- 
lor to the French legation at 
Beirut and to the French Em- 
bassy in Cairo, First Secretary at 
the Embassy in Ankara, Deputy 
Chief of Middle East Affairs in 
Paris, and First Secretary at the 
French Embassy in Washington. 



Decision candidates tend to be 
from the nearby area more than 
regular candidates. 

68% of the admitted ED's cur- 
rently attend public school, 32% 
private school. There are seven 
Bowdoin sons in the group. Ex- 
actly half of the group will come 
to Bowdoin on scholarship. 

The following statement con- 
cerning the class was issued by 
the Office of Admissions. 

"Perhaps the most revealing 
way to tell about the "ED's as a 
group is to describe some repre- 
sentative admittees who most 
clearly demonstrate the traits we 
were seeking: 

The Classic Plugger: A boy 
from a Maine preparatory school 
surely demonstrates the will to 
win. His size (5' 2", 120 lbs.) 
did not prevent him from playing 
ruard on the school's football 
team, a good team, at that. He 
was not a star player; in fact the 
coach told the boy he was simply 
too small to play and that it was 
dangerous. He played anyway. 
He is a top wrestler in his weight 
class (118 lbs.). He has been ex- 
tremely involved in town youth 
organizations. He hails from 
Kentucky. His energy and drive 
earned him top respect in- the 
school and a place in the Class 
of '74. 

Mr. Everything: A top scholar 
from a large Boston area high 
school. This boy is valedictorian 
in a class of 800, won the Har- 
vard Book Prize given to the 
outstanding junior boy, plays 
trumpet in a rock blues band, 
has won numerous physics and 
Latin awards and, through it all, 
works 12 hours a week in a drug 
store as a stock clerk. 

The All- American Boy: Presi- 
dent of his class of 700 during 
both his junior and senior years, 
Captain of 3 sports (Soccer, 
Hockey and Baseball), and top 
16% of his class. Chased by sev- 
eral Ivy League schools but se- 
lected Bowdoin for its personal 
atmosphere. 

The American Dream: A boy 

of Russian parentage now in pre- 
paratory school in New York. He 
is President of the Russian Club, 
President of the Varsity Club 
and President of the. Boys Ath- 
letic Association. He is Captain 
of Soccer and Track, and Photog- 
raphy Editor of the Newspaper 
and the Yearbook. Most impor- 
tant, he has overcome language 
problems (Russian is spoken in 
the home) to become a writer of 
promise. For example, part of 
his application essay reads: 

"Our attitudes towards girls 
will always bring back a smile. 
How superior and strong we were 
(although I do recall a girl hand- 
ing a fine licking to one of us.) 
What name-calling we resorted 
to even though we were not seri- 
ous in the least. For a certain 
reason, girls always seemed 
smarter and we couldn't under- 
stand why. We did have secret 
admirations but we wouldn't 
dare make our emotions obvious. 
How naive and adorable youth 
is." 



PAGE TWO 



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B e a r Si r: ■ ■ . -T ■ y ■ 

Your editorial in the Friday, November 7th, issue 
of the Orient grieves me deeoly. As the father of 
two sons of military age, oneSon of whom is a se- 
nior at Bowdoin College, I want to end the war the 
same as all intelligent people in the world today. 
My senior son at Bowdoin will receive his second 
lieutenant's commission in the United States Army 
in June of 1970, so, naturally, I too want to stop 
this war in Vietnam as soon as possible, or any 
other wars that might be in the. making I want to 
get stopped. 

Our government believes we have the best sources 
of information and the best advisors in the world 
tcday supplying President Nixon with the facts he 
needs to get us out of that awful Vietnam war. 
President Nixon has the knowledge, he has the 
wisdom, and he has the courage to make the right 
decisions — and not necessarily the most popular 
decisions. Presidents Truman, Eisenhower, Ken- 
nedy, Johnson, and now Nixon have all felt that we 
and our allies must help the South Vietnamese de- 
fend themselves until they are strong enough to de- 
fend themselves by themselves. These five United 
States presidents, of both parties, have believed 
that the communist will seek domination in the 
world by attacking a supposed weak spot through 
trickery, propoganda, bluster, and violence. Each 
time the United States has reacted, with the help 
of allies, to block them from achieving an easy vic- 
tory — and we have done it without resorting to 
that horror of horrors — all out total war. 

The communist tried a blockade in Berlin, ter- 
rorism in Greece, conventional warfare in Korea. In 
each instance, we stopped it. In Cuba they tested us 
to see if we were prepared to go to nuclear war, and 
found t?hat we were. Now, we're being tested again. 
As with Berlin, Greece, Korea, and Cuba, Vietnam 
-is— a-proving- ground. This-is flo-simple civil war 
fought solely by the patriots, although there cer- 
tainly are patriots on both sides. It is in essence a 
laboratory experiment executed with callous, dis- 
regard for human life by those in Hanoi and Peking 
who want to see if the protracted war theories of 
Mao Tse-Tung will work. History, I believe, will 
judge that along side of Berlin, Greece, Cuba and 
Korea, Vietnam was one of our finest hours. We 
did not flinch. Or, it will say that the communist 
are right and history will belong to them. 

As I read your editorial again, I have to conclude 
that I know a lot more about being young than you 
do about being old. I am proud of the 50 years I have 
spent in this United States of America and I am 
proud to have supported the duly elected president 
of the government of our country, whether it was 
a party of my choice or not. 

It seems to me there's a lot of things that are 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1969 

wrong in this country that my fathers and your 
fathers and our fathers* fathers before them have 
caused to be wrong in this country. Vietnam is not ' 
the only bad situation we have to cope with. Think 
of the problems and the two million people that 
have died of cancer during this four years of the 
Vietnam war, think of the slaughters on our high- 
ways to the tune of 50 or 60 thousand per year, 
think of the pollution in our streams and in the 
air that is occurring. 

Why, if you youths are so brilliant and your wis- 
dom so great, why are you picking on this question , 
of the Vietnam war, and secondly using your great 
wisdom to dictate how our universities and educa- 
tional systems should be run? How come you don't 
embark on a program to run General Motors? or 
du Pont? or United States Steel? What gives you 
the right to believe that your wisdom is so much 
greater in relationship to the Vietnam problem than 
it is to all the other complicated problems facing 
my future and yours in the years to come? 

In the last paragraph of your editorial you seem 
indignant that Nixon has tried to get the people of 
the United State knowledgeable of his plans to end 
the war. What do you expect him to do? Sit there 
and do nothing, or just fall over and listen to the 
uninformed views of the various pressure groups 
that cannot begin to have the sources of informa- 
tion for decision making that he, the President, has 
at his fingertips to lead us out of that hellhole in 
Vietnam. 

This United States of our is a great, great coun- 
try and history will prove, and has proved, that our 
present form of government is the best the world 
has even seen in the history of mankind. I propose 
that all we citizens do all in our power to support 
this great government and help the government 
solve its problems. When the duly elected repre- 
sentatives fail us, then, in an orderly, constitutional 
method you vote them out of office. It seems to me 
the editor of a newspaper should not be trying to 
inflame the issues against the administration. 



Our president, and our government, need our help 
and support for this Vietnam policy — the closer 
we appear to have a united front, the sooner and 
tetter the settlement of the Vietnam war — for all 
concerned. 

Your editorial gave a backhand to Vice President 
Agnew. who daily is growing in stature with the 
"silent majority" who feel that the Vice President's 
comments have been long overdue. It is about time 
that somebody came out and stated clearly the ad- 
ministration's rebuttal to the hogwash that is being 
peddled by many of the pressure groups of this na- 
tion. 

Support your government! It's the best in the 

world. 

Very truly yours, 
LEONARD C. BARR 



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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1969 

Optional SATs . . . 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE THREE 



(Continued from page 1) 



31% had entered the College with both SAT's 
above their class medians, while 24% had en- 
_ tered the College with both SAT's below their 
class medians. (The incoming class medians 
wv -e V-605 M-658 for '68, and V-610 and M-650 
for 69.) In both of these classes, averaging 
250 men, at least one student graduated with 
Latin Honors whose SAT's were both below 
500. In the Class of 1969, one man graduated 
Cum Laude who had entered Bowdoin with a 
Verbal of 475 and a Math of 386. 

2. In an Admissions Office poll of the Bowdoin 
faculty, professors were asked to list the names 
cf recent students who were the best represen- 
tatives of the qualities Bowdoin should be most 
eager to attract, and also ". . , those students 
you have taufeht during the last few years who 
are models of what Bowdoin could do with- 
out." In profiling both groups as they had en- 
tered Bowdoin from secondary schools, statis- 
tics regarding Collece Board tests were par- 
ticularly interesting: for example, 50% of the 
"models of what we can do without" had en- 
tered College scoring above their class median ; 
on the SAT-V, and 65% of the same group 
entered Bowdoin scoring above their class me- 
dian on the SAT-M. 

"Correct Interpretation" is the key to maximum 
usefulness of standardized test scores in the evalu- 
ation of college candidates. However, uniformly cor- 
rect interpretation by candidates and their fami- 
lies, school counselors, admissions officers and fac- 
ulty committees, is almost too much to hope for. In 
many cases the scores can mislead, and the candi- 
date would be better served by their absence from 
the admissions folder. 

What are those human qualities, many of them 
immeasurable by aptitude and achievement tests, 
which Bowdoin prizes most in the undergraduate? 
. . . The answer diffejs from one spokesman to the 
next. One professor said recently: "The common 
denominator of our class should be the individuals' 
willingness to walk to a different drummer." An- 
other said: "We need students who are interesting 



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We've Got What YOU Want 

142 Maine Street 



in many different ways, but who have in common 
intellectual capacity, curiosity with an associated 
willingness to investigate, a rebel instinct only if 
Jhfiy offer supp orting ev idence when levying charges 
against society, and the ambition and motivation to 
i lake something cf themselves and the world." But 
another member of the faculty cautioned: "We 
want students who are not sick with sterile super- 
imagination. We need men who will not shine by 
striving for a desperate originality. They will be- 
come leaders in fields that are demanding, fields 
that a mere talker cannot master. We must re- 
member that originality is the most easily faked of 
all character qualities. To my mind the most use- 
'ess student is the glib fellow who makes a good 
impression when you talk to him, but who cannot 
apply himself and thus exploit constructively any 
god qualities he might have." Finally, a professor 
wh^ was given a Bowdoin honorary degree at the 
insistence of the outgoing senior class advised : 
"Avoid the pseudo-sophisticated who are just too 
hoity-toity to be open-minded or learn anything, 
and whose loir* suit is a snobbish contempt; and 
avoid the deliberate and malicious troublemaker, in 
contrast to the boy who is awkwardly and painful- 
ly trying to find himself, and who, in the process, 
keeps bumping into people and regulations (the lat- 
ter we should welcome in small numbers). Favor 
many different types cf men, but always ask: What 
might this student, with luck and wisdom on the 
part of Bowdcin, contribute to the College? And 
nlso, What might Bowdoin, with all its assets and 
liabilities, contribute to this lad's total education? 

Bowdoin considers admissions a match-making 
process: our College is not necessarily right for 
every good student, and every good student is not 
necessarily right for Bowdoin. The College is search- 
ing fcr the best potential for this community, and 
for those who indicate promise of becoming the 
most enlightened, responsible contributors to the 
Common Gcod thereafter. College Board scores 
have traditionally played an important role in our 
search. The majority of the College's candidates 
will probably continue to send their College Board 
scores; we will welcome them, and will put them to 
gccd use. Some applicants may choose to state their 
case for admission on what they consider to be more 
relevant data. At Bowdoin, this is now their option. 

THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



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X 



PAGE POUR 



THE BOWDCMN ORIENT 



J 



Weightlifting club returns.^ 



r 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5. 1969 



UNH Literally 



Adds Insult 



After Eight Years, Team's Rejuvenated To j^ 



Although the newly formed 
Bowdoin Weightlifting Club 
does not number among its 
rank Hercules, Atlas, or even 
Mr. America, it does list enthu- 
siastic members that track 
coach Frank Sabasteanski in- 
sists are "hard-core." 

The club, captained and or- 
ganized by senior Rick Spill, and 
advised by Mr. Karl Magyar of. 
the Government Department, is 
returning to intercollegiate com- 
petition after an absence of eight 
years. 

The season opens this Satur- 
day as the Bear weightmen trav- 
el to Cambridge to face an ex- 
perienced MIT team. The follow- 
ing Sunday. the squad will face 
the state-champion Lisbon Bar- 
bell Club and a powerful team 
from the Brunswick Naval Air 
Station in a triangular" meet that 
promises to be a record-breaking 
one. The meet has been arranged 
to give the new Bowdoin team 
an opportunity to shoot for some 
of the recently established Maine 
state records in the povverlifts, 
bench press, squat, and deadlift. 
In fact, one Bowdoin lifter,- soph- 
omore Ray Bouchard, already 
owns three state records as well 
as the state championship in the 
132 lb. class. 

Club adviser Magyar holds the 
Novice Bench Press Record in 
the Maryland 132 lb. class and he 
has unofficially surpassed the 
listed Maine record for that 
event. Doug Sewall, a newcomer 
to weightlifting, has shown great 
potential in the bench press, al- 
ready exceeding the Maine State 
record in practice by (>5 lbs. af- 
ter a scant three months of lift- 
ing. It is expected that team cap- 
tain Spill, who finished third in 
the 1H1 lb. class in the recent 
State Powerliiting Champion- 
ships, will move up to the 198 lb. 



class and establish new markers 
in the squat, deadlifi, and total. 
John Benson finished second to 
national champion Nate Harris 
in the New England champion- 
ships in 1966 and has suqpassed 
several state records in unofficial 
competition. 

The Bowdoin Club will com- 
pete under the name "Brunswick 
Barbell Club" in order to enter 
both AAU and NCAA sanctioned 
meets in Olympic and Power 
lifting. 

A full schedule of dual-meet 
competitions are planned for the 
second semester when the Bears 
will be facing Dartmouth, Bos- 
ton University, Eastern Naza- 
rene, Wesleyan, Northeastern, 
and Bates clubs, In addition, 
Bowdoin wilh be hosting later in 
the year the Maine State AAU 
Olympic Lifting Championships. 
The Brunswick Barbell Club will 
compete in AAU meets in Maine 
and Massachusetts. 

Rounding out the squad is a 
pair of rugged football defensive 
linemen heavyweights in Dick 
Hardy, and Doug MacKinnon, 
Pete Ellis, Mike Denoncour, and 
Bill Christie. Additional members 
are newcomers Bob Goodman, 
Bruce Jordan, and Dan Gilmore. 

Team captain Spill's outlook 
for the year came out when he 
said, "Being faced with the usual 
problems of a newly formed 
athletic club such as inexperi- 
ence, we'll - have our ups and 
downs this year. We are much 
stronger in the power lifts, the 
bench, the squat, the deadlift 
than in the Olympic lifts, press, 
snatch, and clean and jerk. 

"As a team we expect to do 
equally well in our collegiate and 
AAU meets, while some individ- 
uals like Benson, Bouchard, and 
Sewall will probably achieve out- 
standing individual success. 



However, our main hope this 
season will be to give weightlift- 
ing at Bowdoin a strong enough 
base so that the club will remain 
firmly established here. Every 



man on the squad will get a 
chance to lift competitively, and 
while our goal is to win as many 
meets as possible, we also want 
each man to enjoy the season." 




DEAD FROM THE DEADLIFT? Honorary captain, Rick Spill dead- 
lifting 505 pounds. Shattering. 



Mermen Host Springfield; 
Tough Meet Promised Sat. 



Those who make it to tomorrow's swimming con- 
test will be able to witness the finest exhibition of 
swimming talent the Curtis pool will sec this sea- 
son as the Bears entertain two-time New England 
Champions, the Springfield Chiefs. 

Coach Charles K. "Red" Silvia, who has written 
three books according to one source, brings with 
him a 37-man cuntingent. including a national 50- 
yard freestyle champ, a two-time New England 
champ in the 500 and 1650 freestyle events, and a 

eships 

Springfield's two captains both "defy descrip- 
tion." Tim Meyer was the national 50 yard' free- 
style champ with a time of 21.9 and the other co- 
captain, Doug Moulton, is a "student of the sport 
. . . with plenty of speed . . - and excellent tech- 
niques." He holds a number of records from his 
endeavors in the IM. freestyle, and breaststroke 
events. Senior Tom Purcell, a family man with a 
wife and a little girl, is a nationally ranked ninth 
distance man who also sprints well. Ken Spraklin 
literally "came from nowhere to rank with. the best 
collegiate backstrokers in the nation," holding down 
the Springfield 200 record in the process. Straight 



out of Vietnam and the Marines, Paul Rix has been 
turning alot of heads in the sprinting events. Dave 
Laing, a high school A 11- American diver, should 
add strength to the squad in his event. 

The Bowdoin team, in addition to battling many 
tough individual events, also has the Springfield 
teams record to contend with. The Chiefs have 
eleven lettermen returning from last season's first 
place New England and fifth place National swim- 
ming team. Bear Ail-American Ken Ryan should 
face a tough battle in the IM, and 200 man Parker 
Barnes stands a chance at touching his event. The 
squad also boasts two back to back 9-4 seasons. The 
team admits a weakness in its inability to produce 
an additional backstroker to go along with Sprak- 
lin. 

The Bears anticipate having many tough races 
on their hands. Bowdoin Ail-American Ken Ryan 
faces a tough battle in his IM race. Bear 200 free- 
stylo man Parker Barnes will have to produce his 
hest time yet if he is to take that event. Pete Rob- 
inson, one of the stronger sophomores, will also 
have to be working his hardest for his points tomor- 
row. 



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FIELD'S 

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Jewelry 
Musical Supplies 

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BRUNSWICK 



Fall Sports 

Teams Name 
New Captains 



As a postscript to the fall sports 
season, various announcements 
concerning awards and next year's 
captains have come out of the 
various post-season athletic ban- 
quets. 

The football team, sporting a 
3-4* record, grabbed the Colby- 
Bates-Bowdoin championship, and 
elected Roger Dawe as their cap- 
tain for next year. Dawe, a line- 
backer, wa y s named to the Bates 
all-opponent squad and was also 
picked for one of the Eastern Col- 
lege Athletic Conference weekly 
small college teams. 

Charlie Butt's soccer team 
elected halfbacks Tom Huleatt 
and Jeff Sexton as its co-captains 
for 1970. With an overall record 
of 4-5-2, the squad posted three 
players to the All-Maine team — 
ful'back Rollin Ives, halfback 
Rick Barr, and forward Lee Rose. 

Mark Cuneo was elected to the 
next season's Cross Country team 
captain. Cuneo, in addition to tak- 
ing four firsts in the six dual 
meets of the season, was also fifth 
in the state championships and 
was named to the All-Maine 
squad. 



By BRIAN DAVIS 

Orient Sports Writer 

The Thanksgiving holiday was 
not a vacation for the varsity 
basketball team. The squad held 
a Friday practice and a Saturday 
scrimmage at Northeastern Uni- 
versity in Boston as well as home 
practices. Unfortunately, both 
the scrimmage and practices had 
a hampering effect on the team's 
condition. 

During practice in Brunswick 
on Thursday, promising sopho- 
more Mike Brennan took out 
some basketball frustrations on 
a wall and broke his ankle, put- 
ting him out of action for eight 
weeks. Then, while practicing at 
Northeastern on Friday, forward 
Steve Theroux also suffered an 
ankle injury. However, Theroux 
should be able to play this week- 
end against Amherst. As if these 
two events were not disasterous 
enough, the Bears then lost the 
scrimmage to Northeastern's 
Huskies, not winning a period 
during the encounter. 

The University of New Hamp- 
shire's Wildcats quite literally 
added insult to injury when 
they handily defeated the Bears 
last Monday, 75*55. The opening 
contest at Durham proved to be 
a test of Bear "defense-cracking"" 
ability. The Wildcats controlled 
both offensive and defensive re- 
bounding with overpowering 
board strength, .especially in the 
height aspect. With this domin- 
ance of the boards, UNH virtual- 
ly squelched Bowdoin's scoring 
attack by allowing the Bears only 
one shot per turn over. At the 
same time, UNH could afford a 
low "shots attempted — shots 
made'" percentage by continually 
rebounding its misses. The main 
difficulty, however, Jor Bowdoin 
was successfully penetrating the 
New Hampshire defense zone in 
order to even attempt a shot. Al- 
though the Bears trailed UNH 
by only 11 points at halftime, the 
Wildcat's second half defensive 
effort was too great and to tiring 
for the Bears to overcome. The 
final score was a dismal 75-55 
with Bowdoin's leading scorer, 
Steve Carey, compiling 13 points. 
" The Lord Jeffs will be on cam- 
pus tomorrow to open Bowdoin's 
home schedule. The Bears feel 
that their man to man defense 
will contain Amherst. 



22 



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THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 



VOLUME XCDC 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK. MAINE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1969 



NUMBER 10 

1 



Wicker Urges Youth 
To Trust Humanity 

By PAUL BATISTA 

Tom Wicker is one of the men who influences the institution that influences the world. For- 
merly Washington bureau chief, now an associate editor, Wicker, at 39, writes a regular column 
for The New York Times. Like many Timesmen, he talks about "our" paper, about that im- 
mensely influential good gray lady, and he carries with him some of the scars of recent Times 
conflicts. For instance, he became head of the Washington bureau after reporting brillantly on 
the first Kennedy assassination. In 1 968, as the result of a power struggle at the limes which he 
and others "lost," he was offered the associate editorship and the column. At the same time, he 
continued to function 



Maine Seniors Meet 
College Admissions Men 



as more 
than a journalists, as a public fig- 
ure, as Wicker of the New York 
Times and the special associations 
of all that. 

Wicker spoke on Tuesday eve- 
ning on "Youth and the Estab- 
lishment," or "in the general vi- 
cinity of youth and the establish- 
ment." He characterizes himself 
as "a member of neither group," 
which is untrue. Wicker is South- 
ern; he sometimes talks in that 
' Carolina style of his, mentioning, 
for example, that the Office of 
Economic Opportunity has 
"passed through the valley of the 
shadow." He refers to the "folks," 
to a "church down my way." 
Wicker repeats a distinct pattern 
on The Times; a number of other 
men whose names appear each 
day on the masthead are South- 
ern, as was Ochs, who bought the 
paper in 1896. Wicker also has a 
Southern sense of conscience. 
Now that he is a columnist, he 
allows himself that slight moral- 
istic tone that James Reston de- 
veloped, and Wicker is a child of 
Reston's Washington bureau. 
« Wicker wants to sense "the coun- 
try out there," and to teach out 
there how to act better. He 
(Please tarn to page 5) 

Two One-Act 
Plays Tonight 

Two one-act plays, "A Son, 
Come Home" by Ed Bullins and 
"The Long Christmas Dinner" by 
Thornton Wilder, will be pre- 
sented by Masque and Gown, the 
Bowdoin College dramatic organ- 
ization, tonight and tomorrow. 
The plays will be staged at 8:15 
p.m. in the Experimental Theater, 
Memorial Hall, On the Bowdoin 
campus. 

Tickets are now on sale at the 
Moulton Union Information Desk 
and Reservations may be made by 
telephoning 725-8731, Ext 375. 
General admission is 50 cents, and 
Bowdoin students and faculty 
members may obtain tickets with 
their I.D. cards. 

The Bullins play is directed by 
H. Clyde Vanhorn '70. The cast 
includes Brenda Noel, Jean Wil- 
liams, Ronald I. Hines 71 and 
Matthew H. Hunter, Jr. '72. 

The Wilder play is directed by 
Earl R. Taylor 71. The cast in- 
cludes Hope Moulton, Constance 
Aldrich. Nancy Moulton, Marion 
Turner, Judy Matthews, Virginia 
Burnham, Kathy Greason, John 
A. Coons 73; Karl G. Wassmann, 
m 73; Stevan L. Sylvester '73; 
Richard C. Ludmerer 72; and 
William A Fink 73. 




By NORM CAREY 

On Saturday, December 13, 
Bowdoin will host two hundred 
and fifty of Maine's finest high 
school juniors and seniors, along 
with the admissions officers and 
student representatives of at 
least twenty-three competitive 
Eastern liberal arts colleges. Ev- 
ery secondary school in the state 
had been invited to participate, 
each one being allowed to send up 
to six students. The boy-girl ratio 
is roughly about 2:3, and of the 
two hundred and fifty students, 
two hundred and twenty will come 
from public institutions. The fol- 
lowing colleges and universities 
will be represented here Satur- 
day: 

Amherst, Bates, Boston Univer- 
sity, Brown, Colby, Connecticut 
College, Harvard, Middlebury, 
Mount Holyoke, Pembroke, Rad- 
cliffe, Smith, Trinity, Tufts, Uni- 
versity of Maine (Orono), Univer- 
sity of New Hampshire, Vassar, 
Wellesley, Wheaton, Williams, 
and Yale. 

Of the twenty-six schools in- 
vited, only Barnard, Brandeis, and 
Wesleyan did not respond. 

The day will start off with reg- 
istration and coffee for the stu- 
dents, followed by a session called 
"Admissions" at 10 a.m. at Pick- 
ard Theater in Memorial Hall. 



Student, Teacher Gap Bridged 



Student-Taught Course Proposed 



By JAY SWEET 

If there is a single dominant 
theme to the pressures for change 
currently being exerted on Amer- 
ican higher education it is cer- 
tainly that students are demand- 
ing an increased role in the fash- 
ioning of their educational des- 
tinies. On Thursday of this, week, 
an open meeting of the full facul- 
ty considered what may be the 
ultimate expression of those de- 
mands. Eight Bowdoin sopho- 
mores have designed a course 
which they now wish to teach for 
credit. The significance of this 
proposal in relation to the tradi- 
tional curriculum is to be under- 
stood only upon examination of 
the course's genesis, structure, 
and goals. 

The course, if accepted, will ap- 
pear in the catalogue as Govern- 
ment 22: Perspectives on Political 
Modernization — Africa. It was 
created as the advanced sequel to 
Professor Rensenbrink's Fresh- 
man seminar on Africa, Govern- 
ment 21. All eight of the course's 
originators were members of that 
course. They are Tony Bucci, 
Randy Curtis, Stephen Fendler, 
Richard Fudge, Michael Hastings, 
Stephen Maclntyre, Barry Mills, 
and John Parsons. The eight's 
first break with Bowdoin's Edu- 
cational Tradition occurred when 
they maintained an interest in the 
course's subject matter beyond 
the semester's end. Each of the 
eight continued to work on a proj- 
ect begun in Gov. 21. These proj- 
ects range from the obviously po- 
litically-oriented work on Fend- 



ler on African socialism to the ap- 
parently apolitical, Bucci's re- 
search on African sculpture. Last 
semester, still under the auspices 
of Prof. Rensenbrink, they of- 
fered a free seminar, "Africa- 
Angry Young Giant." Despite the 
disadvantages of the free seminar 
format, the eight claim partial 
success. Although the seminar 
could be given no priority over 
formal courses by those who at- 
tended, there was sufficient inter- 
est to justify the continuation of 
the seminar to its end. The stu- 
dent's petition for regular course 
status is simply an expedient way 



to overcome these difficulties. The 
course structure is designed in 
recognition of the fact that there 
are certain limitations to the job 
the instructors are) able to do. It 
will be graded on a pass-fail ba- 
sis; after a preliminary introduc- 
tion consisting of presentations 
by each of the instructors in his 
area of concentration, the class 
will divide into study groups of 
three or four. During the final 
weeks of the semester, the class 
will reassemble to discuss and 
correlate individual research. 
The course is at least partially 
(Please tarn to page 6) 



The principal speaker will be Eu- 
gene S. Wilson, Dean of Admis- 
sions at Amherst College. After 
his address there will be a dis- 
cussion among Mrs. Patricia Wa- 
ters, Assistant Director of Ad- 
missions at Mount Holyoke Col- 
lege; Eugene A. Savage, Director 
of Admissions at the University 
of New Hampshire; and Mr. Moll. 

At 10:45 a.m. a session entitled 
"Financial Aid" will deal with fi- 
nancial aid resources and policies. 
Speaking will be Bryce Grindle, 
Assistant Director of Financial 
Aid at the University of Maine 
(Orono) ; and Walter H. Moulton, 
Director of Student Aid at Bow- 
doin. 

"The On-Campus Scene," a 
panel discussion of college life by 
undergraduates, will be held at 
11:25 a.m. The participants in this 
discussion will include students 
representing Colby, Harvard, 
Smith, and Williams. 

After lunch in the Moulton 
Union at 12:30 p.m. guided tours 
of the campus will be available 
until 2:30. The "College" session 
will be held from 2:30 to 4 p.m. 
in the main dining room of the 
Senior Center, where representa- 
tives of all participating colleges 
and universities will be available 
at marked tables to talk with in- 
terested parties. 

The participants in the "State 
of Maine Day" will be able to at- 
tend free of charge a number of 
other events to take place on the 
campus Saturday. These include 
Bowdoin's 40th annual Interschol- 
astlc Debate Forum, 2 p.m. in 
Sills Hall; a varsity swimming 
meet against the University of 
Massachusetts, 2 p.m. in the Cur- 
tis Pool; a varsity wrestling 
match against Amherst, 2 p.m. in 
Sargent Gymnasium; a varsity 
hockey game against Army, 7:30 
p.m. in the Bowdoin Arena; and 
two one-act plays, to be staged at 
8:15 p.m. in the Experimental 
Theater, Memorial Hall, by 
Masque & Gown, Bowdoin's dra- 
matic organization. 

For two years Bowdoin- has 

been holding a State of Maine 

Day in mid-December without the 

participation of other colleges, 

(Please tarn to page 2) 



Varsity-Frosh Distinction Maintained 



By JOHN WEISS 

During 1968 there was legislation up before the 
N.C.A.A. to allow freshmen to participate in var- 
sity sports. Most of the Eastern universities and 
colleges were opposed to the legislation. The Ivy 
League, Yankee Conference, Little Three, the Pen- 
tagonal schools (Bowdoin, ' Amherst Dartmouth, 
Wesleyan and Williams) and practically all of Bow- 
doin's athletic opponents stood against the new 
rule in the N. C. A. A. voting. However, the measure 
passed and schools with enrollments under 1,250 
were allowed to use freshman athletes on varsity 
teams. In February of 1969 the Pentagonal schools 
and our other opponents drew up a statement to 
the effect that they would continue their regular 
freshman athletic programs. Explicit in the state- 
ment was the common agreement that freshmen 
would not be used by these schools on their varsity 
teams. 

On Dec. 1, 1969, Mr. Stuckey, Director of Athlet- 
ics at Bowdoin, received the following letter from 



the acting athletic chairman at Amherst A similar 
letter was received from M.I.T. 

December 1, 1969 
Dear Dan, (Stuckey) 

It has become necessary for us to take a rather 
drastic step in our policy concerning freshman 
competition on varsity teams. We have for 
many years carried on separate programs and if 
the number of participants makes it possible, we 
will continue to do so in the future. In some sports 
this winter we have fallen well below the minimum 
needed to carry out our freshman program and have 
asked for permission to waive the one-year resi- 
dence rule. Asa Bushnell tells me, since we are un- 
der 1,250 enrollment, that permission will be 
granted. 

I am sure you will understand the need for this 
when I teU you the numbers involved. Our fresh- 
man team has six candidates and the freshman 
hockey team has five. The wrestling team may have 

(Please tarn to page 5) 




*«. 




PAGE TWO 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1969 



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The KLH Model Twenty-One is even 
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self-contained radio, it has outlets for 
external speakers and for making tape 
recordings. 

It won't do everything. It isn't stereo, 
and it doesn't play records. It's just the best 
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(Continued from page 1) 
with the idea of selling itself to 
those secondary school students 
who attended. The motive behind 
this year's event (proudly 
acknowledged by the Bowdoin 
Admissions Department as the 
first state-wide activity of its kind 
in the country) seems to be a de- 
cidely altruistic break with the 
past. Apparently the college is re- 
defining its position and responsi- 
bility with respect to the state 
which has for so long provided it 
with a good number of its top 
students. Bowdoin is now realiz- 
ing the need for, as Mr. David R. 
Treadwell Jr., Associate Director 
of Admissions put it, a "Maine 
commitment." The unique State 
of Maine Day which Bowdoin has 
set up as a means of fulfilling this 
commitment is hoped to make 
known to the best Maine students 
some of the opportunities for 
higher education available to 
them. 

That this new "commitment" 
will greatly benefit many Maine 
youths is not doubted. There is, 
however, the question of what lies 
ahead foe Bowdoin if she is will- 
ingly to let "outside competition" 
tap the resources of Maine brain- 
power on which it so heavily 
leans. This fall there was a signi- 
ficant drop in the percentage of 
freshmen entering Bowdoin from 
Maine. If the State of Maine Day 
becomes open to competition it is 
feared that Bowdoin's position 
with Maine boys will be even fur- 
ther weakened. It is also feared 
that the quality of boys applying 
to Bowdoin will decline. 

Mr. William D. Shipman, Pro- 
fessor of Economics and former 
member of the Admissions Com- 
mittee at Bowdoin, when asked 
about the new State of Maine 
Day idea, replied that it was 
.okay if we expect reciprocal ac- 
tion from other schools . . ." This 
reciprocation does not as yet ex- 
ist. 

What is a benefit to Maine 
youth seems in effect not very 
beautiful to Bowdoin at all, but 
what constitutes a "benefit" can 
itself be argued. To end with some 
remarks by Professor Shipman is 
to best put forth the problem that 
Bowdoin now faces : "I admit that 
it is a good thing for the boys, but 
whether it is a good thing tor 
Bowdoin remains to be seen . . , 
we may be doing them a service, 
but the question is what is going 
to happen at Bowdoin." 

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FRIDAY. DECEMBER 5, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE THREF. 



Faculty ^ Wi|l_Xonsider 



Two Lectures Given 



Afro-Am Major Proposal Historians Make History Here 



By JEFF DRI'MMOXD 

The Committee on Afro-Ameri- 
can Studies was formed last year 
in late April, for the central pur- 
pose of recommending a major 
program in Afro-American 
studies. This year, the Committee 
is composed of Ashley Streetman, 
Reginald Lewis, William Hughes, 
John Rensenbrink, Daniel Ros- 
sides, James Ward; and students 
Gregory McQuater, Arnold Tomp- 
kins, Paul Wiley, Eldrige Butler, 
and Harrison Tate. 

The case for a black studies 
major is overpowering. A deepen- 
ing of the black awareness of then- 
culture and unique identity will 
increase the cultural identity of 
the whole society in two ways. 
First, as it underlines the unique 
properties of the black identity, 
the major will likewise emphasize 
those of the white culture, ex- 
panding the culture of the whole 
by expanding the unique cultures 
of the parts. Secondly, by a re- 
lated argument, the program will 
deepen the cultural background 
of the whole society by develop- 
ing the background of any single 
one of its parts; this is much the 
same as the syling of a house: no 
matter how different the styles of 
the different rooms, if ony one 
room is made more beautiful, the 
whole house is more beautiful. 

Another important function for 
the black studies major to fulfill 
is the strengthening of the per- 
sonal identity of young blacks. It 
is now an established sociological 
fact that adolescence is a re-or- 
ganizing of the identity. In the 
past, the young black has had 
only a white history, with white 
heroes, with which he can identi- 
fy. With a new program, he will 
learn the contribution of his race 
to society, and has a background 
on which to build his own per- 
sonality. The importance of these 
two objectives cannot be over- 
emphasized. 

The initiative, then, was up to 
this year's Committee on Afro- 
American Studies (CAAS). Their 
decision, a description of two op- 
tions for the program, was no 
more than a very broad outline of 
the most effective course plan of 
which they could conceive. Both 
options involved a course require- 
ment of six to eight credit semes- 
ters, with a major course and a 
seminar. The first option involved 
a much more comprehensive com- 
mitment from the college: a new 
department, including professors 
from each of the present social 
studies disciplines, would offer 
courses under the heading of the 
Afro-American Department. Each 
professor would teach those 
courses which lay in his field of 
specialty: for instance, The Poli- 
tics of Black Power, or The His- 
torical, Sociological, and Econom- 
ic Sources of Prejudice and Dis- 
crimination. Although this option 
simplifies the selection of courses 
for the student, it would be very 
difficult to implement quickly, 
and would necessitate a radical 
re-organization of the whole fac- 
ulty. 

The second option, not inferior 
academically, is much easier to 
affect. Out of a selected list of 
courses presently offered, the ma- 
jor would choose those which ap- 
pealed to him, with the major 
course being the backbone of the 
program. Then, gradually, facili- 



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ties, and course offerings could be 
improved steadily; the number of 
personnel would also be increased. 

The benefits of either option of 
this program are almost infinite. 
It will entail, for practical pur- 
poses, no huge financial commit- 
y ment; the whole program is so 
flexible that any defects can be 
quickly ironed out; it lets the 
black, or indeed the white, stu- 
dent to help direct his own educa- 
tion; it will increase the willing- 
ness of the black to contribute his 
own motivations and talents; 
whites. and blacks will gradually 
learn more about the society, and 
therefore the actions, of each 
other; and it will* further a less 
biased account of history and cul- 
ture. *jT 

The CAAS choset he second op- 
tion, in great part for the speed 
with Which it could be imple- 
mented. The courses they chose 
(Please turn to page 4) 

Afro- Am House 
Plans To Open 
After Vacation , 

By SAUL GREENFIELD 

Bob Johnson, president of Bow- 
doin's Afro-American Society, an- 
nounced at the Student Council 
meeting last Monday that the 
Reverend Jesse Jackson of the 
. Southern Christian Leadership 
Conference, Martin Luther King's 
creation, and Mahalia Jackson, 
the singer, will be present at the 
formal opening of the new Afro- 
American Center on January 15. 
January 15 is the birthday of Dr. 
King. The Afro-American Society 
is trying to have January 15 made 
a national holiday. They have 
passed a resolution calling on 
other Afro-Am societies around 
the country to aid in the effort. 
The Student Council passed a si- 
milar resolution asking the stu- 
dent councils of other colleges to 
help and requesting that the Col- 
lege suspend classes on Jan. 15. 

The Council also discussed the 
offer of a marketing concern to 
provide discounts on certain 
goods and services for Bowdoin. 



By FRED CI 'SICK 

Historians are queer birds. They 
come in every size, shape, color 
and disposition. Some, like Roger 
Howell and Paul Nyhus, resemble 
stockbrokers. Ernst Helmreich 
has the face of a Roman senator. 
Daniel Lcvine was once mistaken 
for a janitor. E dwar d Gibbon, a 
cherub. H. R. Trevor-Roper, a 
bookkeeper. Only Arnold Toyn- 
bee, of the living historians, ac- 
tually looks as though he might 
be a historian. 

Last week two very different 
historians spoke at Bowdoin. One 
of them was a success; the other 
a failure. Neither of them looked 
like a historian. 

Professor Jack Hexter, a short, 
bald man who resembles a high 
school gym teacher, gave a Phi 
Beta Kappa address on "The An- 
nihilation of History." The ad- 
dress was a disaster. One Bow- 
doin history professor there dis- 
•missed it as "trite as hell." "The 
Annihilation of History" was 
based on a recurring daydream 
that Hexter had had. In his dream 
he was at a cocktail party and a 
lady with a Southern accent came 
up to him and said, "So you're a 
historian. Tell me, what's going 
to happen next?" He replied, "I 
not only don't know what's going 
to happen next, I don't even know 
what happened last." The lady 
answered, "Well then, what's the 
use of history?" The whole ad- 
dress was designed to answer the 
question, "What's the use of his- 
tory?" 

Hexter spent most of his time 
defining what "history" is. He fi- 
nally decided that "history" is 
critical history (i.e. the history 
that historians write). He said 
that this kind of history was good 
and that is should not be annihil- 
ated. There was perfunctory ap- 
plause. 

George Dangerfield, who de- 
livered a lecture on "The Strange 
Death of Liberal England," also 
had daydreams. However, his 
were considerably more interest- 
ing than Hexter's: "When I was 
five years old I remember being 
held up to the nursery window 
by my nurse, in 1910 I suppose, 
to view Halley's Comet. She said, 
'You better look at this carefully 
because when it comes around 
again you'll be dead.' " It was a 
"very traumatic, experience. 



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"Stewart Hughes has said that 
we must look into a historians 
childhood to discover what made 
him a historian. I suppose, that 
event helped me to become a his- 
torian ... I am in the place that 
Herodotus was when he said that 
he wrote his history of the Per- 
sian Empire because if he didn't 
they would simply vanish. All the 
great men, all the great battle? 
and events would simply vanish." 

Dangerfield talked about King 
Edward VII who presided over 
"Liberal England. " "He was a 
phallic figure in a dignified way. 
Kings are allowed to be. Queens 
are not. He wasn't bad like George 
IV. just comfortable disreput- 
able." 

Liberal England died with the 
Ulster revolt when a British army 
brigade mutined rather than sup- 
press the treasonable activities of 
the Orangemen. It was born in 



the concentration camps of the 
Boer War. Dangerfield described 
it as a time of great vitality: "a 
jailbreak," "not pleasant," "not a 
sunset era," "an era of tremen- 
dous life which began for me with 
the comet . . ." 

Although Dangerfield denied 
any attempt to draw historical 
parallels "The Strange Death of 
Liberal England" has some warn- 
ings for our era. During the Boer 
War the British "discovered that 
they were hated . . . they thought 
that they were very loved, the 
protector of little nations and all 
that." but "they were hated." The 
shock of their unpopularity put 
the British on the defensive and 
led them along militaristic path 
to the great holocaust of World 
War I. "A whole generation was 
murdered." Perhaps Winston 
Churchill was wrong. Perhaps 
history does, or will, repeat itself. 



Cal Options Examined 



By JOHN WEISS 

The Faculty-Student Commit- 
tee on Athletics has met three 
limes this semester and will meet 
again Tuesday, December 16. As 
one member of the committee hy- 
perl>olized, "We haven't met this 
much in the last three years." The 
recent flurry of activily isn't, as 
some students believe, either di- 
reclionless or completely fruit- 
less. The committee is addressing 
itself to the task of re-evaluating 
the school's policy toward com- 
pulsory physical education. The 
members of the committee are 



aware that this kind of periodical 
reassessment can be valuable. A 
Faculty member of the committee 
stated, "Perhaps the system is a 
kind of a hangover from another 
era when main thought was given 
to producing a well-rounded type 
of person. But the matter is cer- 
tainly open to debate." Question- 
ing the relevancy of the old sys- 
tem of compulsory cal, however, 
is a far cry from proposing a 
workable, and more importantly, 
"acceptable" new program. Dean 
Greason was asked if the commit- 
( Please turn to page 4) 




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PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. DECEMBER 5, 1969 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Volume XCIX 



Friday, December 12, 1969 



Number 10 



The Halt and The Blind 

Thursday afternoon, a number of Bowdoin's faculty met 
with eight students who propose to teach an accredited course 
at this College. At one point, a member of the faculty com- 
mented that this course may be a case of the blind leading the 
blind, whereas faculty instructed courses are, at worst, cases 
of the halt leading the blind. The remark was partially facetious; 
as the afternoon wore on, however, its irony became painfully 
apparent. For two hours, the halt interrogated the blind and 
neither group exhibited any real degree of either understanding 
or empathy for the peculiar infirmities of the other. 

The proposal will almost certainly be defeated. With equal 
certainty it will be defeated for the wrong reasons. Behind all 
the rhetoric concerning interdisciplinary work in neglected areas, 
there is a basic assertion. The fundamental argument for a 
course of this sort is that a group of students can come together 
to accomplish something that is impossible within the present 
curricular structure. This something, this mystic union is appar- 
ently expressible only in terms of cliches: "Enthusiasm," "com- 
mitment," '^curiosity," "synthesis," and, yes, Virginia, even 
"relevence." . . . All this will be realized, it is argued, despite 
the obvious limitations of the instructors in teaching competence 
and expertise. The immediate question, the question debated 
Thursday afternoon, is whether this course can succeed; the 
real question, however, is why this course has been proposed 
at all. A representative group of students has come before the 
facultyof the College and said dial at this time and in this place 
the educational structure is failing. They have said that the de- 
sirable educational goals are not being reached by the practiced 
educational means. And, they have suggested an alternative. 

No one is eager to confront that statement. The students 
have an immediate interest in the approval of their course, an 
immediate interest that springs from many secondary sources. 
The faculty would also prefer to deal with this course as such. 
Many of them wish simply to emasculate it beyond recognition 
or to defeat it out of hand. The crucial question of curricular 
change will not resolve itself, however. Nor will it be resolved 
piecemeal, by the passage of an innovation now and another one 
next year. 

The real curricular issues must be faced honestly. The halt 
and the blind must meet and begin the work of, yes, Virginia, 
synthesis. 

Instant Oracles 

Men require their oracles. We need to believe that someone, 
somewhere, knows the Answers, comprehends the incompre- 
hensible, as completely as we ourselves do not. In this age we 
have elevated the journalist. Wisdom is syndicated. The liberal 
religion is embodied in and dispensed daily by the limes, our 
good grey gospel — even if you don't read it all, it's nice to 
know it's all there. 

The oracle, however, is never immune to the myth. If enough 
people accept his answers, why then, yes, perhaps they are the 
Answers. Tom Wicker has apparently fallen victim to his own 
legend. Tuesday evening, he failed to distinguish knowing from 
understanding, Answers from answers. He lost sight of his role, 
an intelligent man with a certain expertise. The world is far more 
in need of careful and thoughtful analysis than eleventh hour 
pep talks. Mr. Wicker quoted Yeats to tell us what we needed. 
It is perhaps appropriate to quote Yeats in response : 

Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold; 

Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world 

The blood dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere 

The ceremony of innocence is drowned ; 

The best lack all conviction, while the worst 

Are full of passionate intensity. 

Masque and Gown Tryouts 

The Bowdoin Masque and Gown 

announces 
tryouts for its winter production 
Slawomir Mrozek's 
THE POLICE - 
directed by Richard Hornby 
This Sunday and Monday eve- 
nings, Dec. 14 and 15, 7:30-9:30 
P.M. in ,the Experimental The- 
atre in Memorial Hall. 



Mrozek is a contemporary Po- 
lish playwright, influenced by 
Beckett and lonesco, whose plays 
have become widely known in 
Europe and England. THE PO- 
LICE is a hilarious satire of a 
police state. 

The play will be performed 
February 11-16. There are parts 
for 5 men and one woman. 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Member of the United States Student Press Association 



Editor 

AIM Kolod 

•Uaactef Editor 

Jay Sweet 

N«wa Editor 

Bok N«jh 

Sport. Editor 
Martta Friedlander 



Business M«n»r»r 

Fred Unffnnin 

Advertising Manarer 

Peter Mejatrick 

Office Manager 

Bob AtaMmi 

Circulation Manager 

Bill Harpin 



EDITORIAL BOARD 

Alan Kolod. Sam Hastings, Jar Sweet, Martin Friedlander. Bab Naah. John Weiaa. 

Paal Barton. Paal Batiata. Medeat Oaadtaa. 

THE BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
A. P. Daggett, J. P. Granger. Alan Kolod. Fred Langereaan, Bob Armstrong. 

Publiihod weekly when classes are held during the Fall and Spring Semester by the 
students of Bowdoin College. Address editorial communications to the Editor and 
business and subscription communications to the Business Manager at the ORIENT 
•foul ton Union. Bowdoin College. Brunswick. Me. 04011. Represented for national 
advertising by the National Educational Advertising Service. Inc. Second class postage 
paid at Brunswick. Me. 04011. The subscription rate is Ave (6) dollars for one year. 



LETTERS TO 
THE EDITOR 



Keep the Faith 



Editor: 

The "PROJECT FAITH" movement requests that 
you assist us by publishing the following open letter 
to the students on your campus. 

Fellow students of the United States: 

Will you join with us in helping this nation to 
know that millions of college students are loyal, 
concerned, positive Americans who with dignity 
and courage commit themselves as individuals to 
FAITH in our great nation, its people, and its lead- 
er? 

Our "PROJECT FAITH" movement calls upon 
students of all political persuasion to rededicate 
themselves to the principles which have made this 
the greatest country in the world. We do not believe 
WAR to be the solution to the problems facing hu- 
manity ! We recognize that our society has problems 
which must be solved, reforms which must be ef- 
fected, improvements which must be made; there- 
fore "PROJECT FAITH" calls upon individuals to 
commit themselves to contributing to the continued 
improvements of our society. As individuals reaf- 
firm and rededicate themselves to this nation and 
its goal, progress can continue. 

We reject NEGATIVISM because NEGATIVISM 
offers no solutions! NEGATIVISM divides and de- 
stroys! NEGATIVISM depletes energy which 
should be expended in creative constructive endea- 
vors! 

Join with us by forming "PROJECT FAITH" 
groups on your campus. Any organization or indi- 
vidual who will carry this "torch" on your campus 
please contact immediately: 

MARY LYNN WHITCOMB 
PAUL HENDRICHSEN 
"PROJECT FAITH" 
Beeman Hall 
Ball State University 
Muncie, Indiana 47306 
Please, seek as many individual endorsements as 
you can, on your campus and in your community, 
for the following STATEMENT OF FAITH: 
PROJECT FAITH 
We, as American citizens, are aware of the need 
for reaffirmation of faith in our country. We accept 
the challenge to seek solutions to problems and urge 
others to reject the negativism that divides and de- 
stroys. While we recognize the right of dissent, we 
also recognize the need for our nation to have in 
time of crisis one national voice. In response to the 



call of the President for a "voice" from the Silent 
Majority, we express the following: 

(1) We endorse the principles of our government 
which have made this country the greatest 
in the world. 

(2) We have faith in the ability of the American 
people to recognize problems and to seek so- 
lutions in a positive manner. 

(3) We do earnestly feel that we must exercise 
an intelligent degree of faith and trust in our 
National Leader in times of this and other 
national crises. 

Bring Back Hu? 

To a high-class Editor: 

Of all the oppressed minority groups on campus, 
we members of those classes admitted by that illus- 
trious, far-famed, and heroic Hubert Shaw are 
the most discriminated against. The two lower 
classes have official labels: "pizzazz" and "nifty." 
We are only sincerely apathetic — a title not given, 
but assumed. Yet, over the years the graduates ad- 
mitted by our man have given more to the global 
community than all of Richard Moll's boys. 

We are further discriminated against in the selec- 
tion of students for courses, witness: Urban Crisis, 
English 50, and Natural Science. 

In addition, the science requirement was dropped 
in time for most of Moll's group, but all of Shaw's 
had to take such a course. 

And look for what people these things were done. 
Richard Moll is accountable for at least 520 mis- 
takes (who knows who he failed to admit? ) . A para- 
phrase of Shakespeare sums up his problem: "Yond 
Dickie has a lean and hungry look./ He thinks too 
much: such men are dangerous." No one can accuse 
our man of that crime. Is it any wonder that several 
of us decided to try to bring back our beloved 
Hubbie? 

When, however, we made our first attempt to 
arouse sentiment for such an action, we found what 
the BOWDOIN COLLEGE ESTABLISHMENT 
was willing to do to protect one of its own. An ad 
was submitted with the appropriate fee to The 
Bowdoin Thymes. It read: "Rise, sons of Hubbie, 
praise his fame." It was not printed. The money 
was not refunded. It could not have been an over- 
sight since an another ad which was on the same 
piece of paper was printed. This was the shot that 
made the Bowdoin man heave. 

Thus, here is our list of non-negotiable demands : 
I. The end of the reign of Richard Moll; 
II. The return of that deposed tradition, Hubert 
Shaw (this can be non-negotiated to his being giv- 
en an assistantship with veto power over anyone 
admitted). 

Who has been causing the trouble on campus? 
Hubbie Shaw men? Of course not. After all, we 
take for our motto the words of Socrates in The 
Republic (p. 32, Corn ford edition) : "It does not 
matter." 

The Committee to Bring Back Hubert Shaw 



Alternative Cal Options Studied 



(Continued from page S) 

tee might propose a new cal pro- 
gram to the faculty and to the 
Board of Directors, and if any new 
program could be implemented by 
next semester. The Dean replied, 
"It's entirely possible after re- 
viewing the physical education 
program of other colleges that 
we'll come to the conclusion that 
ours is the best. However," and 
this was said with emphasis, "I 
seriously doubt that this will hap- 
pen." The Dean also stated that 
any new program could be imple- 
mented by next year but not by 
next semester. 

The programs the committee 
will be discussing next Tuesday 
vary considerably. The system 
which Trinity recently initiated 
is based on a non-compulsory 
principle in which P.E. courses 
are given academic credit. Several 
members of the committee indi- 
cated their interest in this phy- 
sical education system. This type 
of program would benefit the in- 
creasing number of secondary 
school teacher-coaches which 
Bowdoin graduates. However, 
such a program does present 
problems. For instance: Should a 
P.E. course give yield to the same 
amount of credit as physical 
chemistry or comparative anat- 
omy? Several of the committee 
members shy away from the rad- 
ical changes the Trinity plan ne- 
cessistates. Instead they would 
prefer to see the compulsory cal 
program continued, but the length 
of required participation short- 
ened to one year less. One student 
member of the committee sug- 
gested that students be required 
to take only one semester of cal. 
He also stated that it would be 



an improvement if students could 
schedule cal to their own conveni- 
ence. "Some students might pre- 
fer to take their semester junior 
or even senior year." The com- 
mittee doesn't seem to think that 
abolition of compulsory cal would 
produce a viable physical educa- 
tion program. As Dean Greason 
stated, "This is a service the 
school provides which might not 
be very effective if it were op- 
tional." 

The philosophical question im- 
plicit in the discussion of compul- 
sory versus voluntary cal has re- 
mained unanswered. Should the 
student be forced to participate 
in any Bowdoin program, whether 
academic or non-academic? It's 
not that the committee is unable 
to come to grips with the ques- 
tion. The fact is that they con- 



sider it an irrelevant question. 
Dean Greason thinks the cal pro- 
gram can't function unless it is 
obligatory- This primary concern 
is providing the compulsory "ser- 
vice" of physical education. 

Chapel requirement has gone. 
The science requirement is de- 
funct. Speech three is now a vol- 
untary course. Compulsory cal, 
that symbol of an age gone by, is 
still somehow hanging on. 

The members of the committee 
obviously feel that if compulsion 
is necessary to successfully im- 
plement a program then other 
considerations are secondary. It's 
irrelevant if the compulsion is 
right or wrong; it's necessary. It's 
irrelevant if some people are in- 
convenienced; the compulsion is 
necessary for the success of the 
program. 



Afro-Am Major Program 



(Continued from page S) 

from the present curriculum 
range from Psych. 24 and Rel. 12 
to Ec. 10, History 34, and the -Ur- 
ban Crisis. The proposal was sub- 
mitted to the Curriculum and 
Educational Policy Committee of 
the faculty in hopes that it could 
be discussed in the January meet- 
ing of the Governing Boards. 

The whole program, of course, 
depends on the Afro-American 
Studies courses 1-2, and 5, 6, 7, 
and 8. Herein lies the great virtue 
of the major program, for any stu- 
dent can pursue his own special- 
ty; at the same time, any program 
which is not worthwhile can be 
eliminated promptly. 

An overview of the program 



leaves one thing crystal-clear: 
this proposal is only the bones of 
a major in black studies, it is only 
a foundation for expansion of the 
department and its offerings. As a 
foundation, as the structure on 
which to build a complete pro- 
gram in black studies, it is with- 
out doubt a step in the right di- 
rection, and should be passed by 
the faculty and Governors; if, 
however, it is not a skeleton, but 
is seen as the terminal point of 
Bowdoin's black studies, as a goal 
rather than a point of departure, 
it is hopelessly inadequate. If the 
Board of Governors passes it, 
which they should do, it must be 
passed as a framework around 
which must be built a comprehen- 
sive major. 



FRIDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1969 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE FIVE 



-?*- 



Wicker Interprets Recent Events Trinity Reforms Curriculum 



(Continued from page 1) 

mean circulation and audience. It 
often means an interaction be- 
tween national reporters like 
Wicker and men elected to high 
office in this country. The rela- 
tionship between a specific poli- 
tician and a national reporter can 
be intricate, balancing matters of 
trust and distrust, use and abuse. 
Wicker is either shunned or 
courted, but he is taken as a seri- 
ous power. His consent or approv- 
al of a particular program can 
give a large boost to a Northern, 
urban politician, because The 
Times' main audience is in the 
urban north. The rest of the coun- 
try, served by the New York 
Times syndicate, responds too, 
but frequently the response is 
"abusive." As Wicker commented, 
"Letters postmarked Corpus 
Christi, Texas, are more likely 
than not abusive." 

Now that he appears on the 
opinion rather than the news 
pages of the Times, Wicker wor- 
ries about losing touch with the 
country. One of the concerns of 
any columnist is that, sooner or 
later, he may run dry. Wicker 
lives, he admits, with real fears 
of "losing touch." And he has his 
moments of revelation: at the 
1968 convention in Chicago, rec- 
ognized by a group of demonstra- 
tors, who say, "Join us, Mr. Wick- 
er, join us," he walked on. A 
journalist's training teaches him 
to react negatively, not to parti- 
cipate because a reporter "sees" 
and reproduces what he sees. But 
Wicker confesses to guilt over 
leaving; he had not realized the 
emotion behind the event. 

Wicker discussed youth, and 
secondarily discussed youth and 
the establishment. New York 
Times is Establishment press; 
anyone working for the Times has 
conflict, if at aU real to him, be- 
tween himself and the Establish- 



ment. Wicker in discussion is less 
formal, less moral, less Southern, 
than Wicker in lecture. Wicker 
delivered the lecture as a series 
of themes, while he reacts more 
easily to questions. 

Lecturing, Wicker believed that 
"youth assert values more fierce- 
ly than any generation ever did." 
Today's youth reject "alphabeti- 
cal nightmares like ABM and 
MIRV." After this, the next theme 
enters — as a whole the construc- 
tion was methodical, sermonlike, 
block built upon block. "The dif- 
ferences," he said, "between 
young and old are deeper than 
differences of perception that have 
always divided them." Wicker 
continued: "Change has produced 
a new world in which you, this 
generation in this room, must live. 
The major change is the spread of 
affluence. My generation flour- 
ished in the production of wealth. 
This isn't so anymore . . . The 
great issue is not the standard 
of living, but the quality of life." 

Affluence has created its civili- 
zation and its discontents; so has 
the subject of the next theme, 
technology. It is "an inadequate 
expression of interests. Technol- 
ogy should improve the lot of 
man." 

Wicker said : 

• "There is a broader scale of 
failure. The political system has 
broken down. We aren't organized 
to cope with the twentieth cen- 
tury." Later, in discussion, Wick- 
er revealed himself as the report- 
er fascinated by politics; he saw 
hope in specific changes, such as 
proposed revisions in how dele- 
gates are selected to the national 
Democratic Convention. Again the 
political observer, he "sees prob- 
lems in a national primary" to 
select presidential candidates. 

• Next theme: "Just as all in- 
stitutions fail, so do ethics, not 
personal morals, but common as- 
sumptions endlessly asserted." 



Drug Liberalization 
Considered In Canada 

OTTAWA, Ontario — (CPS) — Canadian Health Minister John 
Munro has indicated that the Canadian government is considering ac- 
tion within months to liberalize, and possible abolish, laws which ban 
possession and use of marijuana. 

Munro told a Canadian paper that increasingly widespread use of 
marijuana showed that harsh penalties were not working as a deter- 
rent, "If the penalties were a deterrent there wouldn't be increasing 
use," he said. 

The health minister, however, did not give any indication that the 
government would change its stiff laws against trafficking in mari- 
juana. 

The Canadian government has established a commission to make an 
intensive study of the drug problem and a preliminary report is due 
next January. A final report will not be issued until June 1971. The 
commission is staffed by men who are recognized as experts in their 
respective fields of law, political science, psychology, and medical re- 
search. 

Dr. H. B. Coltram, Ontario's supervising coroner, stated that mari- 
juana should be legalized and distribution controlled by a federal gov- 
ernment agency. Coltram also suggested a study program to learn 
the effect of marijuana on users. 

Judge William Little of Ontario's Juvenile and Family Court agreed 
with Coltram's suggestion. The judge said he would rather see young 
people smoke marijuana than tobacco. 

The judge declared that laws against persons under 16 possessing 
tobacco should be enforced despite the unpopularity of these laws. In 
June, Judge Little convicted a 15-year-old Toronto girl of illegal pos- 
session of tobacco — one of the first such convictions in several years 
in that city. 

NEW YORK — (CPS) — A narcotics official in California has said 
society has lost its fight against marijuana, and it should now begin 
to treat pot under the type of controls that exist for alcohol. 

"Marijuana use pervades almost every sector of our society," says 
Weldon H. Smith, coordinator of narcotics programs for the Califor- 
nia Department of Corrections. He said pot users are functioning 
well in all aspects of American life, including education, athletics, and 
the professions. 

Smith spoke at a conference on prevention of narcotics addiction 
sponsored by the New York State Narcotic Addiction Control Com- 
mission. 



Constantines ' 

212 Maine Street — Brunswick 
Headquarters For KLH Components 



e Wicker on ethics and vio- 
lence: As a society, "we urge that 
nothing is so evil as violence. Ours 
is nothing but a violent society 
... To apply non-violence selec- 
tively is to make a mockery of it." 
Wicker mentioned the recent po- 
lice slayings of Black Panthers 
in Chicago and Los Angeles, urg- 
ing a full investigation. 

e "A profound task of rebuild- 
ing lies ahead." Society "has to be 
completely built over." 

Finally, as an evangelist, he 
warned the younger generation. 
' It may be that Wicker now at- 
tempts to find a rationale, or a 
moral, behind all the news he has 
seen for years; behind, in a sense, 
all the trouble he's seen. It is part 
of Wicker's own moral effort to 
understand: "This generation has 
too small a sense of tragedy, and 
not enough awareness of come- 
dy." 

He quoted William Faulkner's 
1949 Nobel Prize acceptance 
speech, his voice actually resem- 
bling recordings of Faulkner's 
own: "... a universal and physi- 
cal fear so long sustained by now 
that we can even bear it ..." He 
quoted Yeats, "All things fall and 
are built again/And those that 
build them again are gay." Wick- 
er, who has written several nov- 
els, had mentioned earlier that 
impressions were often more im- 
portant than facts: a novelist, a 
moralist, sits beneath the skin of 
an extremely adept journalist. 
Wicker manages to sustain the 
tension of the two. 



Hartford, Conn. — (LP.) — 
Commenting on the newly- 
adopted curriculum, President 
Theodore D. Lockwood of Trinity 
College points out that "In mov- 
ing away from fixed requirements 
the faculty has sought to encour- 
age the continuing revision of the 
curriculum in directions which 
will bring a compelling freshness 
to the courses which students 
select. 

"The individual student will de- 
sign his own program with the 
aid of a faculty advisor to meet 
his own needs, not the assumed 
needs of an entire student body. 
From the experience in a fresh- 
man seminar the faculty hopes 
that each student will think 
seriously about the courses which 
he should take both to prepare 
himself for an area of concentra- 
tion and to assure himself of that 
breadth which has been the hall- 
mark of the liberal education. 

"It is no longer possible to 
claim that one program will be 
appropriate to all students, but it 
does not follow that there is no 
educational design proper to 
young scholars. The faculty is ask- 
ing the future Trinity undergrad- 
uate to justify his choices rather 
than check off requirements 
against a master list. 

"Knowledge alone is not 
enough; a sense of inquiry and the 
pleasure of discovery must accom- 
pany the search for truth. At the 
heart of the new curriculum is the 
conception that the motivation of 



a student is critical to the lasting 
effect of new knowledge. 

"Thus the emphasis of the new 
program shifts away from purely 
expository presentation of infor- 
mation to true teaching — teach- 
ing conceived of as the opportuni- 
ty to explore different ways of 
seeing our world, to discuss im- 
portant ideas, to uncover new 
ways in which to lend significance 
to human life. 

"For in the liberal arts college 
it seems to me, we are pre-emin- 
ently concerned with the values 
by which men live, not alone the 
techniques by which we measure, 
analyze, and transmit. Therefore, 
it is less important who is formal- 
ly responsible for the lesson plan 
than it is that intellectual excite- 
ment occur. In some instances 
students learn best in a large lec- 
ture well presented; in other 
cases individual research may 
lead to a lasting respect for the 
world of fact; and in still another 
situation the give-and-take of a 
seminar may evoke a fresh vision 
of the applicability of wisdom to 
society's problems. 

"And I might add two points 
about the curriculum. Because 
Trinity is a small college, it is still 
possible to analyze the effective- 
ness of a curriculum. Also, we 
shall not forsake our strength in 
preparing students for advanced 
study: departmental majors will 
have their traditional_rigor. What- 
ever conclusion we reach five 
years hence, the College may take 
pride in striking out boldly in new 
directions." 



Varsity- Freshman Distinction... 



(Continued from page 1) 

classes in a meet. 

I regret that I have to inform you of this at such 
a late date. 

Sincerely yours, 
BEN F. McCABE 
Acting Chairman 

Subsequently the Student-Faculty Committee on 
Athletics chaired by Dean Greason, met to decide 
Bowdoin's course of action as a result of Amherst's 
and MIT's unexpected announcements. The com- 
mittee unanimously decided to reaffirm the state- 
ment made in February, 1969. The distinction be- 
tween varsity and freshmen sports will be main- 
tained at Bowdoin. 

Dean Greason stated his personal opinion: "The 
distinction between varsity and freshmen athletics 
should be kept in major sports. In minor sports, 
however, freshmen and upper classmen might meet 
and participate jointly to their mutual benefit." Mr. 
Stuckey said that there are valid arguments for 

Concert Set 
For Sunday 



to take advantage of this also to put all weight 
and against freshmen competing in varsity sports. 
"There is definitely a place for frosh sports. There 
are many athletes at Bowdoin who, for various 
reasons, weren't able to play varsity sports, but 
who greatly benefitted from participating on a 
freshmen team. However, people participating in 
freshman sports shouldn't be penalized if they 
don't have enough people to compete in team sports. 
In addition, in team sports, where a particular style 
of play may be very important to the success of 
the school's program, freshman year may be very 
important." Mr. Stuckey implied that the ideas 
Amheret and MIT had implemented are very good. 
But he also considered their abrupt termination of 
the February, 1969 agreement as "an act of ex- 
pediency rather than principal, morally bankrupt." 
To solve the newly created problem of the future 
of frosh sports, Bowdoin is going to propose that 
freshman may legally participate in varsity sports. 
It appears that a little ex post facto legalization 
will assuage injured feelings. 



Two performances and two 
choirs are among the innovations 
arranged for Bowdoin College's 
annual Christmas Concert Sun- 
day in the Walker Art Building. 

The Bowdoin College Choir, di- 
rected by Professor Rodney J. 
Rothlisberger, will be joined by 
the visiting Smith College Choir, 
directed by Lawrence A. Doebler, 
in a program of sacred music. 

As he has done for many years, 
Professor Athern P. Daggett will 
read the Christmas Scripture. An- 
other highlight of the program 
will be a joint performance by the 
Smith and Bowdoin choirs of Jos- 
eph Haydn's "Kleine Orgelmesse" 
for chorus, soloists, string en- 
semble and organ. 

The audience will be invited to 
join in the singing of traditional 
Christmas Carols. Each of the 
Vespers programs will be pre- 
ceded by a 15-minute chimes re- 
cital on the Bowdoin College 
Chapel Chimes. 



Stowe Travel 
Agency 

9 Pleasant Street 
Brunswick, Maine 

CHRISTMAS GREYHOUND 
SPECIAL BUS 

Non-Stop to Boston 
Leaves Moultoo Union on 
Wednesday, November 17, 
12:30 P.M. 

725-5573 



"NO SENATE VOICES have been 
raised more loudly in criticism of 
Swollen Pentagon Budgets than 
those ol Jacob Javits and Charles 
Goodell. Then came the news that 
military expenditures would be 
trimmed by liquidating 300 ob- 
solete bases — among them half a 
dozen located in New York. And 
no Senate voices were raised more 
loudly in criticism of Irrespon- 
sible Pentagon^ For a free copy of 



Cutbacks than 
. . . you guessed 
it." 



NATIONAL RE- 
VIEW, writ*: Dept. 
W. ISO E. 33 Street, 
N. Y. 10016. 



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We've Got What YOU Want 

142 Maine Street 



FREE XMAS WRAPPING 
WITH $3.50 PURCHASE 



The Moulton Union Bookstore Staff 

Takes This Opportunity To 
Wish To AU The Bowdoin College 

Students — Faculty 
A VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS 




PAGE SIX 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. DECEMBER 12, 1969 




ARGONAUT 
CRAFTS 

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Brunswick, Maine 

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Bridge's rushing tide. Owners 
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year round. 

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gifts — Touch of the nautical 
— Exotic imports — Maine 
Crafts — Surfboards — Lob- 
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3 Miles South of ('(ink's Corner 

l»-a MOX. thru SAT. 



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PHONE 725-2521 








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Sunday to Thursday — 4 P.M. to Midnight 

DELICIOUS PIZZA • HOT OVEN GRINDERS 

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You'll never get anywhere without it. 



Nothing helps a young engineer's 
career like being given a challenge. 
Which is another way of saying a chance 
to fail now and then. To make his own 
mistakes. 

At Western Electric we give our newly 
recruited engineers responsibility almost 
immediately. They make their own de- 
cisions. Learn from their own errors. 

Don't get us wrong. We keep our 



demands reasonable enough so that our 
recruits can make their decisions at their 
own pace. But our thinking is, a man 
feels awfully good about even a small 
decision when it's his. 

If you're the type who'd like the chance 
to make your own moves, see our recruiter 
or write College Relations, 222 Broad- 
way, New York, N. Y. 10038. 

A lot of hard work never hurt anyone. 



® 



Western Electric 

Manufacturing and Supply Unit o( the Bell System 
An Equal Opportunity Employer 



Student Course . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 



a reaction to Bowdoin's tradition- 
al curriculum. The hope is that by 
elimination of the normal stu- 
dent-professor relationships, real 
educational benefits will be real- 
ized. It is recognized by all pro- 
ponents of the plan that the 
course can only succeed if the 
classroom psychology differs radi- 
cally from the college norm. To 
quote the course's synopsis, "in- 
teraction of student and instruc- 
tor will result in a course where 
the gap between 'teachers' and 
students is virtually non-exist- 
ent." 

The assumptions on which trfis""* 
course is based have not gone un- 
challenged. Many aspects of the 
course havd aroused criticism. 
Most fundamentally, some facul- 
ty members have expressed a 
priori doubts about the compe- 
tence of any sophomore to teach 
any course to his peers. Other 
teachers have questioned the stu- 
dents' understanding and ability 
to meet the challenge inherent in 
any interdisciplinary instruction. 
It is obvious that eight instructors 
of very limited expertise are not 
equivalent to one instructor of 
broad expertise. The problem of 
presenting any sort of coherent . 
overview in a course of this sort 
has proved difficult in the past. 
Other faculty reservations con- 
cern course particulars : the grad- 
ing system, prerequisites, and the 
advisability of. the long indepen- 
dent study period. 

The claim of the instructors is 
that the course cannot be judged 
by traditional standards. The 
goals of the course as well as the 
techniques employed differ radi- 
cally from the means and ends of 
traditional curricula. The course 
requires either Gov. 21 or History * 
34 or the consent of the instruc- 
tors for admission. It is hoped 
that students will bring with 
them an authentic enthusiasm 
and curiosity as wfell as a degree 
of subject knowledge. In the final 
analysis, the course's success will 
be determined by the extent of 
commitment of the individuals in- 
volved. 



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A N 



FRIDAY. DECEMBER 12, 1969 



• ( 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 



And On Other Campuses jlii- It's that time again .^ 




Change the Pentagonal! 



Photo Laker Donated - 

A QUEEN FOR ALL SEA30NS. After being selected Miss UNH 
1970, Wllnia Thornapple, '78, was denounced by radical factions as 
characterizing "male chauvenlsm and the cattlization of women" in 
a contest which purportedly elected a queen highly misrepresentative 
of the campus. While not agreeing with dissenters politically, she con- 
sented to show her true diversity of character and versatility in adapt- 
ing to any circumstance. Wilma here demonstrates that she can indeed 
represent any faction without difficulty. The 18-year-old dean's list 
student Is pictured above at a recent party held in her honor. She is 
escorted by her Prince Regent (left) and a "High" Chancellor. 



By MARTiN FRIEDLANDER 

Orient Sports Editor 

It's too bad that this year's varsity hockey seniors 
may never get the chance to play in an ECAC 
championship tournament. It's too bad that they 
may have to share the same fate dealt to last year's 
seniors when they graduated after playing for a 
season as the number one ECAC hockey team in 
the eastern college division. And finally, it's too bad 
that the college community and alumni may never 
get to enjoy the publicity and possible rewards 
that come with participating in an ECAC tourna- 
ment. And all of this because the college is obliged 
to abide by a clause in an agreement based on one 
school's misfortune and a generally inapplicable 
ruling. 

Dartmouth, one of the pentagonal has seen fit to 
remove itself from the restrictive clause, and the 
students at Bowdoin, as well as Amherst and Wil- 
liams, have for the past two years presented circu- 
lations representing 70% of their total numbers to 
administration officials showing their dissatisfac- 
tion with the agreement. This year the ball has once 
again been set in motion, and it is hoped that some 
action will make a reality the dreams of every 
hockey player and fan in their respective college 
communities, particularly Bowdoin. 

The arguments against post-season play certain- 
ly seem convincing ... for some people, at any rate. 
Some say that pest-season tournaments such as 
this one can result in aggravation, undue costs, and 
excessive stress on the players. This is said with 
one particular case in mind; an instance when one 
member cf the pentagonal sent a championship 
basketball team to the mid-west for the playoffs 



and discovered they weren't quite as good as they 
had thought they yere, and also that Mid-western 
sportsmanship was not quite up to New England 
ethics. * 

As it might stand at the season's end, the hockey 
tournament that Bowdoin would be eligible to play- 
in will be at one of the leagues schools (and this is 
by ECAC ruling). Logistically speaking, this means 
that all of the possible contenders for the champion- 
ship would be within 300 miles of Bowdoin ... no 
further than the farthest typical weekend road 
trip. The play-offs would come at the immediate 
end of the season, thereby not overlapping with any 
succeeding sports season — an argument protest- 
ing the undue pressure that would be placed on the 
students who played hockey as well as a spring 
spcrt. Sports such as swimming and track, where 
the individual is permitted to compete in post sea- 
son games, the "stress" is obviously not enough to 
warrant banning of the activities. The logic behind 
this argument is certainly questionable. 

Though Presidents Howell and Plimpton (of Am- 
herst) have expressed interest in lifting the ban in 
past years, it is primarily the responsibility of the 
students agitate for revision. Each school involved 
shculd be contacted, and petitions circulated at 
each one, not only Bowdoin. Concise formulation of 
a new policy, accounting for possible difficulties 
shculd be presented along with petitions. 

Action on revision has not come in the past, de- 
spite student petitions, approval of Director of 
Athletics Stuckey and President Howell, and the 
enthusiasm and talent offered by the teams in- 
volved. It is an absurd situation when these condi- 
tions exist and the policy stagnates. It is definitely 
time for change. 



Interfrat Football Playoffs Icemen Down Boston State; 
Postponed Due To Weather Entertain Army Saturday 



As in past years, snows and heavy rains have postponed the 
end of this year's interfraternity football season. Only one play- 
off game for the title has been played so far, and with Christmas 

vacation and heavy snows immi- 



Merry Christmas. 

Alan 

and when * 

Shopping . . . 

Support 

Your 

Orient 

Advertisers 



nent, it is doubtful that the re- 
sults will be known until next 
spring. 

In regular play, the Beta power 
house had the best season, ending 
with a 5-0 record for their divi- 
sion. Alpha Kappa Sigma, Psi Up- 
silon and Chi Psi held a three-way 
tie for second place with 4-1 rec- 
ords. 

Beta overcame a tough Chi Psi 
team in the only play-off game 
this season and in the process 
relegated the defeated squad to 
fourth position. Beta now moves 
on to the championship game 
probably to be played in the spring 
against either Kappa Sigma or 
Psi Upsilon, depending upon the 
winner of that play-off. 



By MICHAEL A. ZIMMAN 

For the Orient 

The Bowdoin College icemen opened their defense of the E.C.A.C. Division II crown with 
a come-from-behind victory over Boston State at the Boston Arena Wednesday eve. Sopho- 
more John Bradley had a fine night in the cage coming up with 29 saves, many of them spectac- 
ular. The Bear goals came off the 
sticks of Tom Lea in the second 
period and Ed Good and Bobby 
Hall in the final stanza. 



Polar Bearings 



vs. Boston State Tues. 4:00 
Swimming 

Bowdoin 35 Spring-field 

0-1 

vi. V Mass Sat. 2:00 

Bowdoin Fr. 54 Springfield 

1-0 

vs. Huntington Prep. 12:00 

Track 

Varsity vs. UNH Jan. 10 

Frosh vs. UNH Jan. 10 

Squash 



GO 



36 



Bowdoin 



0-1 



Harvard JV 



Basketball 
55 UNH 

81 Amherst 

0-2 
at Wesleyan Sat. 
76 UNH 

83 MCI 

l-l 
vs. Exeter Sat. 3:00 
Hockey 

3 Boston 'State 

1-0 

vs. Army Sat. 7:30 
Bowdoin Fr. 2 Harvard 

Bowdoin Fr. 5 Card. Gushing 



Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 



Bowdoin Fr. 
Bowdoin Fr. 



Bowdoin 



71 
N 



80 
80 



SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 
OPPORTUNITIES 



If you want assistance in obtaining summer 
employment, see Mr. Moulton in the « 

Student Aid Office. 

This year the Student Aid Office will attempt to help 
students secure summer jobs through Bowdoin alumni. 
If you are interested, sign up in the Student Aid Office so 
your name will be available to alumni on a referral basis. 



The first period saw Bowdoin 
off to a slow start. The passing 
was erratic, perhaps due to the 
first game jitters. Dick Leahy 
opened the scoring at 8:07 foV 
Boston State on a power play 
goal. Boston lead 1-0 at the end 
of the first period. 

Locking like a different team 
Bowdoin came roaring out of the 
locker room and after peppering 
the Boston net Tom Lea tallied 
at 4:56 with an assist from Bob 
Maxwell. Boston's Leahy scored 
again at 15:16 permitting State 
to carry a 2-1 lead into the lock- 
ers. 

However Bowdoin seemed to 

have the momentum and at 2:01 
of the third period Ed Good tied 
things up with a hard slap shot 
that deflected off the Boston 
goalie's glove over his shoulder 
and into the cage. Linemate Jim 
Block and co-captain Erl Hardy 
were credited with assists. Bobby 
Ha'l scored the clincher on a tip- 
in from Ed Good at 13:20. Bob 
Petrie also assisted. 

Ice Inkles 

Coach Sid Watson felt that the 
game was "a real team effort" 
... he cited John Bradley for an 
outstanding job in the nets . . . 
Bowdoin lived up to its program 
billing of 'big and burly" with" 
eight penalties . . . sophomore 
Coley King was a bright spot on 
defense . 4 . neither team could 
capitalize on two man up situa- 
tions . . . the final outcome of the 
cancelled Hamilton game is still 
up in the air . . . next game: un- 
defeated (3-0) Army Saturday 
night. 



PAGE EIGHT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. DECEMBER 12. 1969 



Swimmers Host U Mass; Jeffs Edge Bears 89-81; 
Look For First Victory 



Cardinals Warm Nest Sat. 

By BRIAN DAVIS 



The varsity swim team suffered a defeat at the hands of a powerful Springfield contingent 
last Saturday, but the prospects of evening the record with a win over the University of Massa- 
chusetts look good for this weekend. 

The 60-35 defeat by Springfield was a result of a lack in depth. Bowdoin won four individ- P'T^ R° A *' A*! ^TaTT f ?u ^AO* • SS D ^'u ^ 
vents to Springfield's five handed Bowdoin the second defeat of the 69- 70 Bear basket- 



Orient Sports Writer 

Action at the Morrell Gymnasium last Saturday evening 
proved to be at best disheartening, as Amherst's Lord 



ual events tg Springfield's five, 
with each team winning a relay. 
The lop-sided meet score resulted 
from the fact that Springfield 
swept four events, while the 
Bears swept none, Pete Robinson 
gaining Bowdoin's only second 
place in the tightly contested 200 

fly. 

Bowdoin's firsts were taken by 
Parker Barnes in the 200 and 100 
yard freestyle events, Ken Ryan 
in his specialty, the 200 Individu- 
al Medley, and by a strong sopho- 
more diver, John Wendler. In 
winning the diving, Wendler up- 
set Springfield's high school All- 
American, Laing. The winning 
freestyle relay was composed of 
Barnes, Jeff Meehan, Simon Ed- 
kins, and Robinson. All of Bow- 
doin's individual firsts were won 
in performances far superior to 
those of last year at this time. 

Pete Robinson performed well 
against very tough competition to 
produce a second and a third, also 
anchoring Bowdoin's winning re- 
lay. John McPhillips, Barry Stev- 
ens, and Bow Quinn performed 
well, turing in their best times for 
this season. 

The pool record in the 200 yard 
breaststroke was lowered to 2:21.2 
by New England record holder 
Doug Moulton, one of the Spring- 
field co-captains. The mark was 
previously held . by Van Oss of 
Amherst when he swam the race 
in last .season's contest with Bow- 
doin. 

With continued good perform- 
ances the Bears should emerge 
victorious from Saturday's con- 
test with U Mass, evening out the 
record to 1-1. Massachusetts will 
suffer from last June's loss of two 
graduating seniors who paced the 
team with their performances in 
the freestyle sprints and the In- 
dividual Medlay. Thus far this 
season, the team has not appeared 
particularly strong in other 
meets. 

It was against Springfield that 
team captain John Spencer made 
his first winning appearance since 
breaking his wrist over the sum- 
mer. The Bowdoin squad's leading 
distance man, Spencer should be 
in racing condition by the end of 
Christmas vacation when the 
team returns to fac UNH on Jan- 
uary 10. 

Bowdoin vs. Springfield 
400 Medlay Relay: 1. Spring-field (Sprack- 

lin, Salter. LaPointe, Kurea). 3:56.6. 
200 Freestyle: 1. Barnea <B). 2. Kaynor 

(S), 3. Lapahant (S). t— 1:58.1. 
50 Freestyle: 1. Meyer (8). 2. Call (S), 

3. Robinson (B). t— 23.3 
ZOO Medlay: 1. Ryan <B>. 2. St. Pierre 

(S). 3. Roach (S). t— 2:11.6 
Diving: 1. Wendler .(B), 2. Lain*- <S>. 

Donnolley <S>. 77.03 pts. 
200 Butterfly: 1. Lynch (S), 2. Robinson 

(B). 3. Quinn (B). t— 2:11.5 
100 Freestyle: 1. Barnes (B), 2. O'Meara 

(S), 3. Scott (S). t— 50.8 
200 Backstroke: 1. Spraeklin (S). 2. Gar- 
diner (S). 3. Stuart (Bl. t — 2:12.5 
500 Freestyle: 1. Puftell (S), 2. Van 

Buren (S). 3. Profin (B). t— 5:20.5 
200 Breaststroke: 1. Moulton (S>, 2. 

Kleitz (St. 3. Kvan (B). t— 2:21.3 

(Bowdoin College Pool Record) 
400 Freestyle Relay: 1. Bowdoin (Barnes. 

Meehan. Edkint, Robinson), t — 3:33 
Bowdoin 35 Springfield 60 

Lose MIT opener . 




FACES IN THE CROWD ... as a new winter sports season takes off this weekend. 

Frosh set records . . . 



Erikson Leads Meet in 500 



For the first time in modern Bowdoin swimming 
history, the freshman squad defeated a Springfield 
team. However, it wasn't only the 54-36 victory that 
gave Coach Charlie Butt reason to be happy — two 
of his freshman swimmers also set new freshman 
and pool records. 

Distance freestyler John Ericson shaved six- 
tenths of a second off of the college pool record 
with his own mark of 5:19, only 2.9 seconds shy of 
the college record, set in 1965 by T. Robinson, var- 
sity swimmer Pete Robinson's older brother. This 
was Erikson's first attempt at the 500 record. The 
high school All New York State swimmer also 
placed first in the 200 freestyle with a time of 
1:55.9, setting a new freshman record in that event, 
too. 



The other freshman record setter in the meet 
was Rick Haudel who turned in a 2:13.0 in the 200 
yard Butterfly. The team's two other first-place 
grabbers were Rick Lucas in the 50 free and Nic 
Carson in the 200 Backstroke. The squad's 400 yard 
medlay relay team of Carson, John Ward, Haudel, 
and John Doran started the meet's pace when they 
took seven points unopposed by a Springfield con- 
tingent. 

The cubs' weak spot was in the diving, where they 
posted no contestants. This means that the squad 
donates eight points each meet by not competing 
in the diving events. In all other events, the team 
promises to be one of the best freshman swimming 
. squads ever to work out in the Curtis pool. The 
, team's next encounter is this afternoon against 
Huntington Prep. 4 



Time it was and what a time it was . . . 

it was . . . 

a time of innocence, a time of confidence . . . 

* 
Season's Greetings and 

Best Wishes for a Healthy 

a Happy New Year 

. . . tfce Orient Staff 



ball season. The "home opener" 
featured two teams that were ap- 
parently evenly matched (at least 
physically). 

Although considerably slower, 
the Lord Jeffs seemed to react 
more confidently than the Bears 
when handling the ball. Also, the 
Bowdoin squad found itself ham- 
pered by rebounding problems. Si- 
milar to UNH, Amherst was hold- 
ing the Bear's offensive attack to 
one shot a drive and a large ma- 
jority of these shots were from 
the outside. Unfortunately, Bow- 
doin failed to dominate defensive 
rebounding as well, thus allowing 
the Jeffs more opportunities to 
score. The 52-45 half-time score, 
however, was far from determin- 
ing the trend of the contest. 

At the half Bowdoin has ac- 
quired only seven team fouls to 
Amherst's fourteen. The second 
half turned the tables in' the foul 
department, as the Bears lost the 
services of Steve Theroux and 
Steve Carey due to foul accumu- 
lations. Bowdoin's greatest 
threat, although the score was 
never in favor of the Bears, came 
with seven minutes left in the 
game. After being down by elev- 
en points, the Bears came back 
to within one point cf the Lord 
Jeffs. This drive was only mo- 
mentary as Amherst's rebounding 
power stalled both Bowdoin's of- 
fensive and defensive fife. The 
high scorer of the game for the 
Bears was Clark Young. But 
Young's twenty points were not 
enough, as Amherst outscored 
Bowdoin, 89-81. 

Saturday, Bowdoin will be 
hosted by Wesleyan in Middle- 
town. Although the season is still 
young, the Bears feel a win now 
would be invaluable for the re-, 
mainder of the schedule. 

The Queen — now can you 

guess who that could 

be 
(She's a little girl 

by day, but at night 

she steals away)? 
Well - 

. . . Rose Fyleman 



Frosh Down MCI Wed.; 
Cub Hoopsters At 1-1 

By WILLIARD T. BUSHEY - . 

Orient Sports Writer 

The freshman basketball team evened its record to 1-1 last Wednes- 
day with a victory over MCI. The closing minutes of the game proved 
to be extremely tense ones, but Coach Coombs' freshmen held on to 
win, 83-80. , — T- 



Weight lifters Meet Lisbon 



In their first match in eight years, the newly re- 
organized Bowdoin Weightlifting Club lost to a 
more experienced MIT club, 119-71. last Saturday 
in the DuPont Athletic Building in Cambridge. 

Led by the state record holder of Iowa, Joel Mos- 
her, the Engineers jumped to a commanding 52-12 
lead by gaining first and second place finishes in the 
press and bench press. The inexperienced Polar 
Bear team held the Engineers even in the deadlift, 
squat, snatch, and clean and jerk, but the early 
lead proved too large to overcome. 

Team captain Rick Spill took the only first for 
the visitors as he captured a victory in the squat 
with a life of 385 pounds. John Benson finished as 
the meet's high scorer with 29 points from three 



seconds, a third, and a fifth. Spill finished second 
with 21 points. Also scoring for Bowdoin were Doug 
Sewall, Ray Bouchard, and Dick Hardej. 

The meet was scored on the basis of 10-7-5-4-3-2-1 
points for the first seven lifts in each lift, respect- 
ively. According to the "Hoffman formula" each 
lifter was assigned a co-efficient calculatee to en- 
able the smaller men to compete with the heavy- 
weights on an equal basis. This co-efficient was 
multiplied by the poundage each man lifted and the 
resultant score determined the places. 

This Sunday the squad travels to Lisbon to face 
the Lisbon Barbell Club and the Naval Air Station 
Team in a triangular meet. The team's first home 
match will be January 10. 



However, two weeks ago the 
squad was not quite so perse- 
vering as they bowed to UNH, 
76-80 in their season opener. The 
cubs' hard fought game was paced 
by the scoring of Kip Crowley 
who poured in 32 points and guard 
Lee Arris who hit for 17. 

A fast moving squad, the frosh 
are led by guards Arris and Frank 
Campagnone, forwards Kip Crow- 
ley and Gerry Lewis, and cente? 
Kevin Douglas. Other men who 
will see action this season are 
Ken Toliver. Dick Cartland, ( John 
Redman. Mark Ginn, Dick Nylon, 
Clay White, Mike Knell, and Ed 
Kaezerian. 

On top of the scoring honors 
for the squad, along with Crow- 
ley and Arris*! is Campagnone who 
sunk 24 points in a recent scrim- 
mage against Brunswick High 
School. The Polar Bear Cubs won. 
82-41. 

The frosh host MIT Tuesday 
evening in the Morrell Gymnasi- 



um at 6:00 in their final pre-va- 
cation play. The schedule picks up 
again January 10 when they tra- 
vel to Andover for competition 
there. 



Sports This 
Weekend 

Friday 

Fr. Swim vs. Huntington 2:30 

Saturday 

Swim vs. U Mass 2:00 

Wrestling vs. Amherst 2:00 

Hockey vs. Army 7:30 

Fr. Basketball vs. Exeter 3:00 




Bontemps Seeks Roots For King In Harlem Renaissance 



By PAUL BATISTA 

The Harlem Renaissance, beginning in 1917 and end- 
ing after a decade, produced poetry originally pub- 
lished in little magazines: standard periodicals and 
firms did not accept what Arna Bontemps yesterday 
identified as "captivity literature." It was an effort to 
find a form or topic that would be published at all. For 
example, Frank Yerby wrote during the Depression a 
novel about black life; it was rejected, "and sometimes 
savagely criticized," by many publishers. The experi- 
ence was common. Yerby then produced a novel in 
which no blacks appeared, a sleight of hand so com- 
plete that the book sold over a million copies, as have 
all of Yerby's later ones. 

Bontemps sensed the same frustrations about reach- 
ing an adult audience that was largely white. So his 
own device was to write for children, "for the sixth 
and seventh grade." "I would address myself to minds 
that were not so firmly set." Bontemps added: "At the 
time the minds of adult Americans were substantially 
closed, Americans in general were so hardened, atti- 
tudes were so crystallized." He wrote for children 
"Lonesome Boy," "Sad-faced Boy," and "Golden Slip- 
pers," among others, a captivity literature that like 



Countee Cullen's "can serve as a metaphor for the hu- 
man experience." It is, for him, a gentle dreamy human 
experience: the style of the man and his work reflect 
this. It is a style that has, of course, suffered reversals. 
Also reversed has been the need to find an acceptable 
style, form, or topic for the black writer, to write pop- 
ular novels about whites or to compose children's 
stories. What has also developed is the belief that 
black writing cannot be criticized from the basis of 
white critical standards; one recalls critic Richard Gil- 
man saying that Eldridge Cleaver writes about so many 
things that Gilman, who is white, cannot understand. 
Criticized at times as sentimental and derivative, 
the Harlem Renaissance has become the heart of the 
black republication, as books by Hughes, Toomer and 
others have been reissued. It involved a very large out- 
pouring of poetry and prose. Bontemps was one of the 
movement's leading figures. Countee Cullen was an- 
other. And Jean Toomer, whose novel Cane was recent- 
ly reissued, and the poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. Arna 
Bontemps attracts as one of the only surviving figures 
of the movement. Currently he is a lecturer in Ameri- 
can Studies at Yale and curator of the James Weldon 
Johnson Memorial Collection. 



Yesterday he discussed "Hold Fast to Dreams:" It' 
may have been a poem in prose, a child's story, an ex- 
tended homily. It was not to be completely associated 
with Martin Luther King's speech at the Washington 
Monument in 1963. But there was an association. King 
used patterns of speech from rural preachers in the 
south and from the poetry of the Harlem Renaissance. 
A Langs ton Hughes poem supplied the content and 
form for King's speech. "King was' immersed in our 
poetry," Bontemps said. "He projected that attitude. 
His style of speaking was not original with him." 

Bontemps said that there have (been periodic up- 
surges in the literature of captivity. "We are now in 
a period," said Bontemps, "of revival and revolution, 
of real ferment." The Harlem Renaissance explains a 
number of things about the literature: it explains the 
language and the mood. Bontemps said, 'This is a peri- 
od of inspired action, of demonstration. It bears a real 
relation to the stage." Lorainne Hansberry's "A Raisin 
in the Sun" started the current emphasis on black 
drama in the middle fifties. Bontemps suggested an 
indebtedness to the Harlem Renaissance. "Dreams are 
back in style." 



THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 



VOLUME XCIX 



#0*9 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. 

■ttSSSSKBESEIESBaSSSSSS 



BRUNSWICK. MAINE. FRIDAY, JANUARY 16.. 1970 



NUMBER It 



Two Undergrads Named 
To Board Of Overseers 



A representative of the col- 
announced today that two 
undergraduates, Lewis D. Ep- 
tein '73 and Kenneth Vincent 
Santagata '73, had been 
elected to the Board of Over- 
seers. They are the first stu- 
dents to be elected to the Gov- 
erning Boards in Bowdoin's 
175 year history. 

Epstein and Santagata are ex- 
pected to attend and vote at the 
February meeting of the Govern- 
ing Boards at which the crucial 
reforms of co-education, an in- 
crease in enrollment, and the re- 



vamping of the curriculum will 
be considered. 

A spokesmen of the college said 
of the unprecedented appoint- 
ment, "I am pleased that under- 
graduates will be members of the 
Governing Boards. It was a shame 
to believe that a board, whose 
average age is 60 or 65, could pro- 
duce the reforms necessary to 
progressive education. Perhaps 
now, Bowdoin can make the 
meaningful adjustments due such 
an institution. . . ." Epstein and 
Santagata were unavailable for 
comment. 



Afro- Am Center Opens 
-Commemorates King 



By JEFF DRUMMOND 
One of the objectives for the 
Afro-American Center which 
opened yesterday was to deepen 
the cultural identity of the blacks 
at Bowdoin College. As the 
Bowdoin Alumnus says: the house 
"should help make the black stu- 
dent aware and proud of his heri- 
tage and it should convey to the 
white community an understand- 
ing of that heritage and an ap- 
preciation of the contributions of 
black men to world culture." Ob- 
viously, "a college can never iso- 
late itself from the social condi- 
tions in which it operates, (ami) 
without black students to learn 
from, the whites would leave 
Bowdoin ill-equipped to cope with 
racism or social injustice." 

It was in this spirit of recogniz- 
ing the need for reconciliation of 
blacks with whites that the Bow- 
doin Center for Afro-ATnferican 
Studies was formally inaugurated 



on the birthday anniversary of 
Dr. Martin Luther King, .Jr. 
When Richard Adams, '73, first 
thought of opening the house on 
that day, he was hoping that the 
day would become a day of na- 
tional observance. The Afro-Am 
organization consequently con- 
tacted other Af ro-Ams at 450 col- 
leges and universities, and the 



could not attend due to sodden 
illness. Her performance, which 
was a benefit for a scholarship 
fund for black students, will 
hopefully be re-scheduled for 
March. 

The activities began at nine 
o'clock with registration for the 
workshops, or seminars, which 
were to be conducted at one that 



Colleges, High Schools Praise 
Elimination Of College Boards 




By JOHN WEISS 

Earlier this semester the faculty of Bowdoin de- 
cided to eliminate the SAT and CEEB requirement 
for admissions- The new school policy, sponsored 
by Director of Admissions Richard Moll, states 
that these tests are optional. Early in December 
Mr. Moll sent many letters to secondary schools, 
colleges, and universities explaining Bowdoin's new 
policy on standardized tests. The replies have 
been overwhelmingly favorable. In fact many of 
the responses Mr. Moll has received approve even 
substantial changes in the educational process and 
in educational administration. 

A representative sampling of quotes from secon- 
dary school responses indicates how favorably 
Bowdoin's new policy has been received. A secon- 
dary school councilor from Hudson, Ohi owrote: 
"Your report about eliminating the CEEB require- 
ment just arrived, and it is an excellent one. 
Might your secretary send me fifty or so more 

copies " V 

From Wiscasset, Maine: 

"May I take the opportunity to commend you and 

Bowdoin for your courage to decomputerize the ad- 



missions scene in the face of overwhelming pres- 
sure to do everything by the numbers." 
Kingston, Pennsylvania replied: 
Now, if only the other colleges would follow Bow- 
doin's footsteps, then we at the secondary school 
level would be greatly helped. Needless to say, 
students would be too. Perhaps the millenium 
would be reached if ranking and grades would go 
by the window. A most pleasant thought. 
Director of admission at East Brunswick, New 
Jersey; We have felt for some time that these 
'tests have been given undo emphasis by many col- 
leges. . . . and therefore we applaud your efforts to 
base your decisions on more meaningful criteria. 
From Exeter, New Hampshire: 
. . .my hearty congratulations for having the cour- 
age and the wisdom to set precedent. As optional 
criteria they will serve us — as required criteria 
they have ruled us! 

The headmaster of a boarding school in Metaire, 
Louisiana wrote: 

I have long felt that the emphasis on CEEB-SAT 

scores had become unrealistic. I am certain that 

(PU«»« turn to page S) 



Student Council wrote to the stu- 
dent government of more than 
800 educational institutions, urg- 
ing them to hold similar cere- 
monies. Several important of- 
ficials, including Senator Ed- 
mund Muskie, were invited. 

On January 9, Governor Ken- 
neth Curtis of Maine proclaimed 
January 15th "Martin Luther 
King, Jr., Day," specifying that 
the Student Council and the Af- 
ro-American Society of Bowdoin 
have urged Jan. 15th to be set 
aside as a national holiday "in 
memory of Dr. King and the 
ideals for which he lived and 
died." Edmund Muskie also 
sent a telegram supporting the 
idea and the Center; unfortunate- 
ly, he had to be in Chicago on 
that day. 

The other major disappoint- 
ment of the day was that Miss 
Mahalia Jackson, gospel singer. 



afternoon. Then at ten, in the 
first formal ceremony of the day. 
President Howell gave the keys 
of the Center to Paul Wiley, 
Vice-President of the Society, 
and House Manager. Howell 
spoke for a few minutes on what 
he believed the purpose of the 
Center to be. As a focus for 
black ideas and education on die 
Bowdoin campus, the Center is 
supposed to deepen the cultural 
identity of the blacks, and at the 
same time, by exposing the white 
student to black ideas, "to serve 
a deep and crucial need for the 
white student." "King's ideals 
of humanism and love for fellow 
man are necessary in the society 
we now have; we moat discard 
them as we "grow inwardly and 
search deep within ourselves" for 
a brotherly love. Above all, we 
most "accelerate growth of gen- 






it. 



PAGE TWO 



THE'BOWDOIN ORIENT 



•FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1970 



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By ALAN KOLOD 

Wednesday the Curriculum and 
Educational Policy Committee ap- 
proved a modified version of the 
proposed student-taught Govern- 
ment 22 course. The CEP will re- 
port its action to the Faculty 
Monday. The proposed course was 
originally to be offered by the 
eight Sophomores under the 
loose supervision of Professors 
Rensenbrink and Lewis and stu- 
dents were to be graded under a 
pass-fail system by their student- 
instructors. This plan was at- 
tacked, however, by members of 
the faculty who questioned the 
teaching competence of the eight- 
and the wisdom of allowing them 
to grade their fellow students. 

In crder to meet the objections 
of the faculty as expressed by 
the CEP, the government depart- 



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ment agreed to sponsor the 
course as one of its regular of- 
ferings. Professor Rensenbrink 
and Lewis will be formally re- 
sponsible fcr teaching the course. 
Randy Curtis, one of the eight, 
explained that this means they 
will advise the student instruc- 
tors on the selection of course 
materials, will grade the instruc- 
tors, and, with the assistance of 
the student-instructors will 
grade those enrolled in the 
ccurse. In addition, grades will be 
given under the present rather 
than the proposed pass-fail sys- 
tem. 

Some of the eight regarded the 
changes as trivial and beside the 
point, though they were disap- 
pointed that grades would not be 
pass-fail. One student thought it 
ircnic that the faculty questioned 
the sutdents' ability to teach and 
then insisted grades be as precise 
as, possible. 

Professor Rensenbrink has 
written in praise of the course: 
"I have observed six free semi- 
nar sessions in which the eight 
proposers in different groups of 
two or three led the closs. They 
did very creditably. The sessions 
were characterized by open-ness, 
full discussion, and — most im- 
portant in my estimation a 
steady persistence in fully ex- 
ploring major themes rather than 
getting off on side issues. From 
my knowledge of their approach 
it is evident to me that they do 
not intend to put on the mantle 
or airs Master-Professor, but 
neither are they interested ia 
acting as presiders over bull ses- 
sions. They have a serious desire 
to communicate and guide, to 
raise problems, and to cooperate 
with their fellow students in ex- 
ploring and where possible in 
.'finding answers to these prob- 
lems."' 

"I strongly recommend that 
this course be approved by the 
CEP and by the Faculty. I say 
this both because it is a very 
valuable experiment and because 
it promises to be something good 
in itself. 

These young people have some 
things they want to share: things 
like data, materials, tentative 
analyses of social forces in a 
nonwestern setting, suggested 
models of how to understand the 
(Please turn to page .">) 



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FRIDAY. JANUARY 16, I9Z0 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE THREE 



\ 




Committee On Admissions 
Investigates Coeducation 



NEWSMAKERS: Rhode* scholar Brace Gate (Me page 1) and Adudwlo— 
Saunders has been named to succeed Robert Ives as an assistant In the Admissions Office. The Job will run 
from "June to June." After that he'll have to find his own college. Roger Renfrew has also been named as 
an assistant. He will only work this summer In the Admissions Office. 



At their annual meeting in 
June, Bowdoin's Governing 
Boards will deal with a report 
that, if implemented, will change 
the essential nature of the col- 
lege. Coeducation, Bowdoin's 
mass erotic fantasy, will be pre- 
sented in precise terms of why, 
how, and how much. And, hope- 
fully, when. 

Last year the Boards voted to 
increase the enrollment of the 
College to 1200. The means of 
effecting this increase, and, there- 5 
by the question of coeducation, 
were left open. The Committee 
on Coeducation, a subcommittee 
of the Committee on Admissions, 
is currently finding the answers 
to that question. As Chairman 
Edward Geary makes clear, the 
answers are not easy. At well 
as presenting the arguments for 
and against coeducation, Geary's 
committee must accurately define 
and evaluate the institutional 
problems presented by such a 



King Holiday Passed; 
Hanoi Is Petitioned 



Radiation Affects DNA 



By FRED CI SICK 

The Student Council passed a 
resolution last Monday night 
calling on the Governing Boards 
to declare Jan. 15, the birthday - 
cf Martin' Luther King, a college 
holiday. The resolution also 
called on the Boards to petition 
President Nixon and Congress to 
make Jan. 15 a national holiday. 
Harry Simmeth and John Mc- 
Phillips introduced a resolution, 
which was passed unanimously, 
calling for the humane treatment 
cf U.S. prisoners in North Viet- 
nam. *The resolution read: 
Whereas: There are presently 
upwards of 400 members of 
the American Armed Forces 
known to be captives of the 
Viet Cong and North Viet- 
namese; and 
Whereas: Evidence exists, that 
these prisoners are not ac- 
corded the full protection of 
the Geneva Convention con- 
cerning treatment of prison- 
ers; and 
Whereas: A gesture of reconcili- 
ation on the -part of Hanoi 
( concerning treatment of pris- 
oners may lead to increased 
sentiment on both sides in 
favor of ending the war and 
would be a commendably hu- 
manitarian act: 
Therefore be it resolved: 
That the Bowdoin Student 
Council undertake the following 
action regarding the Vietnam 
prisoner situation: 

1. That the Secretary of the 
Council be directed to 
write letters expressing 
the Council's concern to 
Xuan Thuy, head of the 
North Vietnamese delega- 
tion to the Paris talks, 
asking that Hanoi release 
the names of captives and 
permit inspection of pris- 
ons by the International 
Red Cross; 

2. That the Secretary, also, 
be directed to dispatch 
letters to Sens. Chase and 
Muskie and to Maine Con- 
gressmen calling for a 
joint congressional resolu- 
tion demanding proper 
treatment of prisoners 
and urging the President 
to undertake initives for 
prisoner exchanges at this 
time; 

3. That the Secretary send to 
the President a letter urg- 
ing such initiatives be un- 
dertaken; 

4. That the students be pro- 
vided with proper ad- 
dresses and urged to send 



similar letters to the 
above; 
5. That the Bowdoin Student 
Council undertake to en- 
list the aid of other col- 
lege student councils in 
furthering this effort. 
Bowdoin's first mixer is official- 
ly dead. The autopsy, performed 
at the Student Council meeting 
last Monday night, revealed that 
the patient had died of failure to 
contact ..the girls' schools soon 
enough, failure to phone schools 
instead of write, failure to time 
the mixer properly, "failure all 
around." The deceased left a 
debt of $250.00 which will be paid 
in part by the Council and in part 
by Blanket Tax. 

The Council also laid to rest the 
proposal of a company called Aca- 
demic Services Inc. which had 
asked to peddle its wares (student 
fare cards, student discount book- 
lets, discount record clubs, etc.) 
on campus with the help of the 
Council. The proposal was 
termed by one member as just 
"more garbage for the bulletin 
board." 

The election for the presidency 
of the junior class is scheduled to 
be held again after the Council 
voted that one of the candidates, 
Buzz Van Sanford, had accident- 
ally been omitted from the first 
ballot. A new election will be 
held next week. 



Schwartz Will 
Head West 

"Professor Elliott S. Schwartz 
of the Department of Music will 
be Visiting Lecturer at the Col- 
lege of Creative Studies at the 
University of California at Santa 
Barbara during the school's win- 
ter quarter. 

The award-winning composer 
has been commissioned by the 
College of Creative Studies to 
write a new work which will be 
premiered during his stay there 
from mid-December to early 
February. The new work is 
"Miniconcerto" and is scored for 
flute, oboe, violin, viola and' 
cello. 

While visiting the West Coast, 
Professor Schwartz will lecture 
and present a program at the 
University of California at San 
Diego, and will speak at the Uni- 
versity of Southern California 
and the University of Oregon. 



By SAUL. GREENFIELD 

Dr. Franklin Hutchinson of 
Yale University gave a lecture en- 
titled, "D.N. A. and Radiation" on 
Thursday, January 8. Dr. Hutch- 
inson was a member of the 
Chemistry Department at M.I.T. 
He was Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Biophysics at Yale. In 
the year 1963, he was a Guggen- 
heim Fellow at London Univer- 
sity. 

Dr. Hutchinson pointed out 
certain very practical reasons for 
studying ionizing radiation in ref- 
erence to cell behaviour. In the 
field of medicine, ionizing radia- 
tion is used to control cancerous 
tissue growth. Scientists are 
concerned about the effects of 
ionizing radiation on men during 
space travel, where there is no 
atmospheric shield against such 
radiation. A third definite rea- 
son for studying the effects of 
ionizing radiation is that as a re- 
sult scientists may learn a great 
deal more about the functionings 
of the cell. 

In the experiments carried out 
at Brookhaven National Labora- 
tory and elsewhere, scientists 



noticed that the only function of 
the cell markedly affected by 
radiation was the ability of the 
cell to replicate. Microbeam ex- 
periments were carried out, 
where the ionizing radiation was 
aimed at specific parts of the cell. 
Only when the beam hit the nu- 
cleus, was the cell affected. 

Dr. Hutchinson outlined some 
of the reasons why scientists 
4 ' suspected D.N.A. to be the af- 
fected -chemicle. One obvious 
fact was that most of the D.N.A. 
is in the nucleus. Scientists, 
through experimentation, proved 
that D.N.A. content has a defi- 
nite correlation to the level of 
radiation required to kill a cell. 
Scientists also replaced Thiamine, , 
one of the four major components 
of D.N.A., with another chemicle 
and observed changes in radia- 
tion sensitivity. Therefore, the 
conclusion was that D.N.A. is af- 
fected by ionizing radiation and 
plays a major role in cell behav- 
iour when subject to this radia- 
tion. Another outgrowth of this 
study was that scientists became 
aware of an enzyme system that 
repairs or attempts to repair 
damaged D.N.A. 



program. Expansion of College 
facilities in such areas as hous- 
ing, counselling, medical care, 
and physical education would cer- 
tainly be necessitated. Other 
problems, some of them far more 
complex, must also be solved. 
The departmental impact is one 
such problem. Where and how a 
significant number of girls would 
alter the Bowdoin curriculum is 
a question that Geary's commit- 
tee seeks to answer in dollars 
cents. Additionally, the commit- 
tee must make concrete proposals 
no where the girls would come 
from and how they would be in- 
tegrated into the four classes. 

Reports from other colleges, in- 
cluding Princeton and Williams, 
are being studied in an attempt 
to determine their relevance to 
the situation here. When the re- 
port is completed, it will be, to 
as great an extent as possible, 
definitive. It will be compared 
to alternative plans such as the 
establishment of a graduate stud- 
ies program and acted upon. In 
June the fantasizing will be over. 

Commager 
On College 

Amherst, Mass. — (I. P.) — 
The way to change society is 
through politics, not through the 
universities, according to noted 
historian Henry Steele Com- 
mager. 

"The university is the most 
unique and least corrupt institu- 
tion in society," he said. "Destroy 
it and you destroy civilization." 

Radical students who think 
they can capture the university 
and re-structure corrupt society 
from that base of operations are 
not realistic, according to Prof. 
Commager, who teaches Ameri- 
can government and history at 
Amherst College. He made it plain 
that American universities are not 
to blame for the war in Vietnam 
— "the university didn't start It 
and can't end it" — any more 
than they are for the problems of 
pollution, racism, overpopulation, 
urban blight or anything else. 
(Please turn to page 6) 



Freshmen Find Bowdoin Weak 
Socially, Stronger Academically 



By SAUL. GREENFIELD 
and JEFF DRUMMOND 

Jon Gitlin, a member 3 of Sigma 
Nu, applied to Bowdoin Early De- 
cision. He was influenced in his 
decision by an admissions officer 
at the college. Now that he is 
here he is generally satisfied. He 
finds the academics challenging 
and the social life adequate. 
When asked about the fraternity 
situation at Bowdoin he said, 
"For kids who find enjoyment in 
the aspects of fraternity life, 
whether it be downing a keg of 
beer or the "experience" to be 
gained by living with other peo- 
ple, fraternities are fine. I per- 
sonally detest some of the maso- 
chistic perversion I have observed 
at a few of the fraternities." Mr. 
Gitlin seems to be especially irked 
by the cal requirement. He ob- 
served that, "It was once said by 
the Greeks that a sound body was 
necessary for a sound mind. The 
Greek hegemony collapsed a few 
thousand years ago, and hopefully 
that idea died with it I came to 
the college to be educated in what 
interests me, not to be coerced 
into the appropriate physical con- 
tortions.'' 

Chuck Jones was impressed by 



Bowdoin's academic reputation 
but came here because he was not 
accepted at Amherst. He liked 
the fact that it was in New Eng- 
land. Chuck is not satisfied at all 
with the extra-academic life at 
Bowdoin. As a matter of fact, he's 
seriously considering transferring 
out. He feels that "a constructive 
weekend is impossible. The school 
refuses to enhance the social life 
of the independents. There is an 
unhealthy attitude toward the op- 
posite sex due to the unnatural 
environment here. Guys lose the 
proper respect for girls and de- 
velop unhealthy relationships. 
This college doesn't mature you. 
Fraternities exaggerate the prob- 
lem. The unnatural atmosphere 
drives one to drink. Chuck also 
criticized the lack of culture on 
campus (ie. more concerts and 
plays). 

Larry Sheppard, also an inde- 
pendent, came to Bowdoin from 
Florida. His. main reason for 
coming was to be near his girl 
friend. He applied Early Decision. 
Mr. Sheppard is satisfied with 
every aspect of Bowdoin life. He 
finds the academic atmosphere 
more than adequate and, of 
course, he has no complaints as 



far as "extra-academic" activity 
is concerned. He considers frater- 
nities "good for some people." He 
stated however that, "They are 
not worth the money charged 
when the charges are compared 
with the advantages." Larry 
found the swim test useful and is 
glad he has the opportunity to 
learn how to swim. 

Barry Browning, a member of 
AD, also applied early decision to 
the college. He is satisfied aca- 
demically but he finds many faults 
with the general atmosphere of 
the college. He stated, "Bowdoin 
desperately needs women on cam- 
pus. There is an unnatural atti- 
tude towards women prevalent on 
campus. Some Bowdoin men don't 
know how to treat them. They are 
more interested in accomplishing 
the quick make rather than treat- 
ing women as individuals. A girl 
here is an object rather than a 
person." Mr. Browning observes 
that, "Fraternities are very con- 
servative. They refuse to adapt to 
a changing student attitude and 
as result they probably won't sur- 
vive." 

Pete Avery dropped at TD but 
then dropped out. He finds that, 
(Please torn to page 5) 



PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1970 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Volume XCIX 



Friday, January 16, 1970 



Number 11 



Black Center Opens 



(Continued from page 1) 

uine human understanding in our- 
selves." Wiley also said a few 
words on the Center's purpose, 
and agreed with Howell that as a 
focal point for education of the 
blacks, the house could help focus 
the deepening of humanism in 
both black and white students. 

At 10:30 the activities moved 
to the Senior Center for speeches 
by three students and Howell. 
Paul Wiley, as coordinator for 
the day, introduced each speaker. 
Bob Johnson spoke first on the 
role of the Afro-Am Society at 
Bowdoin and beyond. 

He prefaced his talk with sev- 
eral remarks about Mr. Arna 
Bontemps, the speaker for that 
afternoon. Johnson then dis- 
cussed the two specific proposals 
which he felt were necessary for 
this country to survive. First, 
he believes it necessary to edu- 
cate the whites of this country, in 
order that they may learn human- 
ity; and it is necessary to edu- 
cate the blacks so that they may 
practice humanity. Secondly, 
Johnson would like to set up a 
black internship program for 
promising ghetto children. His 
idea is to spot junior high school 
kids with potential, and to ensure 
that they learn to find meaning in 
their friendships and in their 
lives. Before blacks can have 
any kind of meaningful relation- 
ship with whites, they will have 
to learn to get rid of their ha- 
treds, love each other, and really 
be brothers; only then will they 
be able to deal with the white so- 
ciety as a society of people, and 
not of oppressors. 

Richard Adams spoke next on 
the significance of January 15th. 
In a short essay, or "message to 
America," Adams discussed the 
purpose of observing Martin Lu- 
ther King Day. His speech was 
centered on the question King an- 
swered : it is no longer a ques- 
tion of violence or non-violence. 
The choice now is between non- 
violence and non-existence. 
Adams' stated his point very 
clearly: "America — change it or 
lose it." 

Eldridge Butler's topic was 
"Martin Luther King, Jr." He 
gave a very impressionistic pic- 
ture, full of complimentary ideas; 
many of the ideas and thoughts 
he presented as Dr. King's are ex- 
cellent generalizations. The ques- 
tion is: were they accurate, and 
did they present the whole pic- 
ture of Dr. King's ideals? One 
student said, "Sure, they were 
great as far as generalities go. 
But we never heard any of his 
concrete, specific ideas or actions, 
and they are also part of the 
man," 

Butler spoke of King as a man 
whose crime was honesty, and a 
failure to abide by hypocrisy and 
slaveocracy; "a runaway whose 
crime was brilliance;" a man 
a few compensations for failure 



and made people think it was 
progress ;" a modern Patrick Hen- 
ry (Give me liberty or give me 
death!). 

Without question, Butler's 
speech was the most entertaining 
and controversial of the day. It 
was consequently the most inter- 
esting and the best-received. 

President Howell then spoke on 
"Bowdoin and the Black Stu- 
dent." After discussing the prog- 
ress Bowdoin has made, he went 
on to say that "we are not here 
to celebrate victory, but to re- 
dedicate ourselves to the fight." 
The Center helps, he said, in two 
ways. First, it will give the 
black students a sense of com- 
munity and help them in their 
search for themselves*; secondly, 
it will serve as a center for the 
open exchange of Ideas between 
blacks and whites. 

Howell stated Bowdoin's com- 
mitment to blacks in three fields. 
Recruitment is one way the Col- 
lege can make a significant con- 
tribution to the black community. 
In the curriculum the college can 
assist the blacks in their search 
for identity. Finally, the college 
can make every possible effort to 
improve the social situation on 
campus for the black students. 

That afternoon three work- 
shops met to discuss non-vio- 
lence. The suggested topics for 
the groups were non-violence: a 
technique or a philosophy? non- 
violence: spirituality vs. practi- 
cality; none-v^olence in the '70's; 
and what is non-violence? In two 
of the workshops there seemed 
«*o be great tension, mostly due 
to the fact that without excep- 
tion the blacks sat on one side of 
the room and the white on the 
other. The other major prob- 
lem was that in the same two 
conferences, most of the black 
students were freshmen, who just 
do not know enough about Bow- 
doin now to make large general- 
izations. In the third workshop, 
the people were the best in the 
college (Rensenbrink, Butler, 
Johnson, Greason), and the ac- 
tual integration of the group 
gave it less of a divided feeling. 

Arna Bontemps spoke at three 
o'clock: HOLD FAST TO 
DREAMS was his subject. The 
great thing about Bontemps, as 
cne faculty member said, was 
that he was such a dynamic man 
in such troubled times, and he 
was so serene, so calm, that he 
was a completely different experi- 
ence. Bontemps, a poet of the 
famed Harlem Renaissance of the 
Depression and War Years, spoke 
as a poet; using poetry's images 
and figures of speech, he dis- 
cussed King's speeches and their 
sources: about the dreams of 
black children in the ghetto; 
about this age of miracles where 
any dream could come true. And 
th's is the final question of the 
day: Will the dream of Martin 
Luther King in fact come true? 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 
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adrertiaing by the National Educational Advertising; Service. Inc. Second class postage 
paid at Bmnswiek. Me. 04011. The subscription rats is Ave (f) dollars for on 



LETTERS TO 
THE EDITOR 



own ideals, careers, plans, programs, developments, 
and trade — in universal prosperity and PEACE. 
3-. Help to perfect, organize, and operate Au- 
tonomous (self-governing) Branches of THE UNI- 
VERSAL EXCHANGE — in ALL Communities 
of ALL Nations. 



YAF Speaks 



Help Wanted 



Dear Mr. Editor: 
Please publish the following appeal for help, and 

the enclosed starting point suggestions. 

Thank You, 
Jay Creswell, Senior 

HELP WANTED FROM STUDENTS OF ALL 
NATIONS 

The world's problems, and the solutions to those 
problems, that are already known to mankind — 
are so very great — that they require the very 
best study; thinking, and work of ALL. 

Please help, in these specific ways: 

1. Help to perfect, and to negotiate with ALL 
People of ALL Nations 

—THE UNIVERSAL EXCHANGE — 
GENERAL LIVING AGREEMENT, 
TRADE AGREEMENT, CONTRACT, FI- 
NANCING AGREEMENT, and, PEACE 
TREATY. 

2. Help to create, operate, and manage — THE 
UNIVERSAL EXCHANGE Corporation, as a co- 
operative, private, profit-making, taxpaying, fi- 
nancial institution (owned by ALL the People of 
the universe) — to provide abundant financing for 
ALL Students, ALL Schools, ALL People, ALL 
Communities, and ALL Governments — for their 



To The Editor; 

The Young Americans for Freedom of Bowdoin 
College would like to congratulate the members of 
the Afro-American Society on the opening of their 
Center. 

We would also like to commend them for the ex- 
cellence of the program planned for Martin Luther 
King Day. By showing themselves to be a con- 
structive force on campus, the Afro-Ams are doing 
justice to his memory. 

Congratulations again, 
Bowdoin Y.A.F. 



Misplaced Concreteness 

Editor, 

Your condemnation of the proposed student- 
taught course, Government 22, as a failure to ad- 
dress the issue squarely of whether or not the edu- 
cational structure at Bowdoin is failing would have 
carried much more weight if you had stated specif- 
ically where the structure should be examined for 
possible failure. If you are not willing to be spe- 
cific in stating your proposal for examination of 
the structure, then in the meantime you should 
leave concrete proposals for innovation like Gov 
22 alone. I would like to see you state why you 
feel more basic changes are necessary than inno- 
vations v like Gov 22. 

Robert Porteous 73 



Krosnick Thrills Students 
With Talk And Wisdom 



By PETE WILSON 

There is much in the way of 
praise for cellist Joel Krosnick, 
last weekend's visiting artist in 
this year's concert series. Antici- 
pating next year's concert format 
changes, the music department 
invited Mr. Krosnick to reside on 
campus for more than the usual 
one-night stand. And that he 
amiably did. During his three 
day stay, the young and talented 
cellist gave two formal evening 
concerts, read student composi- 
tions, played informally in the 
Moulton Union, and was even 
heard performing the David- 
cwsky electronic masterpiece in 
Professor Ireland's Math course. 
His desire to communicate the 
unique and mellow language 
of his instrument was enthusias- 
tic, even if the attendances were 
not up to full capacity. He is a 
remarkable artist. 

Those in attendance at Mr. 
Krcsnick's second Wentworth 
performance heard him at his 
best. The program was for un- 
companied cello and mixed well 
the old and the new. He present- 
ed two Bach suites, No. 3 "in Cv 
Major and No. 6 in D Major; the 
Schuller Fantasy for Solo Cello 
(1959); Davidowsky's Synchron- 
isms No. S for cello and electron- 
ic sounds (1964-1965); and Ko- 
daly's Sonata for Solo Cello. 
Bach's brilliant writing was truly 
respected by the fine technique, 
excellent tone, and warmth which 
came across in Krosnick's art. A 
clarity of line, technical mastery, 
and textural richness character- 



ized the cellist's understanding 
and reverence for the composer's 
genius. (The second Suite Mr. 
Krosnick performed was written 
originally for a five-string cello, 
known in Bach's day as the viola 
pomposa) The Kodaly piece, full 
of the Hungarian folk flavor and 
complete with all registers, is a 
fantastic presto and Was per- 
formed with virtuoso skill. Schul- 
ler's Fantasy and Davidowsky's 
Synchronisms brought home to 
the audience, or at least to this 
reviewer, the cellist's utmost 
dedication to the music of his 
time. In all the wild techniques 
and effects of the Schuller work. 
Mr. Krosnick communicated the 
despair and desolate tempera- 
ment of contemporary man's 
plight. It was a rarely moving 
experience. 

These few who heard this gift- 
ed man talk on Monday evening 
— after nearly thirteen hours of 
continuous playing all around 
campus — will hold in their 
memory an experience even more 
gratifying than his formal per- 
formance. His observations on 
total absorption with his art, 
with its beauty, with its ability 
to move him and to touch others 
were a valid lesson in the intangi- 
bilities of music. Mr. Krosnick's 
success at Bowdoin offers prom- 
ise for future week long artist 
residencies and involvement with 
the college community. His was 
a significant contribution to this 
year's musical calendar and simp- 
ly a great experience for those 
who came in contact with his art. 



YAF Urges 
Victory Now 

Spokesmen for Young Amer- 
icans for Freedom, the nation's 
largest conservative youth or- 
ganization, have announced from 
Washington that they have ini- 
tiated a nationwide campaign to 
mobilize nationwide support for 
President Nixon's determination 
to effectively combat communist 
aggression. 

1 ' National Vice-Cfiairman, Mi- 
chael Thompson, a graduate stu-. 
d«nt at the University of Missou- 
ri, said, "We support the Presi- 
dent's attempt to disengage 
American ground troops in Viet- 
nam. However, we believe that 
if the Vietnamese are to shoulder 
the major burden of the fighting, 
the United States should lift all 
military restrictions and allow 
the South Vietnamese to pursue 
a policy of victory when neces- 
sary." 

"This may be the only way to 
bring about an honorable peace," 
said Thompson. "We would urge 
the President to set a deadline 
for meaningful negotiations by 
Hanoi. Beyond that deadline, the 
South Vietnamese should be al- 
lowed to use air and naval pow- 
er effectively to win the war." 

To continue to permit young 
men to die in a war being: fought 
with one hand behind their back 
and in a tactical situation in 
which complete military victory 
is an impossibility, must be re- 
garded as the highest form of 
immorality." 

YAF also announced a petition 
campaign to call upon Hanoi to 
renounce military victory in the 
South. The petitions will be de- 
livered to the North Vietnamese 
delegation in Paris. 



Editors Don H Buy Lottery 



By RICK FITCH 

WASHINGTON — (CPS) 
College newspaper editors aren't 
buying the draft lottery. 

Editorial reactions to the induc- 
tion-by-birthdate system initiated 
by the Nixon administration have 
ranged from half-hearted accept- 
ance to anger at the government 
for making false promises, to out- 
right condemnation of the draft 
in any form. 

Small college papers have been 
especially vehement in their 
denunciations. The Knox College 
Student saw the lottery merely as 



a deceptive packaging of the old 
draft, and as another example of - 
the influence of the "bloated" and 
"corrupt" military on American 
life. 

"It is frightening. . .to see the 
sickening contradictions between 
the ideals cf free men and reality 
of the Selective Service System," 
the Student wrote. "We are toid 
that we must give up for a part 
of our lives our God given free- 
dom, our individuality, our birth- 
right as Americans. 

At one large state university, 
UCLA, the student paper voiced 



concern that the lottery will frag- 
ment opposition to the draft in 
general, and the war in Vietnam. 

The University of Maryland 
Diamondback attacked the lottery 
for not lessening the uncertainty 
faced by draft-age males. Point- 
ing out that the eccentricities of 
local boards make it nearly im- 
possible for a registrant to know 
when or if he will be inducted, the 
Diamondback said the Nixon ad- 
ministrations effort to clarify the 
draft for young people "has 
failed miserably." 

(Second in a series on the draft 
lottery's effects.) 



FRIDAY. JANUARY 16. 1970 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE FIVE 



Freshmen Look At Bowdoin~Peacefj)rips Pinched 



(Continued from page 3) 

"Fraternities consist of similarly 
oriented people even though the 
rush is at the very beginning of 
the year. Fraternities really serve 
no constructive purpose." Now 
that he is an independent he finds 
the life outside the classroom to 
be rather poor. He emphasized 
that the situation was the same 
even while he was fraternity 
member. Bowdoin was not Mr. 
Avery's first choice; however, he 
finds the academics here quite 
satisfactory. 

Jeff Gill, an independent finds 
himself at Bowdoin due to a 
strong recommendation by one of 
his secondary school teachers. He 
feels that, "students are not given 
enough time to fully delve into all 
of the subject matter. A great 
deal of subject matter in some of 
my courses is skipped over be- 
cause there isn't enough time." 
Mr. Gill stated that, "there is no 
need for fraternities on campus." 
He also expresses the opinion 
that, "coeducation would provide 
a more natural environment on 
campus." 

Many Freshmen came to Bow- 
doin this fall with certain expec- 
tations. In an attempt to define 
those expectations, and to de- 
termine the extent to which the 
College has fulfilled them, we in- 
terviewed several members of the 
Class of 1973. 

Judging from those freshmen 
interviewed, one can readily see 
that there is agreement in one 
general area. The freshmen feel 
that major improvements can be 
made in the extra-academic area. 
They find fault with fraternities 
as they now exist. They generally 
feel the lack of coeducation con- 
tributes to an artificial atmos- 
phere on campus which does not 
enhance one's education. The 



freshman interviewed recognize 
some of the problems at Bow- 
doin but feel that they can be 
solved. 

Bruce Lynch applied to Bow- 
doin because "it was the best 
small school I could think of;" Al 
Wright didn't want to fit into a 
pattern that was already estab- 
lished" at a large university. Bill 
Sexton wanted a small school 
where he could do a lot of study- 
ing and get to play soccer. All of 
the freshmen interviewed ex- 
pressed the same opinion Jim Ly- 
ons did: at a small college one 
can always get personal help 
from the faculty. BowdohVs size 
was one of the major reasons for 
which at least these freshmen ap- 
plied. • - 

Academically, as Sexton said, 
the Bowdoin workload is heavy. 
Few of the freshmen minded that: 
their complaints and praise were 
in other areas. All agreed that 
the professors were accessible to 
a degree unknown in larger uni- 
versities, and that courses on the 
whole are getting better. Al- 
though Dave Zimmerman felt that 
the course offerings were too li- 
mited, Bobby Porteous also 
pointed out that the new Urban 
Crisis course, despite its prob- 
lems, was a step in the right di- 
rection. However, most of the 
freshman year was felt to be bur- 
densome because of the require- 
ments. The speech and language 
requirements received almost 
universal -condemnation. 

Lynch also pointed out that be- 
cause of the small size of the 
school, the offerings and depart- 
ments were more limited. than at 
other schools. Zimmerman said 
that the curriculum was "a little 
bit traditional." 

Social life was the most con- 
troversial subject. Although Sex- 



ton said that a social life was 
open for anybody who wanted to 
work a little for it, Lyons and 
Zimmerman violently disagreed 
with him: "the weekends are 
okay If you can get away from 
Bowdoin," said Lyons; Wright 
added that a person is forced to 
completely re-organize his social 
life if he chooses not to join a 
fraternity. Nearly all agreed that 
the College should make some 
provision for the independents. 

Several of the freshmen criti- 
cized the student body for being 
"too apathetic" and "self-cen- 
tered." Wright wondered if this, 
was not the fault of the marking 
system which stresses withdrawal 
to the point of excluding inter- 
personal contact; Zimmerman 
thought that the fraternities in 
come cases encouraged this trait. 

Social reform, according to 
most of them, lies in college mix- 
ers inevitable, quick co-education, 
and the establishment of a stu- 
dent center with party rooms. 
Academic reform would mean, ac- 
cording to Wright, an absolute 
pass-fail system; Zimmerman is 
pressing for abolition of the two- 
semester year and the establish- 
ment of the four-one-four sys- 
tem; almost all agreed that the 
requirements have to be abol- 
ished; other than these gripes, the 
class of 1973 seems well satisfied 
with Bowdoin's scholarly stan- 
dards. As for the student body, 
most feel that one of the first 
things which must happen is that 
"independent must stop being a 
dirty word," and that some alter- 
native to fraternities, from party 
rooms to recreational facilities, 
must be supplied to the indepen- 
dents; it is also important that 
the student body lose its apathy 
and become involved in current 
issues. 



CEP Approves Government 22 



(Continued from page 2) 

complexity of data, and the bur- 
geoning knowledge that they can 
do this." 

"To be outside the curriculum 
is to be merely tangential to the 
processes of real learning, an 
hors d'ouvres or a dessert or 
maybe the cream on the pie that 
may at any moment turn sour 
through lack of concern. They 
ask for a place in the curriculum, 
a special place, a small place. 
They perceive that the curricu- 
lum already has in it a variety 
of academic genres, and they ask 
that the curriculum incorporate 
this dimension." 

The eight students plans to be- 
gin with a two week general in- 
troduction, after which they will 
break up for 4 weeks into rotat- 
ing groups of 3; they will then 
re-assemble for the final 4 weeks. 
The tentative description of the 
course is: 

Government 22 Political Modern- 
ization and Cultural Change: 



Selected Themes from Coun- 
tries of the Third World 

The course will deal broadly 
with political and related cul- 
tural trends among Third 
World peoples. It will treat in 
a fairly intensive and inter-re- 
lated way selected aspects of 
some of the major forces that 
are present in the underdevel- 
oped situation: the role and 
status of tradition and tradi- 
tional culture; the role of 
elites and the quest for iden- 
tity; the political organiza- 
tional and technical problems 
of development, especially ru- 
ral development; the nature 
of the continuing Western 
economic and political impact; 
racial and neo-colonial ex- 
ploitation; and third world 
nationalisms and ideologies. 
During the spring of 1970, the 
course will be oriented to the 
African continent, primarily 
black Africa south of the Sa- 
hara. 



The course will be taught as 
a multi-faceted seminar in 
which the students will at 
some points do individual in- 
dependents study, at o ther 
times will work in small 
groups of three or four with a 
student instructor, and at still 
other times, especially during 
the early and late phases of. 
the course, will meet all to- 
gether for lectures, discus- 
sions and reports. Thorough 
evaluation of the course, of 
the class and of the instruc- 
tors will take place during the 
final week. 

Pre-requisites: Government 
21, or History 34, or the con- 
sent of the instructors. 
During the spring of 1970 the 
course will be taught by 
Messrs. Bucci, Curtis, . Fend- 
ler, Fudge, Hastings, Macln- 
tyre, Mills, and Parsons under 
the general academic supervi- 
sion of Messrs. Lewis and 
Rensenbrink. 



College Boards Eliminated 



(Continued from page 1) 

you will be able to retain the same high standards 
you are known for and you will have even more 
outstanding applicants than before. 
From Wheat Ridge, Colorado: 
I am so impressed with your mailing on the sub- 
ject of testing for college entrance that I feel I 
must take the time out to tell you so. The educa- 
ional process obviously must change, but this is 
sometimes difficult for high schools when colleges 
remain static. 
From Fort Worth, Texas: 

I for one want to express my total great delight. 
One supposes that there is hope after all. Hear! 
Hear! 

But not all the replies were from secondary 
schools. Mr. Moll received responses from several 
colleges and universities. Haverford College Di- 
rector of Admissions stated rather cautiously: 
I thought that your folder about not requiring 
test scores was very well done. It's given us 
something to think about here. Ill be interested 
to hear how you feel about it next fall. 
The head of admissions at Northwestern Univer- 



sity was more enthusiastic but pointed out the 
possibility of additional change. 

I applaud your new policy. I am now curious as to 
the position Bowdoin is taking regarding grades 
verses pass fail options at the high school and col- 
lege level. Certainly the most enthusiastic (and 
earthy) reply came from the Director of Admis- 
sions at Reed College in Portland, Oregon. Iron- 
ically Reed's SAT averages are in the 700's. 

Your guys have guts and style: the statement 
about your faculty's decision to eliminate the test 
score requirement is superb, and I dare say you 
will find others following your lead before long. I 
wish we could follow the first shot of the revolu- 
tion from Maine with a second from the Pacific 
Northwest-but I am afraid that our faculty is suf- 
fering from such an accute case of constipation 
right now that such a move is unlikely. Approval 
of the new admission policy and the hope for more 
extensive changes in education seem to be wide- 
spread among directors of admission and guidance 
councilors. If changes aren't effected in the near 
future, the fault certainly won't lie with this group 
of men and women. 



By RICK FITCH 
College Press Service 

WASHINGTON — (CPS) — Vietnam, Chicago, and People's Park 
are taking their toll on the Peace Corps. 

In so far as they are issues representing alienation from society, mis- 
trust of government governmental authority, and heightened political 
consciousness among the young, they have thrust the Peace Corps, 
which professes to remain apolitical in a political world, into a crisis of 
identity. 

Faced with a steadily decreasing number of applicants- and requests 
from foreign nations for volunteers, new director Joseph Blatchford, 
with President Nixon's blessings, has taken steps toward "technologiz- 
ing" the corps by removing some of the manpower burden from po- 
tentially volatile liberal arts graduates or "generalists," and placing, 
it on skilled — and older — specialists. 

Whereas in the first eight years of the corps' existence, an average 
of 85-90 per cent of the volunteers have been generalists, the new goal 
is to reduce that number to 70 percent in 1970 and provide the general- - 
ists with more extensive technological training. The other 30 per cent 
are to consist primarily of technicians such as statisticians and com- 
puter experts recruited from industries which hopefully will grant 
them special leaves to serve as volunteers. 

When Congress approved establishment of the Peace Corps in 1961 
as a part of President Kennedy's New Frontier program and declared 
the corps' purpose to "promote world peace and friendship," its direct- 
tor, R. Sargent Shriver, predicted the first year's involvement of 578 
volunteers would spiral to 17,500 by mid-1968. 

His prediction was not realized. The total number of applications, of 
which approximately 90 per cent were from the ranks of recent college 
graduates, decreased from a peak of 45,000 in 1964 to 31,000 in 1968. 
Today, after some 30,000 volunteers have participated and returned to 
the U.S., the number of volunteers during 1969 stands at 11,000. At 
this time in 1967 there were 15,000 volunteers. 

Most observers credit the decline generally to the social turmoil 
engulfing the country and particularly to young people's disaffection 
with the federal government, its militarism abroad and oppression of 
poor and minority groups at home. 

Many idealistic youths who otherwise might have channeled their 
activist energies into the Peace Corps have not because they are un- 
able to reconcile the contradictory hypocrisy of the U.S. government 
maintaining half a million people in one country, Vietnam, toHvag? - "^ 
war, while at the same time maintaining about one fiftieth that num- 
ber in 50-60 countries for the professed cause of peace._. 

"The great wave of middle class idealism on the part of young 
Americans which has sustained the Peace Corps since 1962 is ebbing, 
for the American student middle class . . . has lost its self-confidence," . 
opined one volunteer, who cited Vietnam as the main reason. 
, There have been three well-known incidents related to Vietnam 
dissent in the Peace Corps and, all three have underscored the corps' 
basic allegiance to the administration in power, disproving the notion 
that the organization is independent from the aims and purposes of 
U.S. foreign policy. 

When in 1965 a volunteer submitted an article critical of U.S. in- 
volvement in Vietnam to the corps' official publication, the Volunteer, 
Shriver ruled it could not be printed because that would constitute 
"exploitation" of the author's official connection with the U.S. govern- 
ment. 

When then vice president Hubert Humphrey visited Liberia, a group 
of volunteers decided to confront him with their anti-war views. Learn- 
ing of the plan, the top Peace Corps official in Liberia said the volun- 
teers would be dismissed if they went ahead with it. 

In 1967, when volunteers in Santiago, Chile circulated a petition ask- 
ing for "peace now" in Vietnam, they were warned by the national of- 
fice to retract it or disassociate themselves as volunteers from it^Dne 
volunteer, Bruce Murray, protested the decision in a letter to Jack 
Vaughn, then director, and the letter was publicized in the Chile press. 
Murray was subsequently dismissed by Vaughn on the grounds that 
publication of the letter represented a violation of corps' regulations, 
since he had involved himself in a "local political issue." Eventually, 
Vaughn changed the regulations to permit a volunteer to identify him- 
self as such in a letter to the news media, but the bad publicity from 
this and the other incidents lingered in students' minds. 

A Louis Harris Poll taken in late 1968 revealed that 20 per cent of 
college seniors were fearful of losing their right to free speech in join- 
ing the corps. 

Another sore point has been Peace Corps' recruitment of people 
from minority groups. Many suspect — and they are correct — that 
the corps has largely been the domains of better-off white youths who 
gain entrance by virtue of having gone to college. Since Blacks, Mexi- 
can-Americans and Indians are unable to afford college, there is built- 
in class and race discrimination in the corps. 

Blatchford admitted in a recent press conference that the corps is 
"almost lily-white." Partially as a result, interest in the organization 
is low among Blacks. A Harris poll taken in 1968 showed that only 
nine per cent of graduating Blacks were seriously considering join- 
ing. Thirty-nine per cent voiced the opinion that the corps exists to 
improve America's image overseas rather than help developing coun- 
tries. 

Highly critical of the Peace Corps are members of the Committee of 
Returned Volunteers (CRV), which recently picketed the White House 
while Peace Corps country directors were breakfasting with President 
Nixon inside. They carried signs advocating abolition of the Peace 
Corps and chanted, 'Ho, Ho, Ho Chi Minh — we're going to do the 
Peace Corps in." 

As Blatchford met in Maryland with top officials to chart new direc- 
tions for the corps, CRV held an assembly in Minneapolis. The 1200- 
member organization issued a position paper stating it is "convinced 
that real development is often impossible without a revolution that 
carries out an equitable redistribution of economic and political pow- 
er, including nationalization of all resources; one which makes educa- 
tion, employment, housing and medical care available to all the people. 
' "The United States opposes any such revolution and the Peace Corps 
is an integral part of U.S. policy. There may well be many superficial 
changes in the Peace Corps structure from time to time, but regardless 
of these changes, it will continue to function as an instrument of U.S. 
domination. - 

"Therefore we" oppose the presence of the Peace Corps volunteers in 
the Third World. We call for abolition of the United Spates Peace 
Corps. We call upon present volunteers to subvert the Peace Corps and 
all other institutions of U.S. imperialism." 

But what is really crippling the Peace Corps — on the campuses and 
in the world — is its association with the U.S. government. And that's 
an incurable malady. No government support, no Peace Corps. 



PAGE SIX 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1970 



"WHAT EMERGES from Songmy- 
just as in the liberal Left's response 
to the murders by Oswald, Sirhan 
and Ray— is an uncontrollable im- I 
pulse not to blame the particular 
criminal, but rather to vilify Amer- 
ica generally. The assassinations 
permitted the expression of a deep 
animosity against America, gave 
such feeling a seeming legitimacy. 
As an opportunity to indulge in this 
dark process,^ ^ a fr## ^ ^ 

NATIONAL RE- 
VIEW, writ.: D*pt. 
Y. 190 E. 35 Str..t, 
N. Y. 10016. 



Songmy was\ 
seised uponml-\ 
moat gleefully" 



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(Continued from page 3) 
"The university can only do 
what it does well," he said — 
"study the problems, make recom- 
mendations,, and train the experts 
who can then go out to work on 
them." 

Radical ► students, he empha- 
sized, don't have any program — 
"they are profound in protest, but 
paralyzed in performance" — and 
many of their demands are trivial. 




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They don'tr attack things like 
trade unions, which are the most 
discriminatory things around," he 
said. "They attack the university, 
which is innocent and vulnerable." 

Yet they don't seem to know 
their own strength, he indicated, 
citing the student movement be- 
hind the Sen. Eugene McCarthy 
presidential campaign. "Look 
what students in politics accom- 
plished," he said. "They toppled 
a President, changed the course 
of the war in Vietnam and, but 
for a fate, might have elected a 
presidents What could they have 
done if they had elected to stay 
together?" 

Prof. Commager, a prolific au- 
thor and commentator, capsuled 
his views on a wide range of con- 
troversial topics: 

ROTC — "It should never have 
been permitted on campus in the 



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1 * 
i . 

If you want assistance in obtaining summer 
employment, see Mr. AAoulton in the 

Student Aid Office. 

This year the Student Aid Office will attempt to help 
students secure summer jobs through Bowdoin alumni. 
If you are interested, sign up in the Student Aid Office so 
your name will be available to alumni on a referral basis. 



first ptaoc. Students didn't dis- 
cover this; it was known 30 years 
«.«">. Giving academic credit for 
ROTC is like **iving credit for 
football. If you drive it off cam- 
pus, the Army will still produce 
" , ffi>ers anyway." 

BLACK STUDIES — "They 
might be some use for white ther- 
apy, but they are little use to 
blacks. Whatever makes for more 
alienation makes things worse. 
Black studies are not consistent 
with the academic enterprise, 
especially if programs and faculty 
are chosen for color rather than 
competence." 

RELEVANCE — 'This is a 
word used by students when they 
are disappointed because the uni- 
versity has not inspired or guided 
them and because they don't think 
it 'relevant' to their concerns. 
This is not the university's busi- 
ness either. It is not a therapeutic 
institution. Relevance is a subjec- 
tive and individualized response 
which changes every day for 
everybody, in different ways." 

CURRICULUM — "Students 
suffer from a 'tyranny of courses' 
which Is a legacy handed down 
from the days when students ac- 
tually were children. Today they 
should be treated as adults, be- 
cause there are too many rules 
and too many courses. There are 
a lot of ways to learn without 
'taking courses.' Yet you can't 
juggle the curriculum to fit every 
current whim or interest." 



Stowe Travel 
Agency 

Tel: 725-5574 

"BOWDOIN-BERMUDA 

WEEK 

, in the spring. . . .-" 

See or call Mr. Hagan 

at Stowe Travel 

9 Pleasant St. 

Brunswick, Maine 





Student 

air fares 

to Europe 

start at 

*120 

starting 
now 

Icelandic has the greatest 
travel bargain ever for stu- 
dents ... our brand new 
$120* one-way fare to 
Luxembourg in the heart of 
Europe. If you're travelling 
to or from your studies at a 
fully accredited college or 
university, and are 31 years 
old or under, you qualify for 
this outstanding Tate. It's 
* an individual fare, not a 
charter or group; you fly 
whenever you want, and 
can stay up to a year. Inter- 
ested? Qualified? Call your 
travel agent or write for 
Student Fare Folder CN. 
Icelandic Airlines, 630 Fifth 
Ave: (Rockefeller Center) 
New York, N.Y. 10020. 

•Slightly higher In peak 
season. 

ICELANDIC J,^ 

STILL 
LOWEST 



TO EUROPE 

ef any scheduftd airline. 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1970 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 



Friday Review: Let Me Be Brief... 



Cub Pucksters and 
Boston State College 

By JOHN MEDEIROS 
for the Orient 

In its last outing before Christmas vacation, the 

Bowdoin Freshman hockey team took a 4-3 victory 

from the hands of Boston State College. The game 

f^ was held before a small crowd on December 16 in 

the Arena. 

The Polar Bears got off to a slow start, and ap- 
peared to be in trouble when Boston's Cotter drove 
in past goalie Tom Hutchinson for the flrst period's 
only goal, seven minutes and fifteen seconds into 
the game. For most of the period Boston controlled 
the puck, and the Boston team managed to make 
only four shots on the goal. 

The second period saw the situation reversed, 
however, as the Bowdoin first line drove through 
again and again for the goal. The first Bowdoin 
point came only 52 seconds into the period, as Pete 
Flynn drove in unassisted. A scant minute and 53 
seconds later, Dick Donovan scored on assists from 
Flynn and Bernie Quinlan. 

The two teams battled for control of the puck, 
but the Donovan-Flynn-Quinlan team did it again 
at 5:52, as Quinlan's fast footwork put Bowdoin 
ahead by 3 to 1. 

Boston State again took control, and Cotter shot 
past Hutchinson for Boston's second point at 9 :33 
into the period. The Bowdoin Icemen, not to be out- 
done, came back with a goal by Quinlan from Dono- 
van and Flynn to put Bowdoin firmly on top. 

Despite a valiant rally during the final period, 
Boston just could not get past a determined Bow- 
doin defense led by John Taussig, Skip Clarke, and 
Joe Tufts . . . except for one slip just 17 seconds 
away from the end of the game, when Boston's 
Leahy slipped past everybody to score an unassisted 
goal. 



Christmas Bells For 
Varsity Hoop Squad 

By BILL FINK 
Orient Sports Writer 

The third game of Bowdoin's varsity basketball 
season at Wesleyan in Middletown, Connecticut 
proved to be another link in the ever increasing 
chain of Bear loses. Although the visiting hoopers 
held a five point half time lead, a strong surge by 
the Cardinals in the final quarter cut short the hope 
of a first victory for Bowdoin. The final score was 
a discouraging 75-62. However, Captain Chip Mill- 
er managed to tally twenty-one points and snag 
twenty rebounds in the vain Bear effort. 

The final game for the varsity basketball squad 
before the Christmas vacation was against M. I. T. 
on the Morrell floor. After suffering four successive 
loses at the hands of their first four opponents, the 
Bears finally made a combined effort and soundly 
downed the Engineers by a lopsided 88 to 69 score, 
in a fine all out effort. 

Tournament play at Central Connecticut College, 
saw Bowdoin pitted against heavily favored Hart- 
ford in the first day's action. The Bears built an 18 
point lead only to succumb to Hartford's heavy 
"press" during the final ten minutes of the contest. 
The finishing touch was made by Hartford's fine 
center, Wayne Augustine, when he sunk a jump 
shot just before the final buzzer to give Hartford 
the game, 77 to 75. 

Saturday, in the consolation game, Bowdoin came 
face to face with its earlier superior, Wesleyan. The 
final score showed an overwhelming second half 
Wesleyan rout, 87-63. Although Steve Carey had 23 
points, only six of these came in the second half. 
Carey was elected to the All-Tournament Team — 
the only Bear representative, and later to the East- 
ern Collegiate Athletic Conference Team of the 
Week. 




Cubs Ha ve High ' 'Hoops ' '; 
Toliver And Co. Underway 

Ken Toliver turned in another great effort to lead the Bowdoin Frosh to their fifth straight 
win against the Colby freshmen, 72-61. Toliver's 28 points helped boost the Cubs to the half- 
way mark of this year's campaign which is one of the best ever. 

At the outset, it looked like an easy win for the Bears, but Colby came roaring back with Steve 

Jasinski and took a 33-32 half- 

And on other campuses . . . 




SEXUAL REVOLUTION ... or, "WHY DONT WE DO IT IN THE 

ROAD?" Two bee, or three bees — that is the question posed in the 
above candid action photo on a nearby college campus where a group 
of bnmbulous-aereous was found demonstrating for free and open sex- 
ual relations. One thing is clear from the rather obscured photo— they 
aren't gathering honey. 

In closer proximity to the Bowdoin campus, "Bob, Ted, Carol and 
Alice" offer a somewhat less graphic human sexual response to such 
activities. Don't waste your money. 




Fresh Coffee and 
Spudnuts 

Makes 

"ANYTIME SPUDNUT 

TIME" 

212 Maine Street 
Brunswick, Maine 



time advantage. Jasinski later fin- 
ished the game with a fine losing 
cause effort of 27 points. 

In the second half it was a dif- 
ferent story as Bowdoirroutscored 
the opposition 40-28 and coasted 
to a victory. 

The next stop is Gorham State 
on February 18th where they hope 
to add a sixth victim to their list. 

After holding back a surpris- 
ing third quarter scoring spree, 
the cubs went on to whip a sharp 
shooting Andover Academy five 
88-76 for their fourth straight 
win of the season last weekend. 

After the opening tap, An- 
dover threw in eight points for 
an early 8-0 lead, but when the 
frosh got underway, they pushed 
ahead to a 20-19 first quarter 
lead which stood for the rest of 
the game. 

In the second half, except for 
a short time in the third period, 
Bowdoin ran over and around the 
opposition with Lee Arris and 
Ken Toliver doing most of the 
damage. They finished with 30 
and 27 points respectively. 

The frosh basketball squad 
capLured their third victory in 
four starts. As they dropped the 
M. I. T. Engineers in a seesaw 
contest, 81 to 75. Lee Arris and 
Frank Campignone, both cub 
guards, were cited for their out- 
standing efforts in keeping the 
Bowdoin attack alive far the en- 
tire game. Also turning in an 
outstanding offensive and defen- 
sive effort was center, Kevin 
Douglas. Bowdoin's last fourth 
quarter shooting seemed to pick 
up as the pressure of the evenly 
matched contest became greater. 
This coupled with a few timely 
rebounds helped the Bears to a 
well earned victory. 



DUDE! 




WHERE THE ACTION IS .... as usual, is in front of the opposition's 
goal as Ed Dowd and Rob Petrta keep live University of Connecticut 
defenders busy blocking a shot on goal. 

Cub Swimmers Split Meets 
With MIT and Portland 

The freshman swimming team traveled to New Hampshire after the 
Christmas Holiday layoff. After losing the first relay, the Cubs found 
themselves behind early in the meet. This loss increased until after the 
diving competition when, down by 12, the squad made a strong second 
half comeback. Tom Costin lead the charge with a record breaking 
2:18.7 in the 200 yard Backstroke, were beaten for the second time in 



John Erikson took first in the 500 
yard Freestyle and was followed 
closely by teammate Ralph Crow- 
ley, who was swimming his first 
competitive 500. When John Ward 
and Ian Pitstick swept the Breast- 
stroke event the Cubs managed to 
grab a slim lead. New Hampshire, 
however, took the final relay and, 
as a result, the entire meet. The 
final score was an extremely close 
46-48. 

With their first defeat only 
three days behind them, the Cub 
Aqua Squad met an extremely 
strong M. I. T. in Boston. Again, 
both relays proved fatal to the 
Bowdoin cause as the swimmers 



a close encounter. John Erikson 
captured two first places again as 
did Tom Costin by turning in a 
time of 2:22.5 in the 200 yard 
Backstroke. 

The day immediately following 
the M.I.T. loss, the team was in 
the water again. This time, it was 
to participate in Maine's first tri- 
angular meet. At the Portland 
"Y", the team bounced back to 
its normal winning status by 
scoring 77 points to overrule He- 
bron's 48 and Deering High's 41. 
The meet was never out of Bow- 
doin's control as Cub swimmers 
dominated most events. 



PARKVIEW CLEANERS 

212 MAINE STREET 

"On the Hill" 

WASH & DRY & 24 HOUR SHIRT SERVICE 
FREE ALTERATIONS 



PAGE EIGHT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. JANUARY 16. 1970 



■*-^ 



Icemen Tops in EC AC II; 
Down Colby, U Conn, Army 

By BRIAN DAVIS 
Orient Sports Writer 

v The University of Connecticut proved to be no match for the varsity Iceman in the arena last 
Saturday night as Bowdoin outscored, outskated, and outraged their second division competi- 
tors. The first period showed only one goal for the Bears, a shot made good by Co-Captain Steve 
Hardy. But the second and third 



periods made up for this defi- 
ciency. Scoring in the second peri- 
od was done by; Block, one goal 
at 3:52 into the period and Ray- 
mond, two goals at 5:25 and 8:59 
into the period. The second peri- 
od's rout was followed with third 
period action by; King, one goal 
at 17:07 and Good, one goal at 
17:14. However, these final two 
goals were apparently acts of re- 
taliation as U. Conn, also scored 
two quick successive goals earlier 
in the same period. 

The only demoralizing factor of 
the entire 6-2 victory was the in- 
jury to Bowdoin goalkeeper, John 
Bradley, early in the second peri- 
od. Until his removal from the 
game, Bradley, had saved ten 
shots on goal, bringing his season 
total to 134 saves out of 145 at- 
tempts. Bradley's knee kept him 
out of action during the Colby 
crush, but he is expected to be 
defending the nets against both 
Vermont and Williams. 

Other varsity hockey action 
this week took the Bears to Wa- 
terville where the preceded to 
destroy the Mules and their sea- 
sonal aspirations. After scoring 
twice in the first period, the Bears 
found Colby in hot pursuit of a 
victory, as the Mules tied the ef- 
forts of Good and Raymond at 
2-2. However, the Bear attack 
would not relent and in the clos- 
ing minutes of the first period 
both Hall and Maxwell scored. In 
the next two periods, Colby made 
a policy of taking the scoring ini- 
tiative, but in every success they 
found failure, as Bowdoin mim- 
icked their scores and added one 
without provocation. The final 
score was 8-5. Aside from Hall, 
Raymond and Good, who tallied 
twice, Bear scorers were; Max- 
well, Matthews, and Block, who 
also managed two goals. 

In action prior to and during 
the Holiday season, Bowdoin de- 
feated Army in the first home 
game of the season. In reaction to 
the throng of supporters in atten- 
dance, the Bears held Army score- 
less and coasted to an easy victory 
after three first period goals, al- 
though additional third period 
tally was well applauded. In the 
Second Annual Cleveland Cup 
Tournament, the Bears skated to 
a one and two record, beating 
McGill, 6-2 and losing to Western 
Ontario, 3-1 and Dartmouth, 2-1. 
This weekend's action pits the 
Bears against U. Vt and Wil- 
liams in home contests on Friday 
and Saturday. 



You ars Hying a reality 

i left yean ago ... 
It quite nearly killed me. 



Eastern Hockey Standings 



1. Cornell 

2. Boston Col. 
2. Harvard 

4. Boston U 

5. Providence 
«. Colgate 

7. Clarkaon 

8. UNH 



Division I 



(1.100) 

( .000) 

( .««7) 

< .««) 

< -««7) 
( MT) 

< .SOS) 
( .500) 



1. Bowdoin 

2. Merrimae 
S. Middlebury 

4. Hamilton 

5. Vermont 
(. Nichols 

7. Colby 

8. Holy Cross 



Division II 



(1.000) 



.821) 
.750) 
.750) 
.750) 
.750) 
.6*7) 
.(42) 




Leading Scorers 
(Div. II) 



Murphy (Holy Cross) 
Benson (Williams) 
Batt (Hamilton) 



Leading Goalies 
II) 



(Div 
Bradley (Bowdoin) 
Van Werf (Middlebury) 
Timmona (Colby) 



KINO SLAPS ONE ON U. CONN, as teammates wait to escort the 
puck to the goal. Connecticut allowed the Bears many such scoring op- 
portunities. Six of them were scoreboard material. 



Mermen at 34 



First Swim Victory Over MIT in Five 



By MARTIN FRIEDLANDER 
Orient Sports Editor 

It was a lot like the Amherst meet of last 
season. Bowdoin was facing a squad she 
hadn't beaten in several seasons and MIT 
looked tough. One of the Bear's most ver- 
satile and strongest sophomore swimmers 
was drydocked with mono and the three hour 
bus ride to Cambridge didn't help the team's 
spirits for the 8:30 p.m. meet. 

It all mattered not — the varsity swam 
their best meet of the season yet and de- 
feated a stunned Tech squad, 52-44. It was 
the Bears' third consecutive victory in four 
meets. With Williams traveling to Bruns- 
wick Saturday, the record is threatened, but 
certainly not doomed. 

The first relay was up for grabs, and both 
squads knew it. With each squad's strong- 
est event men pitted against their counter- 
parts, the Bears shaved seven seconds off 
their previous best time for as many points, 
the much sought initial victory, and a clock 
reading of 3:58.9. Ken Ryan eased off on 



the final length of his freestyle leg in anti- 
cipation of the 200 IM he was to swim two 
events later. 

The 200 Freestyle fell to MIT, but Jeff 
Meehan pulled an upset first place in the 50 
freestyle with a 23.6 Ken Ryan followed 
suit with another first place time in the 200 
Medlay with a 2:10.9. In the diving, a dis- 
appointing two-tenths of a point separated 
victory from previously undefeated sopho- 
more diver John Wendler. 

Picking up after the diving, the 200 butter- 
fly-saw Barry Stevens set out on a pace 
which sometimes overtook superflyer Bow 
Quinn. However, Stevens died to a 51.0 final 
50, but managed to so psyche out his oppon- 
ent that he was good for the second, follow- 
ing first place Quinn. In the 100 freestyle, 
Parker Barnes came back from his loss in 
the 200 for a victory. Bob Stuart's second 
place in the 200 Backstroke filled in between 
firsts in the free and fly. 

The 500 freestyle proved to be the surprise 
event of the day for MIT coach Charlie Bat- 



terman. After Bowdoin team captain John 
Spencer cut 20 seconds off his previous sea- 
son's best for a victory margin of 14 seconds, 
Batterman increduously asked Spencer if he 
was, in fact, Spencer. He was. 

The Bears secured the meet in the 200 
Breaststroke as Ken Ryan took his second 
first place of the evening with another best 
time for himself of 2:28.5. John McPhillips 
trailed with a third in the same event. MIT 
was unable to pull out the last relay, increas- 
ing the victory score to 52-44 for the Polar 
Bears. For the first time this season, Bow- 
doin Coach Charlie Butt had first hand ex- 
perience with the MIT pool water. 

The Bears host a perenially strong Wil- 
liams squad Saturday. The Ephs' strength lie 
in their junior freestylers and pose stiff com- 
petition for their Bowdoin counterparts. With 
John Spencer constantly shaving his times in 
the 500 and Jeff Meehan slicing his 50 time, 
the additional untapped strength may prove 
to be the margin necessary to earn the Bears 
their fourth consefcutive victory. 



Polar Bearings 



Hockey 



Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 



5-2 
vs. UVM Fri. 



Army ■ ■ 

Ontario 

McGill 

Dartmouth 

U Conn 

Colby 



vs. 
Bowdoin Fr. 
Bowdoin Fr. 
Bowdoin Fr. 
Bowdoin Fr. 



Willis 

4 
2 

2 
8 



7:20 



4-2 



Sst. 4:00 
Boston State 
Salem State 
Andover 
Colby 



M-rimmare Fraraingham Sat. 



Wrestling 



Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 



• 
17 
17 
1* 



0-2 



Amherst 
Main* 
Lowell 
UNH 



vs. Brandeis Sat 2:00 

Track 

Bowdoin 4C UNH 

0-4. 
at MIT Sat. 2 :00 



20 
28 
25 
22 



»r 





Basketball 




Bowdoin 


02 Wesleyan 


75 s 


Bowdoin 


87 MIT 


18 


Bowdoin 


75 Hartford 


77 


Bowdoin 


•2— Wesleyan 


87 


Bowdoin 


83 WP1 


64 


Bowdoin 


«8 Colby 
1-5 
Brandeis Fri. 4:00 


72 


at 




vs. 


Williams Sat. 4:00 




Bowdoin Fr. 


85 MCI 


82 


Bowdoin Fr. 


C< Exeter 


60 


Bowdoin Fr. 


75 MIT 


68 


Bowdoin Fr. 


88 Andover 


78 


Bowdoin Fr. 


72 Colby 


(1 


at Gorhara Sat. 0:30 






Swimming 




Bowdoin 


66 U Mass 


2C 


Bowdoin 


56 UNH 


39 


Bowdoin 


52 MIT 
3-1 


42 


vs. 


Williams Sst. 4 .00 




Bowdoin Fr. 


47 Huntington 


47 


Bowdoin Fr. 


46 UNH 


148 


Bowdoin Fr. 


40 MIT 

1-2-1 
Squash 


54 


Bowdoin 


2 Harvard "B" 


6 




0-1 





Mules Kick Bears 
After Tech Wreck 

By BILL FINK 
Orient Sports Writer 

This past week proved disasterous for the varsity basketball squad as 
they suffered two disheartening defeats. Worcester Polytech dealt an 
83-64 death blow on January 10, and more recently the Colby Mules 
downed the Bears, 73-68. 



Williams College, R.L 

... a retiring sports editor 



Weightlifters "Pressed"... 



Bar-belles Drop Weight On Lisbon 



Posing as the Brunswick Barbell Club, the Polar 
Bear ironmen staged a come-from-behind mild up- 
set over the State Champion Lisbon team on De- 
cember 14 by winning 96-93. Trailing by ten 
points going into the final event, the deadlift, the 
Bears swept the first two places with Captain 
Rick Spill winning and Doug MacKinnon getting a 
clutch second. This was the margin of victory 
necessary for the team. 

High scorer for the meet was Mike King of Lis- 
bon with 42 points, including first place in the 
press, snatch, and clean and jerk. His lifting set 
two Maine State Teenage 165 pound class records, 



a 235 pound press and a 205 pound snatch. Spill 
led the Bowdoin scoring with 31 points, winning 
the squat and the deadlift. MacKinnon added 22 
points. 

Bowdoin men set four Maine Stat e Power lifti ng 
records. Doug Sewall led^^the-way with an out- 
standing 215 pound bench press in the 123 pound 
class to break the old record by 75 pounds. Doug 
MacKinnon upped the 242 pound class bench press 
mark to 265. Roy Bouchard's 275 pound squat 
broke his own record in the 132 pound class, and 
Spill's 475 pound deadlift raised the 198 pound 
class standard by 40 pounds. 



The Worcester game, played on 
the victor's hardwood, saw a phe- 
nomenal demonstration of field 
goal accuracy and rebounding on 
i he part of the Worcester team as 
they connected on 63% of their 
two-point attempts while holding 
a decided board edge over the hap- 
less Bears. Though the Bowdoin 
men were only four points down 
at half time, 37-33, the second 
stanza proved to be their undo- 
ing as they were outpointed, 46- 
31. Worcester's attack was com- 
plemented by the fact that all five 
of their starters scored in double 
figures, led by Rooney with 19 and 
Cunningham with 18. Bowdoin's 
Clark Young took the game's scor- 
ing honors, however with 23 
markers, while Captain Chip Mill- 
er contributed 11 points. 

On Wednesday evening the 
Bears traveled to Waterville 
where they were defeated by 
Maine rival Colby College. Though 
Colby led throughout most of the 
contest, the stubborn Bears re- 
mained constantly within striking 
distance as they even held the 
lead for brief moments. Though 
both tea ms appeared to b e evenly 
matchecT it was a case where 
Bcwdnin miscues. in the form of 
dstly fouls and turnovers, pro- 
vided Colby's slim winning mar- 
gin. Vince Bagel of Colby was the 
"lame's leading scorer with 25 
points, with John Rhinehart con- 
tributing 15. Clark Young again 



led the Bears with 19 points while 
Miller pumped in 18 and John 
Outhuse 14. 

This weekend the Bears face 
Brandeis Friday evening and re- 
turn home Saturday afternoon to 
face Williams. 

Rebounding from their first 
tastes of victory, the Bear iron- 
gamers were not equal to the 
task of coping with a much deep- 
er and more experienced MIT 
team, losing 82-44 in a meet held 
last Saturday in the Sargent 
Gymnasium. 

The Engineers, '-led by Charlie 
Valverde, last year's third place 
winner in the Junior National 
148 pound class, garnered three 
of the four first places, and all 
four seconds. Valverde copped 
the honors in the snatch and 
cleaned and jerk while Ed Crow- 
'y, MIT's captain-coach, won the 
bench press with a lift of 340 
pounds! John Benson, Bowdoin's 
lone bright spot, won the squat, 
and combined with Captain Rick 
Spill, to score 38 of Bowdoin's 44 
points. 

MIT's barbell brood returned 
to Cambridge with a trophy sym- 
bolic of their afternoon's accorm 
plishments, while Benson, Val- 
verde. and Crowly each received 
awards for their individual ef- 
forts. Benson, who tied with Val- 
verde as the meet's high scorers 
at 25 point apiece, lost the MVP 
trophy on a coin flip. 



CORRECTED EDITION 



r 



-pr 



Bontemps Seeks Roots For King In Harlem Renaissance 



By PAUL BATISTA 

The Harlem Renaissance, beginning in 1917 and end- 
ing after a decade, produced poetry originally pub- 
lished in little magazines: standard . periodicals and 
firms did not accept what Arna Bontemps yesterday 
identified as "captivity literature." It was an effort to 
find a form or topic that would be published at all. For 
example, Frank Yerby wrote during the Depression a 
novel about black life; it was rejected, "and sometimes 
savagely criticized," by many publishers. The experi- 
ence was common. Yerby then produced a novel in 
which no blacks appeared, a sleight of hand so com- 
plete that the book sold over a million copies, as have 
all of Yerby's later ones. 

Bontemps sensed the same frustrations about reach- 
ing an adult audience that was largely white. So his 
own device was to write for children, "for the sixth 
and seventh grade." "I would address myself to minds 
that were not so firmly set." Bontemps added: "At the 
time the minds of adult Americans were substantially 
closed, Americans in general were so hardened, atti- 
tudes were so crystallized." He wrote for children 
"Lonesome Boy," "Sad-faced Boy," and "Golden Slip- 
pers," among others, a captivity literature that like 



Countee Cullen's "can serve as a metaphor for the hu- 
man experience." It is, for him, a gentle dreamy human 
experience: the style of the man and his work reflect 
this. It is a style that has, of course, suffered reversals. 
Also reversed has been the need to find an acceptable 
style, form, or topic for the black writer, to write pop- 
ular novels about whites or to compose children's 
stories. What has also developed is the belief that 
black writing cannot be criticized from the basis of 
white critical standards; one recalls critic Richard Gil- 
man saying that Eldridge Cleaver writes about so many 
things that Gilman, who is white, cannot understand. 
Criticized at times as sentimental and derivative, 
the Harlem Renaissance has become the heart of the 
black republication, as books by Hughes, Toomer and 
others have been reissued. It involved a very large out- 
pouring of poetry and prose. Bontemps was one of the 
movement's leading figures. Countee Cullen was an- 
other. And jean Toomer, whose novel Cane was recent- 
ly reissued, and the poet Paul Laurence Dunbar. Arna 
Bontemps attracts as one of the only surviving figures 
of the movement. Currently he is a lecturer in Ameri- 
can Studies at Yale and curator of the James Weldon 
Johnson Memorial Collection. 



Yesterday he discussed "Hold Fast to Dreams:" It 
may have been a poem in prose, a child's story, an ex- 
tended homily. It was not to be completely associated 
with Martin Luther King's speech at the Washington 

Monument in 1963. But there was an association. King 
used patterns of speech from rural preachers in the 
south and from the poetry of the Harlem Renaissance. 
A Langston Hughes poem supplied the content and 
form for King's speech. "King was immersed In our 
poetry," Bontemps said. "He projected that attitude. 
His style of speaking was not original with him." 

Bontemps said that there have been periodic up- 
surges in the literature of captivity. "We are now in 
a period," said Bontemps, "of revival and revolution, 
of real ferment." The Harlem Renaissance explains a 
number of things about the literature: it explains the 
language and the mood. Bontemps said, "This is a peri- 
od of inspired action, of demonstration. It bears a real 
relation to the stage." Lorainne Hansberry's "A Raisin 
in the Sun" started the current emphasis on black 
drama in the middle fifties. Bontemps suggested an 
indebtedness to the Harlem Renaissance. "Dreams are 
back in style." 



THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 



VOLUME XC1X 



BOWDOIN COLLEGE. BRUNSWICK. MAINE. FRIDAY, JANUARY 16. 1970 



NUMBER II 



Cain And Hutchinson 
Are Rhodes Scholars 



By JOE COVE and FRED 

crsicK 

Two sons of Bowdoin brought 
the college fame over vacation 
by becoming the 17th and 18th 
Rhodes Scholars in Bowdoin's 
history. Bruce Cain 70 and Den- 
nis Hutchinson '69 received the 
coveted awards. 

"We're fortunate in being the 
only college in the country to 
have two Rhodes Scholars," com- 
mented Roger Howell, who nomi- 
nated the candidates for the 
scholarship. "This is better than 
colleges like Carelton with which 
we like to compare ourselves." 

Hutchinson, who until last 
spring was editor of the Orient, is 
studying at the University of 
Chicago. Cain, when queried by 
the Orient as to why he came to 
Bowdoin, said that he did it on 
the advice of his high school 
counselor. The counselor told 
him that he needed to build up 
his confidence; he needed to be 
"a big fish in a small pond." So 
he came to Bowdoin. 

The scholarship, set up under 



the 1903 will of the South Afri- 
can gold and diamond magnet, 
Cecil Rhodes, provides the recip- 
ient with $2,800 a year for a min- 
imum of two years study at Ox- 
ford. To qualify a candidate 
must show "character, leadership, 
and physical vigor." All candi- 
dates must go through a three 
stage selection process. First, 
they must be nominated by their 
college. Eight Bowdoin students 
were nominated. The candidates 
are reviewed by a six man state 

board- 

Cain has said that he plans to 

study politics, philosophy, and 
economics at Oxford. Hutchin- 
son plans to study jurisprudence. 

The article which appeared In 
Friday's issue of the ORIENT, 
concerning the election of two 
Freshmen to the Governing 
Boards has no basis In fact. 
Neither the news staff of the 
ORIENT nor the Freshmen bear 
responsibility for the publication 
of that article, which was put in- 
to the paper without the authori- 
zation of the Editor. 



Afro- Am Center Opens 
-Commemorates King 



By JEFF DRUMMOMD -— 

One of the objectives for the 
Afro-American Center Which 
opened yesterday was to deepen 
the cultural identity of the blacks 
at Bowdoin College. As the 
Bowdoin Alumnus says: the house 
"should help make the black stu- 
dent aware and proud of his heri- 
tage and it should convey to the 
white community an understand- 
ing of that heritage and an ap- 
preciation of the contributions of 
black men to world culture." Ob- 
viously, "a college can never iso- 
late itself from the social condi- 
tions in which it operates, (and) 
without black students to learn 
from, the whites would leave 
Bowdoin ill-equipped to cope with 
racism or social injustice." 

It was in this spirit of recogniz- 
ing the need for reconciliation of 
blacks with whites that the Bow- 
doin Center for A fro- American 
Studies was formally inaugurated 



on the birthday anniversary of 
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 
When Richard Adams, '7.'1, first 
thought of opening the house on 
that day, he was hoping that the 
day would become a day of na- 
tional observance. The Afro-Am 
organization consequently con- 
tacted other Afro-Ams at 450 col- 
leges and universities, and the 



could not attend due to sudden 
illness. Her performance, which 
was a benefit for a scholarship 
fund for black students, will 
hopefully be re-scheduled for 
March. 

The activities began at nine 
o'clock with registration for the 
workshops, or seminars, which 
were to be conducted at one that 



Colleges, High Schools Praise 
Elimination Of College Boards 




By JOHN WEISS 

Earlier this semester the faculty of Bowdoin de- 
cided to eliminate the SAT and CEEB requirement 
for admissions. The new school policy, sponsored 
by Director of Admissions Richard Moll, states 
that these tests are optional. Early in December 
Mr. Moll sent many letters to secondary schools, 
colleges, and universities explaining Bowdoin's new 
policy on standardized tests. The replies have 
been overwhelmingly favorable. In fact many of 
the responses Mr. Moll has received approve even 
substantial changes in the educational process and 
in educational administration. 

A representative sampling of quotes from secon- 
dary school responses indicates how favorably 
Bowdoin's new policy has been received. A secon- 
dary school councilor from Hudson, Ohi owrote: 
"Your report about eliminating the CEEB require- 
ment just arrived, and it is an excellent one. 
Might your secretary send me fifty or so more 
copies. . . ." 

From Wiscasset, Maine. 

"May I take tne opportunity to commend you and 
Bowdoin for your courage to decomputerize the ad- 



missions scene in the face of overwhelming pres- 
sure to do everything by the numbers." 
Kingston, Pennsylvania replied: 
Now, if only the other colleges Would follow Bow- 
doin's footsteps, then we at the secondary school 
level would be greatly helped. Needless to say, 
students would be too. Perhaps the millenium 
would be reached if ranking and grades would go 
by the window. A most pleasant thought. 
Director of admission at East Brunswick, New 
Jersey; We have felt for some time that these 
tests have been given undo emphasis by many col- 
leges. . . . and therefore we applaud your efforts to 
base your decisions on more meaningful criteria. 
From Exeter, New Hampshire: 
. . .my hearty congratulations for having the cour- 
age and the wisdom to set precedent. As optional 
criteria they will serve as — as required criteria 
they have ruled us! 

The headmaster of a boarding school in Metaire, 
Louisiana wrote: 

I have long felt that the emphasis on CEEB-SAT 
scores had become unrealistic. I am certain that 

(Pica** turn to page 5) 



Student Council wrote to the stu- 
dent government of more than 
800 educational institutions, urg- 
ing them to hold similar cere- 
"rnonies. Several important of- 
ficials, including Senator Ed- 
mund Muskie, were invited. 

On January 9, Governor Ken- 
neth Curtis of Maine proclaimed 
January 15th "Martin Luther 
King, Jr., Day," specifying that 
the Student Council and the Af- 
ro-American Society of Bowdoin 
have urged Jan. 15th to be set 
aside as a national holiday "in 
memory of Dr. King and the 
ideals for which he lived and 
died." Edmund Muskie also 
sent a telegram supporting the' 
idea and the Center; unfortunate- 
ly, he had to be in Chicago on 
that day. 

The other major disappoint- 
ment of the day was that Miss 
Mahalia Jackson, gospel singer, 



afternoon. Then at ten, in the 
first formal ceremony of the day, 
President Howell gave the keys 
of the Center to Paul Wiley, 
Vice-President of the Society, 
and House Manager. Howell 
spoke for a few minutes on what 
he believed the purpose of the 
Center to be. As a focus for 
black ideas and education on the 
Bowdoin campus, the Center is 
supposed to deepen the cultural 
identity of the blacks, and at the 
same time, by exposing the white 
student to black ideas, "to serve 
a deep and crucial need for the 
white student." "King's ideali 
of humanism and love for fellow 
man are necessary in the society 
we now have; we must discard 
them as we "grow inwardly and 
search deep within ourselves" for 
a brotherly love. Above all, we 
must "accelerate growth of gen- 
(Pleaae turn to page 4) 



PAGE TWO 



* - 



tAe'bowdcmn orient" 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, I9 70 



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Student-Taught Co urse 



3 CEP Approves Gov 22 



By ALAN KOLOD 

Wednesday the Curriculum and 
Educational Policy Committee ap- 
proved a modified version of the 
proposed student-taught Govern- 
ment 22 course. The CEP will re- 
port ^its action to the Faculty 
Monday. The proposed course was 
originally to be offered by the 
eight Sophomores under the 
loose supervision of Professors 
Rensenbrink and Lewis and stu- ) 
dentsj were to be graded under a 
pass-fail system by their student- 
instructors. This plan was at- 
tacked, however, by members of 
the faculty who questioned the 
teaching competence of the eight- 
and the wisdom of allowing them 
to grade their fellow students. 

In order to meet the objections 
of the faculty as expressed by 
the CEP, the government depart- 



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ment agreed to sponsor the 
course as one of its regular of- 
ferings. Professor Rensenbrink 
and Lewis will be formally re- 
sponsible fcr teaching the course 
Randy Curtis, one of the eight 
explained that this means they 
will advise the student instruc- 
tors on the selection of course 
materials, will grade the instruc- 
tors-, and, with the assistance of 
the student-instructors will 
grade those enrolled in the 
course. In addition, grades will be 
given under the present rather- 
than the proposed pass-fail sys- 
tem. 

Some of the eight regarded the 
changes as trivial and beside the 
point, though they were disap- 
pointed that grades would not be 
pass-fail. One student thought it 
ircnic that the faculty questioned 
the sutdents' ability to teach and 
then insisted grades be as precise 
as possible. 

Professor Rensenbrink has 
written in praise of the course: 

"I have observed six free semi- 
nar sessions in which the eight 
proposers in different groups of 
two or three led the closs. They 
did very creditably. The sessions 
were characterized by open-ness, 
full discussion, and — most im- 
portant in my estimation a 
steady persistence in fully ex- 
ploring major themes rather than 
getting off on side issues. From 
my knowledge of their approach 
it is evident to me that they do 
not intend to put on the mantle 
or airs Master-Professor, but 
neither are they interested in 
acting as presiders over bull ses- 
sions. They have a serious desire 
to communicate and guide, to 
raise problems, and to cooperate 
with their fellow students in ex- 
ploring and where possible in 
finding answers to these prob- 
lems." 

"I strongly recommend that 
this course be approved by the 
CEP and by the Faculty. I say 
this both because it is a very 
valuable experiment and because 
it promises to be something good 
in itself. 

These young people have some 
things they want to share: things 
like data, materials, tentative 
analyses of social forces in a 
nonwestern setting, suggested 
models of how to understand the 
(Please turn to page 5) 



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FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1970 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 




PAGE THREE 



Committee On Admissions 
Investigates Coeducation 



NEWSMAKERS: Rhodes scholar Bruce Cain (see page 1) and Admissions assistants Rlc flaimdorr Rlc 
Saunders has been named to succeed Robert Ives as an assistant In the Admissions Office. The Job will run 
from JunetoJunfc After that he'll have to find his own college. Roger Renfrew has also been named as 
an assistant. He will only work this summer in the Admissions Office. 



At their annual meeting in 
June, Bowdoin's Governing 
Boards will deal with a report 
that, if implemented, will change 
the essential nature of the col- 
lege. Coeducation, Bowdoin's 
mass erotic fantasy, will be pre- 
sented in precise terms of why, 
how,. and how much. And, hope- 
fully, when. 

Last year the Boards voted to 
Increase the enrollment of the 
College to 1200. The means of 
effecting this increase, and, there-* 
by the question of coeducation, 
were left open. The Committee 
on Coeducation, a subcommittee 
of the Committee on Admissions, 
is currently finding the answers 
to that question. As Chairman 
Edward Geary makes clear, the 
answers are not easy. At well 
as presenting the arguments for 
and against coeducation, Geary's 
committee must accurately define 
and evaluate the institutional 
problems presented by such a 



King Holiday Passed; Radiation Affects DNA 
Hanoi Is Petitioned 



By SAUL GREENFIELD 



By FRED CUSICK 

The Student Council passed a 
resolution last Monday night 
calling on the Governing Boards 
to declare Jan. 15, the birthday 
cf Martin Luther King, a college 
holiday. The resolution also 
called on the Boards to petition 
President Nixon and Congress to 
make Jan. 15 a national holiday. 
Harry Simmeth and John Mc- 
Phillips introduced a resolution, 
which was passed unanimously, 
calling for the humane treatment 
cf U.S. prisoners in North Viet- 
nam. The resolution read: 
Whereas: There are presently 
upwards of 400 members of 
the American Armed Forces 
known to be captives of the 
Viet Cong and North Viet- 
namese; and 
Whereas: ' Evidence exists that 
these prisoners are not ac- 
corded the full protection of 
the Geneva Convention con- 
cerning treatment of prison- 
ers; and 
Whereas : A gesture of reconcili- 
ation on the part of Hanoi 
concerning treatment of pris- 
oners may lead to increased 
sentiment on both sides in 
favor of ending the war and 
would be a commendably hu- 
manitarian act: 
Therefore be it resolved: 
That the Bowdoin Student 
Council undertake the following 
action regarding the Vietnam 
prisoner situation: 

"1. That the Secretary of the 
Council be directed to 
write letters expressing 
the Council's concern to 
Xuan Thuy, head of the 
i. ' North Vietnamese delega- 
tion to the Paris talks, 
asking that Hanoi release 
the names of captives and 
permit inspection of pris- 
ons by the International 
Red Cross; 

2. That the Secretary, also, 
be directed to dispatch 
letters to Sens. Chase and 
Muskie and to Maine Con- 
gressmen calling for a 
joint congressional resolu- 
tion demanding proper 
treatment of prisoners 
and urging the President 
to undertake initives for 
prisoner exchanges at this 
time; 

3. That the Secretary send to 
the President a letter urg- 
ing such initiatives be un- 
dertaken; 

4. That the students be pro- 
vided with proper ad- 
dresses and urged to send 



similar letters to the 
above; 
5. That the Bowdoin Student 
Council undertake to en- 
list the aid of other col- 
lege student councils in 
furthering this effort. 
Bowdoin's first mixer is official- 
ly dead. The autopsy, performed 
at the Student Council meeting 
last Monday night, revealed that 
the patient had died of failure to 
contact the girls' schools soon 
enough, failure to phone schools 
instead of write, failure to time 
the mixer properly, "failure all 
around." The deceased left a 
debt of $250.00 which will be paid 
in part by the Council and in part 
by Blanket Tax. 

The Council also laid to rest the 
proposal of a company called Aca- 
demic Services' Inc. which had 
asked to peddle its wares (student 
fare cards, student discount book- 
lets, discount record clubs, etc.) 
on campus with the help of the 
Council. The proposal was 
termed by one member as just 
"more garbage for the bulletin 
board." 

The election for the presidency 
of the junior class is scheduled to 
be held again after the Council 
voted that one of the candidates, 
Buzz Van Sanford, had accident- 
ally been omitted from the first 
ballot. A new election will be 
held next week. 



Schwartz Will 
Head West 

Professor Elliott S. Schwartz 
of the Department of Music will 
be Visiting Lecturer at the Col- 
lege of Creative Studies at the 
University of California at Santa 
Barbara during the school's win- 
ter quarter. 

The award-winning composer 
has been commissioned by the 
College of Creative Studies to 
write a new work which will be 
premiered during his stay there 
from mid-December to early 
February. The new work is 
"Miniconcerto" and is scored for 
flute, oboe, violin, viola and 
cello. 

While visiting the West Coast, 
Professor Schwartz will lecture 
and present a program at the 
University of California at San 
Diego, and will speak at the Uni- 
versity of Southern California 
and the University of Oregon. 



Dr. Franklin Hutchinson of 
Yale University gave a lecture en- 
titled, "D.N.A. and Radiation" on 
Thursday, January 8. Dr. Hutch- 
inson was a member of the 
Chemistry Department at M.I.T. 
He was Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Biophysics at Yale. In 
the year 1963, he was a Guggen- 
heim Fellow at London Univer- 
sity. 

Dr. Hutchinson pointed out 
certain very practical reasons for 
studying ionizing radiation in ref- 
erence to cell behaviour. In the 
field of medicine, ionizing radia- 
tion is used to control cancerous 
tissue growth. Scientists are 
concerned about the effects of 
ionizing radiation on men during 
space travel, where there is no 
atmospheric shield against such 
radiation. A third definite rea- 
son for studying the effects of 
ionizing radiation is that as a re- 
sult scientists may learn a great 
deal more about the functionings 
of the cell. 

In the experiments carried out 
at Brookhaven National Labora- 
tory and elsewhere, scientists 



noticed that the only function of 
the cell markedly affected by 
radiation was the ability of the 
cell to replicate. Microbeam ex- 
periments were carried out, 
where the ionizing radiation was 
aimed at specific parts of the cell. 
Only when the beam hit the nu- 
cleus, was the cell affected. 

Dr. Hutchinson outlined some 
of the reasons why scientists 
suspected D.N.A. to be the af- 
fected chemicle. ' One' obvious 
fact was that most of the D.N.A. 
is in the nucleus. Scientists, 
through experimentation, proved 
that D.N.A. content has a defi- 
nite correlation to the level of 
radiation required to kill a cell. 
Scientists also replaced Thiamine, , 
one of the four major components 
of D.N.A., with another chemicle 
and observed changes in radia- 
tion sensitivity. Therefore, the 
conclusion was that D.N.A. is af- 
fected by ionizing radiation and 
plays a major role in cell behav- 
iour when subject to this radia- 
tion. Another outgrowth of this 
study was that scientists became 
aware of an enzyme system that 
repairs or attempts to repair 
damaged D.N.A. 



program. Expansion of College 
facilities in such areas as hous- 
ing, counselling, medical care, 
and physical education would cer- 
tainly be necessitated. Other 
problems, some of them far more 
complex, must also be solved. 
The departmental impact is one 
such problem. Where and how a 
significant number of girls would 
alter the Bowdoin curriculum is 
a question that Geary's commit- 
tee seeks to answer in dollars 
cents. Additionally, the commit- 
tee must make concrete proposals 
no where the girls would come 
from and how they would be in- 
tegrated into the four classes. 

Reports from other colleges, in- 
cluding Princeton and Williams, 
are being studied in an attempt 
to determine their relevance to 
the situation here. When the re- 
port is completed, it will be, to 
as great an extent as possible, 
definitive. It will be compared 
to alternative plans such as the 
establishment of a graduate stud- 
ies program and acted upon. In 
June the fantasizing will be over. 

Cqmmager - 
On College 

Amherst, Mass. — (LP.) — 
The way to change society is 
through politics, not through the 
universities, according to noted 
historian Henry Steele Com- 
mager. 

"The university is the most 
unique and least corrupt institu- 
tion in society," he said. "Destroy 
it and you destroy civilization." 

Radical students who think 
they can capture the university 
and re-structure corrupt society 
from that base of operations are 
not realistic, according to Prof. 
Commager, who teaches Ameri- 
can government . and history at 
Amherst College. He made it plain 
that American universities are not 
to blame for the war in Vietnam 
— "the university didn't start it 
and can't end it" — any more 
than they are for the problems of 
pollution, racism, overpopulation, 
urban blight or anything else. 
(Please turn to page 6) 



Freshmen Find Bowdoin Weak 
Socially, Stronger Academically 



By SAUL C.REENFDSLD 
and JEFF DRUMMOND 

Jon Gitlin, a member of Sigma 
Nu, applied to Bowdoin Early De- 
cision. He was influenced in his 
decision by an admissions officer 
at the college. Now that he is 
here he is generally satisfied. He 
finds the academics challenging 
and the social life adequate. 
When asked about the fraternity 
situation at Bowdoin he said, 
"For kids who find enjoyment in 
the aspects of fraternity life, 
whether it be downing a keg of 
beer or the "experience" to be 
gained by living with other peo- 
ple, fraternities are fine. I per- 
sonally detest some of the maso- 
chistic perversion I have observed 
at a few of the fraternities." Mr. 
Gitlin seems to be especially irked 
by the cal requirement He ob- 
served that, "It was once said by 
the Greeks that a sound body was 
necessary for a sound mind. The 
Greek hegemony collapsed a few 
thousand years ago, and hopefully 
that idea died with it. I came to 
the college to be educated in what 
interests me, not to be coerced 
into the appropriate physical con- 
tortions." 

Chuck Jones was impressed by 



Bowdoin's academic reputation 
but came here because he was not 
accepted at Amherst. He liked 
the fact that it was in New Eng- 
land. Chuck is not satisfied at all 
with the extra-academic life at 
Bowdoin. As a matter of fact, he's 
seriously considering transferring 
out. He feels that "a constructive 
weekend is impossib^pThe school 
refuses to enhance the social life 
of the independents. There is an 
unhealthy attitude toward the op- 
posite sex due to the unnatural 
environment here. Guys lose the 
proper respect for girls and de- 
velop unhealthy relationships. 
This college doesn't mature you. 
Fraternities exaggerate the prob- 
lem. The unnatural atmosphere 
drives one to drink. Chuck also 
criticized the lack of culture on 
campus (ie. more concerts and 
plays). 

Larry Sheppard, also an inde- 
pendent, came to Bowdoin from 
Florida. His- main reason for 
coming was to be near his girl 
friend. He applied Early Decision. 
Mr. Sheppard is satisfied with 
every aspect of Bowdoin life. He 
finds the academic atmosphere 
more than adequate and, of 
course, he has no complaints as 



far as "extra-acadenuc" activity 
is concerned. He considers frater- 
nities "good for some people." He 
stated however that, "They are 
not worth the money charged 
when the charges are compared 
with the advantages." Larry 
found the swim test useful and is 
glad he has the opportunity to 
learn how to swim. 

Barry Browning, a member of 
AD, also applied early decision to 
the college. He is satisfied aca- 
demically but he finds many faults 
with the general atmosphere of 
the college. He stated, "Bowdoin 
desperately needs women on cam- 
pus. There is an unnatural atti- 
tude towards women prevalent on 
campus. Some Bowdoin men don't 
know how to treat them. They are 
more interested in accomplishing 
the quick make rather than treat- 
ing women as individuals. A girl 
here is an object rather than a 
person." Mr. Browning observes 
that, "Fraternities are very con- 
servative. They refuse to adapt to 
a changing student attitude and 
as result they probably won't sur- 
vive." 

Pete Avery dropped at TD but 
then dropped out He find* that 
(Please turn to page 5) 



PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, JANUARY lb, 1970 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Volume XCIX 



Friday, January 16, 1970 



Number 11 



Black Center Opens 



(Continued from page 1) 

uine human understanding: in our- 
selves." Wiley also said a few 
words on the Center's purpose, 
and agreed with Howell that as a 
focal point for education of the 
blacks, the house could help focus 
the deepening* of humanism in 
both black and white students. 

At 10:30 the activities moved 
to the Senior Center for speeches 
by three students and Howell. 
Paul Wiley, as coordinator for 
the day, introduced each speaker. 
Bob Johnson spoke first on the 
role of the Afro-Am Society at 
Bowdoin and beyond. 

He prefaced his talk with sev- 
eral remarks about Mr. Arna 
Bontemps, the speaker for that 
afternoon. Johnson then dis- 
cussed the two specific proposals 
which he felt were necessary for 
this country to survive. First, 
he believes it necessary to edu- 
cate the whites of this country, in 
order that they may learn human- 
ity; and it is necessary to edu- 
cate the blacks so that they may 
practice humanity. Secondly, 
Johnson would like to set up a 
black internship program for 
promising ghetto children. His 
idea is to spot junior high school 
kids with potential, and to ensure 
that they learn to find meaning in 
their friendships and in their 
lives. Before blacks can have 
any kind of meaningful relation- 
ship with whites, they will have 
to learn to get rid of their ha- 
treds, love each other, and really 
be brothers; only then will they 
be able to deal with the white so- 
ciety as a society of people, and 
not of oppressors. 

Richard Adams spoke next on 
the significance of January 15th. 
In a short essay, or "message to 
America," Adams discussed the 
purpose of observing Martin Lu- 
ther King Day. His speech was 
centered on the question King an- 
sarered: it is no longer a ques- 
tion of violence or non-violence. 
The choice now is between non- 
violence and non-existence. 
Adams' stated his point very 
clearly: "America — change it or 
lose it;" 

Eldridge Butler's topic was 
"Martin Luther King, Jr." He 
gave a very impressionistic pic- 
ture, full of complimentary ideas ; 
many of the ideas and thoughts 
he presented as Dr. King's are ex- 
cellent generalizations. The ques- 
tion is: were they accurate, and 
did they present the whole pic- 
ture of Dr. King's ideals? One 
student said, "Sure, they were 
great as far as generalities go. 
But we never heard any of his 
concrete, specific ideas or actions, 
and they are also part of the 
man," 

Butler spoke of King as a man 
whose crime was honesty, and a 
failure to abide by hypocrisy and 
slaveocracy; "a runaway whose 
crime was brilliance;" a man 
a few compensations for failure 



and made people think it was 
progress;" a modern Patrick Hen- 
ry (Give me liberty or give me 
death!). 

Without question, Butler's 
speech was the most entertaining 
and controversial of the day. It 
was consequently the most inter- 
esting and the best-received. 

President Howell then spoke on 
"Bowdoin and the Black Stu- 
dent." After discussing the prog- 
ress Bowdoin has made, he went 
on to say that "we are not here 
to celebrate victory, but to re- 
dedicate ourselves to the fight." 
The Center helps, he said, in two 
ways. First, it will give the 
black students a sense of com- 
munity and help them in their 
search for themselves; secondly, 
it will serve as a center for the 
open exchange of ideas between 
blacks and whites. 

Howell stated Bowdoin's com- 
mitment to blacks in three fields. 
Recruitment is one way the Col- 
lege can make a significant con- 
tribution to the black community. 
In the curriculum the college can 
assist the blacks in their search 
for identity. Finally, the college 
can make every possible effort to 
improve the social situation on 
campus for the black students. 

That afternoon three work- 
shops met to discuss non-vio- 
lence. The suggested topics for 
the groups were non-violence: a 
technique or a philosophy? non- 
violence: spirituality vs. practi- 
cality; none-violence in the '70's; 
and what is non-violence? In two 
of the workshops there seemed 
to be great tension, mostly due 
to the fact that without excep- 
tion the blacks sat on one side of 
the room and the white on the 
other. The other major prob- 
lem was that in the same two 
conferences, most of the black 
students were freshmen, who just 
do not know enough about Bow- 
doin now to make large general- 
izations. In the third workshop, 
the people were the best in the 
college (Rensenbrink, Butler, 
Johnson, Greason), and the ac- 
tual integration of the group 
gave it less of a divided feeling. 

Arna Bontemps spoke at three 
o'clock: HOLD FAST TO 
DREAMS was his subject. The 
great thing about Bontemps, as 
cne faculty member said, was 
that he was such a dynamic man 
in such troubled times, and he 
was so serene, so calm, that he 
was a completely different experi- 
ence. Bontemps, a poet of the 
famed Harlem Renaissance of the 
Depression and War Years, spoke 
as a poet; using poetry's images 
and figures of speech, he dis- 
cussed King's speeches and their 
sources: about the dreams of 
black children in the ghetto; 
about this age of miracles where 
any dream could come true. And 
th's is the final question of the 
day: Will the dream of Martin 
Luther King in fact come true? 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Member of the United States Student Press Association 



Editor 

Alan Kolod 

MntfiM Editor 

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Circulation Manager 
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EDITORIAL BOARD 
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THE BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
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£^}^J^Iy wheri eteaaai are held daring the Fall and Spring Samaater by the 
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LETTERS TO 
THE EDITOR 



own ideals, careers, plans, programs, developments, 
and trade — in universal prosperity and PEACE. ' 
3. Help to perfect, organize, and operate — Au- 
tonomous (self-governing) Branches of THE UNI- 
VERSAL EXCHANGE — in ALL Communities 
of ALL Nations. 



YAF Speaks 



Help Wanted 



Dear Mr. Editor: 

Please publish the following appeal for help, and 

the enclosed starting point suggestions. 

Thank You, 
Jay Creswell, Senior 

HELP WANTED FROM STUDENTS OF ALL 
NATIONS 

The world's problems, and the solutions to those 
problems, that are already known to mankind — 
are so very great — that they require the very 
best study, thinking, and work of ALL. 

Please help, in these specific ways: 

1. Help to perfect, and to negotiate with ALL 
People of ALL Nations 

—THE UNIVERSAL EXCHANGE — 
GENERAL LIVING AGREEMENT, 
TRADE AGREEMENT, CONTRACT, FI- 
NANCING AGREEMENT, and, PEACE 
TREATY. 

2. Help to create, operate, and manage — THE 
UNIVERSAL EXCHANGE Corporation, as a co- 
operative, private, profit-making, taxpaying, fi- 
nancial institution (owned by ALL the People of 
the universe) — to provide abundant financing for 
ALL Students, ALL Schools, ALL People, ALL 
Communities, and ALL Governments — for their 



To The Editor; 

The Young Americans for Freedom of Bowdoin 
College would like to congratulate the members of 
the Afro-American Society on the opening of their 
Center. 

We would also like to commend them for the ex- 
cellence of the program planned for Martin Luther 
King Day. By showing themselves to be a con- 
structive force on campus, the Afro-Ams are doing 
justice to his memory. 

Congratulations again, 
Bowdoin Y.A.F. 

Misplaced Goncreteness 

Editor, 

Your condemnation of ,the proposed student- 
taught course, Government 22, as a failure to ad- 
dress the issue squarely of whether or not the edu- 
cational structure at Bowdoin is failing would have 
carried much more weight if you had stated specif- 
ically where the structure should be examined for 
possible failure. If you are not willing to be spe- 
cific in stating your proposal for examination of 
the structure, then in the meantime you should 
leave concrete proposals for innovation like Gov 
22 alone. I would like to see you state why you 
feel more basic changes are necessary than inno- 
vations like Gov 22. 

Robert Porteous 73 



Krosnick Thrills Students 
With Talk And Wisdom 



By PETE WILSON 

There is much in the way of 
praise for cellist Joel Krosnick, 
last weekend's visiting artist in 
this year's concert series. Antici- 
pating next year's concert format 
changes, the music department 
invited Mr. Krosnick to reside on 
campus for more than the usual 
one-night stand. And that he 
amiably did. During his three 
day stay, the young and talented 
cellist gave two formal evening 
concerts, read student composi- 
tions, played informally in the 
Moulton Union, and was even 
heard performing the David- 
cwsky electronic masterpiece in 
Professor Ireland's Math course. 
His desire to communicate the 
unique and mellow language 
of his instrument was enthusias- 
tic, even if the attendances were 
not up to full capacity. He is a 
remarkable artist. 

Those in attendance at Mr. 
Krcsnick's second Wentworth 
performance heard him at his 
best. The program was for un- 
companied cello and mixed well 
the old and the new. He present- 
ed two Bach suites. No. 3 in C 
Major and No. 6 in D Major; the 
Schuller Fantasy for Solo Cello 
(1959); Davidowsky's Synchron- 
isms No. S for cello and electron- 
ic sounds (1964-1965); and Ko- 
daly's Sonata for Solo Cello. 
Bach's brilliant writing was truly 
respected 'by the fine technique, 
excellent tone, and warmth which 
came across in Krosnick's art. A 
clarity of line, technical mastery, 
and textural richness character- 



ized the cellist's understanding 
and reverence for the composer's 
genius. (The second Suite Mr. 
Krosnick performed was written 
originally for a five-string cello, 
known in Bach's day as the viola 
pemposa) The Kodaly piece, full 
of the Hungarian folk flavor and 
complete with all registers, is a 
fantastic presto and was per- 
formed with virtuoso skill. Schul- 
ler's Fantasy and Davidowsky's 
Synchronisms brought home to 
the audience, or at least to this 
reviewer, the cellist's utmost 
dedication to the music of his 
time. In all the wild techniques 
and effects of the Schuller work. 
Mr. Krosnick communicated the 
despair and desolate tempera- 
ment of contemporary man's 
plight. It was a rarely moving 
experience. 

These few who heard this gift- 
ed man talk on Monday evening 
— after nearly thirteen hours of 
continuous playing all around 
campus — will hold in their 
memory an experience even more 
gratifying than his formal per- 
formance. His observations on 
total absorption with his art, 
with its beauty, with its ability 
to move him and to touch others 
were a valid lesson in the intangi- 
bilities of music. Mr. Krosnick's 
success at Bowdoin offers prom- 
ise for future week long artist 
residencies and involvement with 
the college community. His was 
a significant contribution to this 
year's musical calendar and simp- 
ly a great experience for those 
who came in contact with his art. 



YAF Urges 
Victory Now 

Spokesmen for Young Amer- 
icans for Freedom, the nation's 
largest conservative youth or- 
ganization, have announced from 
Washington that they have ini- 
tiated a nationwide campaign to 
mobilize nationwide support for 
President Nixon's determination, 
to effectively combat communist 
aggression. 

National Vice-Chairman, Mi- 
chael Thompson, a graduate stu- 
dent at the University of Missou- 
ri, said, "We support the Presi- 
dent's attempt to disengage 
American ground troops in Viet- 
nam. However, we believe that 
if the Vietnamese are to shoulder 
the major burden of the fighting, 
the United States should lift all 
military restrictions and allow 
the South Vietnamese to pursue 
a policy of victory when neces- 
sary." 

"This may be the only way to 
bring about an honorable peace," 
said Thompson. "We would urge 
the President to set a deadline 
for meaningful negotiations by 
Hanoi. Beyond that deadline, the 
South Vietnamese should be al- 
lowed to use air and naval pow- 
er effectively to win the war." 

To continue to permit young 
men to die in a war being fought 
with one hand behind their back 
and in a tactical situation in 
which complete military victory 
is an impossibility, must be re- 
garded as the highest form of 
immorality." 

YAF also announced a petition 
campaign to call upon Hanoi to 
renounce military victory in the 
South. The petitions will be de- 
livered to the Nqrth Vietnamese 
delegation in Paris. 



Editors Don 't Buy Lottery 



By RICK FITCH 

WASHINGTON — (CPS) 
College newspaper editors aren't 
buying the draft lottery. 

Editorial reactions to the induc- 
tion-by-birthdate system initiated 
by the Nixon administration have 
ranged from half-hearted accept- 
ance to anger at the government 
for making false promises, to out- 
right condemnation of the draft 

Small coll«tf7pHftrs have been 
especially ^£etnent_JicT their 
denunciations. TW Knox College 
Student saw the lottery merely as 



a deceptive packaging of the old 
draft, and as another example of 
the influence of the "bloated" and 
"corrupt" military on American 
life. 

"It is frightening. . .to see the 
sickening contradictions between 
the ideals cf free men and reality 
of the Selective Service System," 
the Student wrote. "We are told 
that we must give up for a part 
of our lives our God given free- 
dom, our individuality, our birth- 
right as Americans. 

At one large state university, 
UCLA, the student paper voiced 



concern that the lottery will frag- 
ment opposition to the draft in 
general, and the war in Vietnam. 

The University of Maryland 
Diaiuondback attacked the lottery 
for not lessening the uncertainty 
faced by draft-age males. Point- 
ing out that the eccentricities of 
local boards make it nearly im- 
possible for a registrant to know 
when or if he will be inducted, the 
Dtaiiiondbadk said the Nixon ad- 
ministrations effort to clarify the 
draft for young people "has 
failed miserably." 

(Second in a series on the draft 
lottery's effects.) 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1970 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE FIVE 



Freshmen Look At Bowdoin Peace Corps Pinched 

( Continued from nnsrp n\ fnaoU^..... t_« ■ i . ... A 



(Continued from page 8) 

"Fraternities consist of similarly 
oriented people even though the 
rush is at the very beginning of 
the year. Fraternities really serve 
no constructive purpose." Now 
that he is an independent he finds 
the life outside the classroom to 
be rather poor. He emphasized 
that the situation was the same 
even while he was fraternity 
member. Bowdoin was not Mr. 
Avery's first choice; however, he 
finds the academics here quite 
satisfactory. 

Jeff Gill, an independent finds 
himself at Bowdoin due to a 
strong recommendation by one of 
his secondary school teachers. He 
feels that, "students are not given 
enough time to fully delve into all 
of the subject matter. A great 
deal of subject matter in some of 
my courses is skipped over be- 
cause there isn't enough time." 
Mr. Gill stated that, "there is no 
need for fraternities on campus." 
He also expresses the opinion 
that, "coeducation would provide 
a more natural environment on 
campus." 

Many Freshmen came to Bow- 
doin this fall with certain expec- 
tations. In an attempt to define 
those expectations, and to de- 
termine the extent to which the 
College has fulfilled them, we in- 
terviewed several members of the 
Class of 1973. 

Judging from those freshmen 
interviewed, one can .readily see 
that there is agreement in one 
general area. The freshmen feel 
that major improvements can be 
made in the extra-academic area. 
They find fault with fraternities 
as they now exist. They generally 
feel the lack of coeducation con- 
tributes to an artificial atmos- 
phere on campus which does not 
enhance one's education. The 



freshman interviewed recognize 
some of the problems at Bow- 
doin but feel that they can be 
solved. 

Bruce Lynch applied to Bow- 
doin because "it was the best 
small school I could think of;" Al 
Wright didn't want to fit into a 
pattern that was already estab- 
lished" at a large university. Bill 
Sexton wanted a small school 
where he could do a lot of study- 
ing and get to play soccer. All of 
the freshmen interviewed ex- 
pressed the same opinion Jim Ly- 
ons did: at a small college one 
can always get personal help 
from the faculty. Bowdoin's size 
was one of the major reasons for 
which at least these freshmen ap- 
plied. 

Academically, as Sexton said, 
the Bowdoin workload is heavy. 
Few of the freshmen minded that: 
their complaints and praise were 
in other areas. All agreed that 
the professors were accessible to 
a degree unknown in larger uni- 
versities, and that courses on the 
whole are getting better. Al- 
though Dave Zimmerman felt that 
the course offerings were too li- 
mited, Bobby Porteous also 
pointed out that the new Urban 
Crisis course, despite its prob- 
lems, was a step in the right di- 
rection. However, most of the 
freshman year was felt to be bur- 
densome because of the require- 
ments. The speech and language 
requirements received almost 
universal condemnation. 

Lynch also pointed out that be- 
cause of the small size of the 
school, the offerings and depart- 
ments were more limited than at 
other schools. Zimmerman said 
that the curriculum was "a little 
bit traditional." 

Social life was the most con- 
troversial subject. Although Sex- 



ton said that a social life was 
open for anybody who wanted to 
work a little for it, Lyons and 
Zimmerman violently disagreed 
with him: "the weekends are 
okay If you can get away from 
Bowdoin," said Lyons; Wright 
added that a person is forced to 
completely re-organize his social 
life if he chooses not to join a 
fraternity. Nearly all agreed that 
the College should make some 
provision for the independents. 

Several of the freshmen criti- 
cized the student body for being 
"too apathetic" and "self-cen- 
tered." Wright wondered if this 
was not the fault of the marking 
system which stresses withdrawal 
to the point of excluding inter- 
personal contact; Zimmerman 
thought that the fraternities in 
come cases encouraged this trait. 

Social reform, according to 
most of them, lies in college mix- 
ers inevitable, quick co-education, 
and the establishment of a stu- 
dent center with party rooms. 
Academic reform would mean, ac- 
cording to Wright, an absolute 
pass-fail system; Zimmerman is 
pressing for abolition of the two- 
semester year and the establish- 
ment of the four-one-four sys- 
tem; almost all agreed that the 
requirements have to be abol- 
ished; other than these gripes, the 
class of 1973 seems well satisfied 
with Bowdoin's scholarly stan- 
dards. As for the student body, 
most feel that one of the first 
things which must happen is that 
"independent must stop being a 
dirty word," and that some alter- 
native to fraternities, from party 
rooms t6 recreational facilities, 
must be supplied to the indepen- 
dents; it is also important that 
the student body lose its apathy 
and become involved in current 
issues. 



• 

CEP Approves Government 22 



(Continued from page 2) 

complexity of data, and the bur- 
geoning knowledge that they can 
do this." 

"To be outside the curriculum 
is to be merely tangential to the 
processes of real 'learning, an 
hors d'ouvres or a dessert or 
maybe the cream on the pie that 
may at any moment turn sour 
through lack of concern. They 
ask for a place in the curriculum, 
a special place, a small place. 
They perceive that the curricu- 
lum already has in it a variety 
of academic genres, and they ask 
that the curriculum incorporate 
this dimension." 

The eight students plans to be- 
gin with a two week general in- 
troduction, after which they will 
break up for 4 weeks into rotat- 
ing groups of 3; they will then 
re-assemble for the final 4 weeks. 
The tentative description of the 
course is: 

Government 22 Political Modern- 
ization and Cultural Change: 



Selected Themes from Coun- 
tries of the Third World 

The course will deal broadly 
with political and related cul- 
tural trends among Third 
World peoples. It will treat in 
a fairly intensive and inter-re- 
lated way selected aspects of 
some of the major forces that 
are present in the underdevel- 
oped situation: the role and 
status of tradition and tradi- 
tional culture; , the role of 
elites and the quest for iden- 
tity; the political organiza- 
tional and technical problems 
of development, especially ru- 
ral development; the nature 
of the continuing Western 
economic and political impact; 
racial and neo-colonial ex- 
ploitation; and third world 
nationalisms and ideologies. 
During the spring of 1970, the 
course will be oriented to the 
African continent, primarily 
black Africa south of the Sa- 
hara. 



The course will be taught as 
a multi-faceted seminar in 
which the students will at 
some points do individual in- 
dependents study, at o ther 
times will work in small 
groups of three or four with a 
student instructor, and at still 
other times, especially during 
the early and late phases of 
the course, will meet all to- 
gether for lectures, discus- 
sions and reports. Thorough 
evaluation of the course, of 
the class and of the instruc- 
tors will take place during the 
final week. 

Pre-requisites : Government 
21, or History 34, or the con- 
sent of the instructors. 
During the spring of 1970 the 
course will be taught by 
Messrs. Bucci, Curtis, Fend- 
ler, Fudge, Hastings, Macln- 
tyre, Mills, and Parsons under 
the general academic supervi- 
sion of Messrs. Lewis and 
Rensenbrink. 



College Boards Eliminated 



(Continued from page 1) 

you will be able to retain the same high standards 
you are known for and you will have even more 
outstanding applicants than before. 
From Wheat Ridge, Colorado: 
I am so impressed with your mailing on the sub- 
ject of testing for college entrance that I feel I 
must take the time out to tell you so. The educa- 
ional process obviously must change, but this is 
sometimes difficult for high schools when colleges 
remain static. 
From Fort Worth, Texas: 

I for one want to express my total great delight. 
One supposes that there is hope after all. Hear! 
Hear! 

But not all the replies were from secondary 
schools. Mr. Moll received responses from several 
colleges and universities. Haverford College Di- 
rector of Admissions stated rather cautiously: 
I thought that your folder about not requiring 
test scores was very well done. It's given us 
something to think about here. I'll be interested 
to hear how you feel about it next fall. 
The head of admissions at Northwestern Univer- 



sity was more enthusiastic but pointed out the 
possibility of additional change. 

I applaud your new policy. I am now curious as to 
the position Bowdoin is taking regarding grades 
verses pass fail options at the high school and col- 
lege level. Certainly the most enthusiastic (and 
earthy) reply came from the Director of Admis- 
sions at Reed College in Portland, Oregon. Iron- 
ically Reed's SAT averages are in the 700's. 

Your guys have guts and style: the statement 
about your faculty's decision to eliminate the test 
score requirement is superb, and I dare say you 
will find others following your lead before long. I 
wish we could follow the first shot of the revolu- 
tion from Maine with a second from the Pacific 
Northwest-but I am afraid that our faculty is suf- 
fering from such an accute case of constipation 
right now that such a move is unlikely. Approval 
of-^he new admission policy and the hope for more 
extensive changes in education seem to be wide- 
spread among directors of admission and guidance 
councilors. If changes aren't effected in the near 
future, the fault certainly won't lie with this group 
of men and women. 



By RICK FTTCH 
College Press Service 

WASHINGTON — (CPS) — Vietnam, Chicago, and People's Park 
are taking their toll on the Peace Corps. 

In so far as they are issues representing alienation from society, mis- 
trust of government governmental authority, and heightened political 
consciousness among the young, they have thrust the Peace Corps, 
which professes to remain apolitical in a political world, into a crisis of 
identity. 

Faced with a steadily decreasing number of applicants and requests 
from foreign nations for volunteers, new director Joseph Blatchford, 
with President Nixon's blessings, has taken steps toward "technologiz- 
ing" the corps by removing some of the manpower burden from po- 
tentially volatile liberal arts graduates or "generalists," and placing 
it on skilled — and older — specialists. 

Whereas in the first eight years of the corps' existence, an average 
of 85-90 per cent of the volunteers have been generalists, the new goal 
is to reduce that number to 70 percent in 1970 and provide the general- 
ists with more extensive technological training. The other 30 per cent 
are to consist primarily of technicians such as statisticians and com- 
puter experts recruited from industries which hopefully will grant 
them special leaves to serve as volunteers. -. 

When Congress approved establishment of the Peace Corps in 1961 
as a part of President Kennedy's New Frontier program and declared 
the corps' purpose to "promote world peace and friendship," its direct- 
tor, R, Sargent Shriver, predicted the first year's involvement of 578 
volunteers would spiral to 17,500 by mid-1968. 

His prediction was not realized. The total number of applications, of 
which approximately 90 per cent were from the ranks of recent college 
graduates, decreased from a peak of 45,000 in 1964 to 31,000 in 1968. 
Today, after some 30,000 volunteers have participated and returned to 
the U.S., the number of volunteers during 1969 stands at 11,000. At 
this time in 1967 there were 15,000 volunteers. 

Most observers credit the decline generally to the social turmoil 
engulfing the country and particularly to young people's disaffection 
with the federal government, its militarism abroad and oppression of 
poor and minority groups at home. 

Many idealistic youths who otherwise might have channeled their 
activist energies into the Peace Corps have not because I hey are un- 
able to reconcile the contradictory hypocrisy of the U.S. government 
maintaining half a million people in one country, Vietnam,, to wage 
war, while at the same time maintaining about one fiftieth that num- 
ber in 50-60 countries for the professed cause of peace. 

"The great wave of middle class idealism on the part of young 
Americans which has sustained the Peace Corps since 1962 is ebbing, 
for the American student middle class . . . has lost its self-confidence," 
opined one volunteer, who cited Vietnam as the main reason. 
4 ' There have been three well-known incidents related to Vietnam 
dissent in the Peace Corps and, all three have underscored the corps' 
basic allegiance to the administration in power, disproving the notion 
that the organization is independent from the aims and purposes of 
U.S. foreign policy. 

When in 1965 a volunteer submitted an article critical of U.S. in- 
volvement in Vietnam to the corps' official publication, the Volunteer, 
Shriver ruled it could not be printed because that would constitute 
"exploitation" of the author's official connection with the U.S. govern- 
ment. ■ ■ 

When then vice president Hubert Humphrey visited Liberia, a group 
of volunteers decided to confront him with their anti-war views. Learn- 
ing of the plan, the top Peace Corps official in Liberia said the volun- 
teers would be dismissed if they went ahead with it. 

In 1967, when volunteers in Santiago, Chile circulated a petition ask- 
ing for "peace now" in Vietnam, they were warned by the national of- 
fice to retract it or disassociate themselves as volunteers from it. One 
volunteer, Bruce Murray, protested the decision in a letter to Jack 
Vaughn, then director, and the letter was publicized in the Chile press. 
Murray was subsequently dismissed by Vaughn on the grounds that 
publication of the letter represented a violation of corps' regulations, 
since he had involved himself in a "local political issue." Eventually, 
Vaughn changed the regulations to permit a volunteer to identify him- 
self as such in a letter to the news media, but the bad publicity from 
this and the other incidents lingered in students' minds. 

A Louis Harris Poll taken in late 1968 revealed that 20 per cent of 
college seniors were fearful of losing their right to free speech in join- 
ing the corps. 

Another sore point has been Peace Corps' recruitment of people 
from minority groups. Many suspect — and they are correct — that 
the corps has largely been the domains of better-off white youths who 
gain entrance by virtue of having gone. to college. Since Blacks, Mexi- 
can-Americans and Indians are unable to afford college, there is built- 
in class and race discrimination in the corps. 

Blatchford admitted in a recent press conference that the corps is 
"almost lily-white." Partially as a result, interest in the organization 
is low among Blacks. A Harris poll taken in 1968 showed that only 
nine per cent of graduating Blacks were seriously considering join- 
ing. Thirty-nine per cent voiced the opinion that the corps exists to 
improve America's image overseas rather than help developing coun- 
tries. 

Highly critical of the Peace Corps are members of the Committee of 
Returned Volunteers (CRV), which recently picketed the White House 
while Peace Corps country directors were breakfasting with President - 
Nixon inside. They carried signs advocating abolition of the Peace 
Corps and chanted, 'Ho, Ho, Ho Chi Minh — we're going to do the 
Peace Corps in." 

As Blatchford met in Maryland with top officials to chart new direc- 
tions for the corps, CRV held an assembly in Minneapolis. The 1200- 
member organization issued a position paper stating it is "convinced 
that real development is often impossible without a revolution that 
carries out an equitable redistribution of economic and political pow- 
er, including nationalization of all resources; one which makes educa- 
tion, employment, housing and medical care available to all the people. 
"The United States opposes any such revolution and the Peace Corps 
is an integral part of U.S. policy. There may well be many superficial 
changes in the Peace Corps structure.from time to time, but regardless 
of these changes, it will continue to function as an instrument of U.S. 
domination. t 

"Therefore we" oppose the presence of the Peace Corps volunteers in 
the Third World. We call for abolition of the United States Peace 
Corps. We call upon present volunteers to subvert the Peace Corps and 
all other institutions of U.S. imperialism." 

But what is really crippling the Peace Corps — on the campuses and 
in the world — is its association with the U.S. government. And that's 
an incurable malady. No government support, no Peace Corps. 



PAGE SIX 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, JANUARY 16, 1970 



"WHAT EMERGES from Songmy — 
just as in the liberal Left's response 
to the murders by Oswald, Sirhan 
and Ray — is an uncontrollable im- 
pulse not to blame the particular 
criminal, but rather to vilify Amer- 
ica generally. The assassinations 
permitted the expression of a deep 
animosity against America, gave 
such feeling a seeming legitimacy. 
As an opportunity to indulge in this 

dark process .■ _ . , 

■ For a f r«» copy of 



Songmy was] 
seined upon al- 
most gleefully.' 



NATIONAL RE- 
VIEW, writot Dopt. 
Y, 130 E. 33 Stroot, 
N. Y. 10014. 



FIELD'S 

Tapes — Records 

Jewelry- 
Musical Supplies 

147 MAINE STREET 
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Commager.^- 

(Continued from page 8) 
"The university can only do 
what it does well," he said — 
"study the problems, make recom- 
mendations, and train the experts 
who can then go out to work on 
them." 

Radical students, he empha- 
sized, don't have any program — 
"they are profound in protest, but 
paralyzed in performance" — and 
many of their demands are trivial. 




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They don't attack things like 
trade unions, which are the most 
discriminatory things around," he 
said. "They attack the university, 
which is innocent and vulnerable." 

Yet they don't seem to know 
their own strength, he indicated, 
citing the student movement be- 
hind the Sen. Eugene McCarthy 
presidential campaign. "Look 
what students in politics accom- 
plished," he said. "They toppled 
a President, changed the course 
of the war in Vietnam and, but 
for a fate, might have elected a 
president. What could they have 
done if they had elected to stay 
together?" 

Prof. Commager, a prolific au- 
thor and commentator, capsuled 
his 'views on a wide range of con- 
troversial topics: 

ROTC — "It should never have 
been permitted on campus In the 



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TEACHERS NEEDED 

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Patronize 

Orient 
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SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 
OPPORTUNITIES 

If you want assistance in obtaining summer 
employment, see Mr. Moulton in the 

Student Aid Office. 

This year the Student Aid Office will attempt to help 
students secure summer jobs through Bowdoin alumni. 
If you are interested, sign up in the Student Aid Office so 
your name will be available to alumni on a referral basis. 



first p'acc. Students didn't dis- 
cover this; it was known 30 years 
a"o. Giving academic credit for 
ROTC is like elving credit for 
football. If you drive it off cam- 
pus, the Army will still produce 
~«ffi>ers anyway." 

BLACK STUDIES — "They 
might be some use for white ther- 
apy, but they are little use to 
blacks. Whatever makes for more 
alienation makes things worse. 
Black studies are not consistent 
with the academic enterprise, 
especially if programs and faculty 
are chosen for color rather than 
competence." 

RELEVANCE — 'This is a 
word used by students when they 
are disappointed because the uni- 
versity has not inspired or guided 
them and because they don't think 
it 'relevant' to their concerns. 
This is not the university's busi- 
ness either. It is not a therapeutic 
institution. Relevance is a subjec- 
tive and individualized response 
which changes every day for 
everybody, In different ways." 

CURRICULUM — "Students 
suffer from a 'tyranny of courses' 
which is a legacy handed down 
from the days when students ac- 
tually were children. Today they 
should be treated as adults, be- 
cause there are too many rules 
and too many courses. There are 
a lot of ways to learn without 
'taking courses.' Yet you can't 
juggle the curriculum to fit every 
current whim or interest" 



Stowe Travel 
Agency 

Tel: 725-5574 

"BOWDOIN-BERMUDA 

WEEK 

in the spring. . . ." 

See or call Mr. Hagan 

at Stowe Travel 

9 Pleasant St. 

Brunswick, Maine 



Student 

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to Europe 

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starting 
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FRIDAY, JANUARY 16. 1970 



Jthe BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 



Friday £e¥i€w^le^Me^e~Bri6{^ 5 



Cub Pucksters and 
Boston State College 

By JOHN MEDEIROS 
for the Orient 

In its last outing before Christmas vacation, the 
Bowdoin Freshman hockey team took a '4-3 victory 
from the hands of Boston State College. The game 
was held before a small crowd on December 16 in 
the Arena. 

The Polar Bears got off to a slow start, and ap- 
peared to be in trouble when Boston's Cotter drove 
in past goalie Tom Hutchinson for the first period's 
only goal, seven minutes and fifteen seconds into 
the game. For most of the period Boston controlled 
the puck, and the Boston team managed to make 
only four shots on the goal. 

The second period saw the situation reversed, 
however, as the Bowdoin first line drove through 
again and again for the goal. The first Bowdoin 
point came only 52 seconds into the period, as Pete 
Flynn drove in unassisted. A scant minute and 53 
seconds later, Dick Donovan scored on assists from 
Flynn and Bernie Quinlan. 

The two teams battled for control of the puck, 
but the Donovan-Flynn-Quinlan team did it again 
at 5:52, as Quinlan's fast footwork put Bowdoin 
ahead by 3 to 1. 

Boston State again took control, and Cotter shot 
past Hutchinson for Boston's second point at 9 :33 
into the period. The Bowdoin Icemen, not to be out- 
done, came back with a goal by Quinlan from Dono* 
van and Flynn to put Bowdoin firmly on top. 

Despite a valiant rally during the final period, 
Boston just could not get past a determined Bow- 
doin defense led by John Taussig, Skip Clarke, and 
Joe Tufts . . . except for one slip just 17 seconds 
away from the end of the game, when Boston's 
Leahy slipped past everybody to score an unassisted 
goal. 



Christmas Bells For 
Varsity Hoop Squad 

By BILL FINK 
Orient Sports Writer 

The third, game of Bowdoin's varsity basketball 
season at Wesleyan in Middletown, Connecticut 
proved to be another link in the ever increasing 
chain of Bear loses. Although- the visiting hoopers 
held a five point half time lead, a strong surge by 
the Cardinals in the final quarter cut short the hope 
of a first victory for Bowdoin. The final score was 
a discouraging 75-62. However, Captain Chip Mill- 
er managed to tally twenty-one points and snag 
twenty rebounds in the vain Bear effort. 

The final game for the varsity basketball squad 
before the Christmas vacation was against M. I. T. 
on the Morrell floor. After suffering four successive 
loses at the hands of their first four opponents, the 
Bears finally made a combined effort and soundly 
downed the Engineers by a lopsided 88 to 69 score, 
in a fine all out effort. 

Tournament play at Central Connecticut College, 
saw Bowdoin pitted against heavily favored Hart- 
ford in the first day's action. The Bears built an 18 
point lead only to succumb to Hartford's heavy 
"press" during the final ten minutes of the contest. 
The finishing touch was made by Hartford's fine 
center, Wayne Augustine, when he sunk a jump 
shot just before the final buzzer to give Hartford 
the game, 77 to 75. 

Saturday, in the consolation game, Bowdoin came 
face to face with its earlier superior, Wesleyan. The 
final score showed an overwhelming second half 
Wesleyan rout, 87-63. Although Steve Carey had 23 
points, only six of these came in the second half. 
Carey was elected to the All-Tournament Team — 
the only Bear representative, and later to the East- 
ern Collegiate Athletic Conference Team of the 
Week. 




Cubs Have High 

Toliver And Co. Underway 

Ken Toliver turned in another great effort to lead the Bowdoin Frosh to their fifth straight 
win against the Colby freshmen, 72-61. Toliver's 28 points helped boost the Cubs to the half- 
way mark of this year's campaign which is one of the best ever. 

At the outset, it looked like an easy win for the Bears, but Colby came roaring back with Steve 

Jasinski and took a 33-32 half- 

And on other campuses . . . 




SEXfAL REVOLUTION ... or, "WHY DONT WE DO IT IN THE 

ROAD?" Two bee, or three bees — that is the question posed in the 
above candid action photo on a nearby college campus where a group 
of biimbulous-aereous was found demonstrating for free and open sex- 
ual relations. One thing is clear from the rather obscured photo — they 
aren't gathering honey. 

In closer proximity to the Bowdoin campus, "Bob, Ted, Carol and 
Alice" offer a somewhat less graphic human sexual response to such 
activities. Don't waste your money. 




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time advantage. Jasinski later fin- 
ished the game with a fine losing 
cause effort of 27 points. 

In the second half it was a dif- 
ferent story as Bowdoin outscored 
the opposition 40-28 and coasted 
to a victory. 

The next stop is Gorham State 
on February 18th where they hope 
to add a sixth victim to their list. 

After holding back a surpris- 
ing third quarter scoring spree, 
the cubs went on to whip a sharp 
shooting Andover Academy five 
88-76 for their fourth straight 
win of the season last weekend. 

After the opening tap, An- 
dover threw in eight points for 
an early 8-0 lead, but when the 
frosh got underway, they pushed 
ahead to, a 20-19 first quarter 
lead which stood for the rest of 
the game. 

In the second half, except for 
a short time in the third period, 
Bowdoin ran over and around the 
opposition with Lee Arris and 
Ken Toliver doing most of the 
damage. They finished with 30 
and 27 points respectively. 

The frosh basketball squad 
captured their third victory in 
four starts. As they dropped the 
M. I. T. Engineers in a seesaw 
contest, 81 to 75. Lee Arris and 
Frank Campignone, both cub 
guards, were cited for their out- 
standing efforts in keeping the 
Bowdoin attack alive far the en- 
tire game. Also turning in an 
outstanding offensive and defen- 
sive effort was center, Kevin 
Douglas. Bowdoin's last fourth 
quarter shooting seemed to pick 
up as the pressure of the evenly 
matched contest became greater. 
This coupled with a few timely 
rebounds helped the Bears to a 
well earned victory. 



DUDE! 





WHERE Till: ACTION IS . . . , as usual, is in front of the opposition's 
goal us Ed Dowd and Ron IV trie keep five I'niversity of Connecticut 
defenders busy blocking a shot on goal. 

Cub Swimmers Split Meets 
With MIT and Portland 

The freshman swimming team traveled to New Hampshire after the 
Christmas Holiday layoff. After losing the first relay, the Cubs found 
themselves behind early in the meet. This loss increased until after the 
diving competition when, down by 12, the squad made a strong second 
half comeback. Tom Costin lead the charge with a record breaking 
2:18.7 in the 200 yard Backstroke, were beaten for the second time in 



John Erikson took first in the 500 
yard Freestyle and was followed 
closely by teammate Ralph Crow- 
ley, who was swimming his first 
competitive 500. When John Ward 
and Ian Pitstick swept the Breast- 
stroke event the Cubs managed to 
grab a slim lead. New Hampshire, 
however, took the final relay and, 
as a result, the entire meet. The 
final score was an extremely close 
46-48. 

-With their first defeat only 
three days behind them, the Cub 
Aqua Squad met an extremely 
strcng M. I. T. in Boston. Again, 
both relays proved fatal to the 
Bowdoin cause as the swimmers 



a close encounter. John Erikson 
captured two first places again as 
did Tom Costin by turning in a 

time of 2:22.5 in the 200 yard 
Backstroke. 

The day immediately following 
the M.I.T. loss, the team was in 
the water again. This time, it was 
to participate in Maine's first tri- 
angular meet. At the Portland 
"Y", the team bounced back to 
its normal winning status by 
scoring 77 points to overrule He- 
bron's 48 and Deering High's 41. 
The meet was never out of Bow- 
doin's control as Cub swimmers 
dominated most events. 



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PAGE EIGHT 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY. JANUARY 16, 1970 



Ic emen T ops in EC AC II; 
Down Colby, tl Conn, Army 

By BRIAN DAVIS 
Orient Sports Writer 

The University of Connecticut proved to be no match (or the varsity Iceman in the arena last 
Saturday night as Bowdoin outscored, outskated, and outraged their second division competi- 
tors. The first period showed only one goal for the Bears, a shot made good by Co-Captain Steve 
Hardy. But the second and third 



periods made up for this defi- 
ciency. Scoring in the second peri- 
od was done by; Block, one goal 
at 3:52 into the period and Ray- 
mond, two goals at 5:25 and 8:59 
into the period. The second peri- 
od's rout was followed with third 
period action by; King, one goal 
at 17:07 and Good, one goal at 
17:14. However, these final two 
goals were apparently acts of re- 
taliation as U. Conn, also scored 
two quick successive goals earlier 
in the same period. 

The only demoralizing factor of 
the entire 6-2 victory was the in- 
jury to Bowdoin goalkeeper, John 
Bradley, early in the second peri- 
od. Until his removal from the 
game, Bradley, had saved ten 
shots on goal, bringing his season 
total to 134 saves out of 145 at- 
tempts. Bradley's knee kept him 
out of action during the Colby 
crush, but he is expected to be 
defending the nets against both 
Vermont and Williams. 

Other varsity hockey action 
this week took the Bears to Wa- 
terville where the preceded to 
destroy the Mules and their sea- 
sonal aspirations. After scoring 
twice in the first period, the Bears 
found Colby in hot pursuit of a 
victory, as the Mules tied the ef- 
forts of Good and Raymond at 
2-2. However, the Bear attack 
would not relent and in the clos- 
ing minutes of the first period 
both Hall and Maxwell scored. In 
the next two periods, Colby made 
'a policy of taking the scoring ini- 
tiative, but in every success they 
found failure, as Bowdoin mim- 
icked their scostks and added one 
without provocation. The final 
score was 8-5. Aside from Hall, 
Raymond and Good, who tallied 
twice, Bear scorers were; Max- 
well, Matthews, and Block, who 
also managed two goals. 
,,,,!#. action prior to and during 
the Holiday season, Bowdoin de- 
feated Army in the first home 
game of the season. In reaction to 
the throng of supporters in atten- 
dance, the Bears held Army score- 
less and coasted to an easy victory 
after three first period goals, al- 
though additional third period 
tally was well applauded. In the 
Second Annual Cleveland Cup 
Tournament, the Bears skated to 
a one and two record, beating 
McGill, 6-2 and losing to Western 
Ontario, 3-1 and Dartmouth, 2-1. 

This weekend's action pits the 
Bears against U. Vt. and Wil- 
liams in home contests on Friday 
and Saturday. 



You ars living- a reality 

i loft years ago . . . 
It quit* nearly killed me. 



Eastern Hockey Standings 



Division I 




Division U 




1. Cornell 


(1.828) 


1. Bowdoin 


(l.Mt) 


2. Boston Col. 


< .»•") 


2. Merrimac 


( .838) 


S. Harvard 


( .887) 


3. Middlebory 


( .758) 


4. Boston U 


< .887) 


4. Hamilton 


( .788) 


S. Providence 


( .887) 


5. Vermont 


( .758) 


«. Colt-ate 


( .88T) 


8. Nichols 


( .788) 


7. Clarkson 


( .888) 


7. Colby 


< .887) 


8. UNH 


( .888) 


8. Holy Cross 


( .848) 


Leading Scorers 


- 


Leading Goalies 




(Div. II) 




(Div. II) 




Murphy (Holy Cross) 
Benson (Williams) 




Bradley (Bowdoin) 
Van Werf (Middlebury) 
rimmons (Colby) 








Batt (Hamilton) 






Mermen at 


3-1 


.-t 






KING SLAPS ONE ON V. CONN, as teammates wait to escort the 
puck to the goat Connecticut allowed the Bears many such scoring op- 
portunities. Six of them were scoreboard material. 



First Swim Victory Over MIT in Five 



By MARTIN FRIEDLANDER 

Orient Sports Editor 

It was a lot like the Amherst meet of last 
season. Bowdoin was facing a squad she 
hadn't beaten in several seasons and MIT 
looked tough. One of the Bear's most ver- 
satile and strongest sophomore swimmers 
was drydocked with mono and the three hour 
bus ride to Cambridge didn't help the team's 
spirits for the 8:30 p.m. meet. 

It all mattered not — the varsity swam 
their best meet of the season yet and de- 
feated a stunned Tech squad, 52-44. It was 
the Bears' third consecutive victory" in four 
meets. With Williams traveling to Bruns- 
wick Saturday, the record is threatened, but 
certainly not doomed. 

The first relay was up for grabs, and both 
squads knew it. With each squad's strong- 
est event men pitted against their counter- 
parts, the Bears shaved seven seconds off 
their previous best time for as- many points, 
the much sought initial victory, and a clock 
reading of 3:58.9. Ken Ryan eased off on 



the final length of his freestyle leg in anti- 
cipation of the 200 IM he was to swim two 
events later. 

The 200 Freestyle fell to MTT, but Jeff 
Meehan pulled an upset first place in the 50 
freestyle with a 23.6 Ken Ryan followed 
suit with another first place time in the 200 
Medlay with a 2:10.9. In' the diving, a dis- 
appointing two-tenths of a point separated 
victory from previously undefeated sopho- 
more diver John Wendler. 

Picking up after the diving, the 200 butter- 
fly saw Barry Stevens set out on a pace 
which sometimes overtook superflyer Bow 
Quinn. However, Stevens died to a 51.0 final 
50, but managed to so psyche out his oppon- 
ent that he was good for the second, follow- 
ing first place Quinn. In the 100 freestyle, 
Parker Barnes came back from his loss in 
the 200 for a victory. Bob Stuart's second 
place in the 200 Backstroke filled in between 
firsts in the free and fly. 

The 500 freestyle proved to be the surprise 
event of the day for MIT coach Charlie Bat- 



terman. After Bowdoin team captain John 
Spencer cut 20 seconds off his previous sea- 
son's best for a victory margin of 14 seconds, 
Batterman increduously asked Spencer if he 
was, in fact, Spencer. He was. 

The Bears secured the meet in the 200 
Breaststroke as Ken Ryan took his second 
first place of the evening with another best 
time for himself of 2:28.5. John McPhillips 
trailed with a third' in the same event. MIT 
was unable to pull out the last relay, increas- 
ing the victory score to 52-44 for the Polar 
Bears. For the first time this season, Bow- 
doin Coach Charlie Butt had first hand ex- 
perience with the MIT pool water. 

The Bears host a perenially strong Wil- 
liams squad Saturday. The Ephs' strength lie 
in their junior freestylers and pose stiff com- 
petition for their Bowdoin counterparts. With 
John Spencer constantly shaving his times in 
the 500 and Jeff Meehan slicing his 50 time, 
the additional untapped strength may prove 
to be the margin necessary to earn the Bears 
their fourth consecutive victory. 



Polar Bearings 







Hockey 






Basketball 




Bowdoin 




4 Army 





Bowdoin 


82 Wesleyan 


75 


Bowdoin 




1 Ontario 


2 


Bowdoin 


87 MIT 


88 


Bowdoin 




8 McGill 


2 


Bowdoin 


75 Hartford 
82 Wesleyan 


77 


Bowdoin 




1 Dartmouth 


2 


Bowdoin 


87 


Bowdoin 




8 U Conn 


2 


Bowdoin 


82 WP1 


84 


Bowdoin 




8 Colby 


8 


Bowdoin * 


88 Colby 

1-H 


78 




vs. 1 JVM Fri. 7:1* 




at Brandeis Fri. 4:00 






vs. 


Williams Sat. 4:80 




vs. 


Williams Sat. 4:00 




Bowdoin 


Fr 


4 Boston State 


2 


Bowdoin Fr. 


85 MCI 


82 


Bowdoin Fr. 


Z Salem State 


2 


Bowdoin Fr. 


88 Exeter 


88 


Bowdoin Fr. 


2 Andovcr 


1 


Bowdoin Fr. 


75 MIT 


88 


Bowdoin Fr. 


8 Colby 





Bowdoin Fr. 


88 Andover 


78 






4-2 




Bowdoin Fr. 


72 Colby 


81 


scrimmage Framina-ham Sat. 






5-1 












at G 








Wrestling- 






Swimming 




Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 
Bowdoin 




% Amherst 
17 Main* 
17 Lowell 


20 

28 
25 


Bowdoin 

Bowdoin 

. Bowdoin 


88 U Mam 
58 UNH 
52 MIT 

2-1 

Williams Sat. 4 :00 


28 
28 
42 


Bowdoin 




18 UNH 


22 


vs. 






vs. 


Brsndeis Sat. 2:88 
Track 




Bowdoin Fr. 
Bowdoin Fr. 
Bowdoin Ft. 


47 Huntington 

48 UNH 
48 MIT 

1-2-1 


47 
148 
54 


Bowdoin 




48 UNH 


58 




Squash 





Mules Kick Bears 
After Tech Wreck 

By BILL FINK 

Orient Sports Writer 
This past week proved disasterous for the varsity basketball squad as 
they suffered two disheartening defeats. Worcester Polytech dealt an 
83-64 death blow on January 10, and more recently the Colby Mules 
downed the Bears, 73-68. 



at MIT Sat. 2 :88 



Bowdoin 8 Harvard "B" 

0-1 



Williams College, R. 

... a retiring sports editor 



Weightlifters "Pressed" . . . 



Bar-belles Drop Weight On Lisbon 



Posing as the Brunswick Barbell Club, the Polar 
Bear ironmen staged a come-from- behind mild up- 
set over the State Champion Lisbon team on De- 
cember 14 by winning 96-93. Trailing by ten 
points going into the final event, the deadlift, the 
Bears swept the first two places with Captain 
Rick Spill winning and Doug MacKinnon getting a 
clutch second. This was the margin of victory 
necessary for the team. 

High scorer for the meet was Mike King of Lis- 
bon with 42 points, including first place in the 
press, snatch, and clean and Jerk. His lifting set 
two Maine State Teenage 165 pound class records, 



a 235 pound press and a 205 pound snatch. Spill 
led the Bowdoin scoring with 31 points, winning 
the squat and the deadlift. MacKinnon added 22 
points. 

Bowdoin men set four Maine State Powerlifting 
records. Doug Sewall led the way with an out- 
standing 215 pound bench press in the 123 pound 
class to break the old record by 75 pounds. Doug 
MacKinnon upped the 242 pound class bench press 
mark to 265. Roy Bouchard's 275 pound squat 
broke his own record in the 132 pound class, and 
Spill's 475 pound deadlift raised the 198 pound 
class standard by 40 pounds. 



The Worcester game, played on 
the victor's hardwood, saw a phe- 
nomenal demonstration of field 
goal accuracy and rebounding on 
the part of the Worcester team as 
they connected on 63 Vr of their 
two-point attempts while holding 
a decided board edge over the hap- 
less Bears. Though the Bowdoin 
men were only four points down 
at halftime, 37-33, the second 
stanza proved to be their undo- 
ing as they were outpointed, 46- 
31. Worcester's attack was com- 
plemented by the fact that all five 
of their starters scored in double 
figures, led by Rooney with 19 and 
Cunningham with 18. Bowdoin's 
Clark Young took the game's scor- 
ing honors, however with 23 
markers, while Captain Chip Mill- 
er contributed 11 points. 

On Wednesday evening the 
Bears traveled to Waterville 
where they were defeated by 
Maine rival Colby College. Though 
Colby led throughout most of the 
contest, the stubborn Bears re- 
mained constantly within striking 
distance as they even held the 
lead for brief moments. Though 
both teams appeared to be evenly 
matched, it was a case where 
Btwdoin miscues, in the form of 
costly fouls and turnovers, pro- 
vided Colby's slim winning mar- 
gin. Vince Bagel of Colby was the 
Tame's leading scorer with 25 
points, with John Rhinehart con- 
tributing 15. Clark Young again 



led the Bears with 19 points while 
Miller pumped in 18 .and John 
Outhuse 14. 

This weekend the Bears face 
Brandeis Friday evening and re- 
turn home Saturday afternoon to 
face Williams. 

Rebounding from their first 
tastes of victory, the Bear iron- 
gamers were not equal to the 
task of coping with a much deep- 
er and more experienced MIT 
team, losing 82-44 in a meet held 
last Saturday in the Sargent 
Gymnasium. 

The Engineers, led by Charlie 
Valverde, last year's third place 
winner in the Junior National 
148 pound class, garnered three 
of the four first places, and all 
four seconds. Valverde copped 
£ the honors in the snatch and 
cleaned and jerk while Ed Crow- 
'y, MIT's captain-coach, won the 
bench press with a lift of 340 
pounds. John Benson, Bowdoin's 
lene bright spot, won the squat, 
and combined with Captain Rick 
Spill, to score 38 of Bowdoin's 44 
points. 

MIT's barbell brood returned 
to Cambridge with a trophy sym- 
bolic of their afternoon's accom- 
plishments, while Benson, Val- 
verde. and Ci'owly each received 
awards for their individual ef- 
forts. Benson, who tied with Val- 
verde as the meet's high scorers 
at 25 point apiece, lost the MVP 
trophy on a coin flip. 



Tragedy Of Biafra Discussed By Rensenbrink, Lewis 



by NORM CAREY 

On Thursday evening, February 5, Mr. John C. 
Rensenbrink, Associate Prcfesscr of Government at 
Bowdoin, and Mr. Reginald M. Lewis, an Associate 
Professor in Government and History, served as 
leaders of a discussion in Wentworth Hall at the 
Senior Center which focused on the problems of 
Biafra. 

After a brief delay the discussicn began with an 
introduction by Professor Rensenbrink in which he 
outlined the evening's format. The first part of the 
discussion was to be a survey of Nigeria's back- 
ground as a colony and would cover three major 
areas: Nigeria from the time of its independence 
up to the time of crisis, the crisis itself, and its im- 
plications. 

Professor Lewis started the synopsis of Nigeria's 
background by pointing out the role which England 
played as an initial catalyst to political ferment. 
As Nigeria's mother country, Great Britain subor- 
dinated the personal welfare of the African colony 
to the exploitation of its resources. The colony it- 
self was shown Wbe trading with England not as a 
unified block but rather as three independent eco- 



nomic entities, the north, east and south. The Eng- 
lish served as a "glue" uniting these areas, but with 
their departure the bond quickly dissolved. The 
cccncmy of the country was not truly integrated; 
jealousies which had existed between North and 
South in the fifties developed into power struggles 
in the sixties. The people were confronted with 
new governmental systems where none had previ- 
ously existed, and the country itself held two hun- 
dred and fifty different, distinct ethnic groups. The 
reasons for what Professor Rensenbrink called "the 
unleashing cf new tensions" were made clear. The 
ncrth and oast combined to form a government 
which excluded the most powerful representatives 
cf the scuth. The British had always favored the 
ncrth, acccrding to Professor Lewis, because she 
cculd more easily identify with their power struc- 
ture. The north had seventy percent of the land 
mass and fifty percent of the people, and it was 
much more unified than Biafra with forty percent 
cf its population being split into independent ethnic 
minority groups. The small tribes began to rise up 
against the north, and soon full scale war had de- 
veloped. The comment was made by Professor Ren- 
senbrink that within a period of a decade, the po- 



litical strugglings in Nigeria had telescoped cen- 
turies of such struggle in Europe. This account of 
the crisis' background lasted for an hour, and served 
as a stable basis on which the ensuing discussion 
could be built. 

The remainder of the evening was spent in the 
discussion cf questions asked by members of the 
audience. Most of these questions involved the fu- 
ture facing Nigeria and its government, and what 
effect the Biafran war would have on other African 
nations. Professcr Lewis introduced a question 
from the panel to the audience, asking "What does 
a geo-political unit have the right of cessation?" 
The discussion ranged from the specific analysis of 
Nigeria's current governmental structure to the 
more general analysis of the moral and political 
problems caused by the refusal of aid by Nigeria 
for the starving Biafrans. 

The discussion of these questions continued for 
more than an hour, and provided the audience with 
a clear, and thorough understanding of the Biafran 
situation. Professors Lewis and Rensenbrink served 
as excellent mediators as well as commentators, and 
it is unfortunate that the attendance at the discus- 
sion was only a third of what it should have been. 



THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOLUME XCIX 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 

BOWDOIN COLLEGE. BRUNSWICK, MAINE. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1970 



NUMBER 12 



WINTERS! 




Boards Reject A Proposal For 
Coeducation For Fall Semester 



Alvin! 



"Alvin Lee is an enigma in show business " 

"Lee is a lean ydung man with shoulder-length blond hair and the 
kind of cool good looks that imply a dangerous sensuality." 

"Lee was very likeable. He had, close up, the kind of soft, near- 
feminine face that in his childhood and early adolescence, must have 
been pretty, and so the subject of abuse as well as desire." 

". . . most photographs one had seen of Lee seemed pretentious 
studies in arch sensuality, as if the photographer had called to him to 
lick his lips before squeezing the shot." 

The lip-licking, lean, sensual, enigmatic, near-feminine, character 
above is Alvin Lee, leader of Ten Years After, the group which will play 
at tonight's concert. Alvin and his companions, Ric Lee, Chick Churchill, 
and Leo Lyons, are a fusion group specializing in "white blues." Like 
all rock groups Ten Years After fears that it may become tod "com- 
mercial." Alvin refuses to write a single: "Once you've had a hit single 
it becomes trendy. . . . We would find ourselves becoming an 'in' group 
. . . and gradually we would stop being musicians and become enter- 
tainers instead." Alvin wants to be a "musician and an entertainer." 
Somewhat like being a virgin and a prostitute. 

Other festivities during Winters will be hockey against Middlebury, 
wrestling against Maine, track against Colby, swimming against 
Connecticut, freshman hockey against Bridgton, basketball against 
Tufts, two performances of The Police at the Experimental Theater, 
and snow sculptures celebrating "150 Years of Maine" by the frater- 
nities. Those Bowdoin men and their dates who are not too busy finding 
snow to sculpture can go watch enigmatic Alvin and his companions. 



by ALAN KOLOD 

The Governing Boards have 
authorized President Roger How- 
ell to invite up to three students 
to attend all meetings of the 
Board of Trustees and up to 
three to attend meetings of the 
Overseers. The students will be 
able to take part in all activities 
of the Boards except voting. 

President Howell , explained 
that he will leave the selection 
of the students to the Student 
Council and that only two stu- 
dents will be invited to meetings 
of the Trustees. There are only 
15 Trustees, compared to 53 
Overseers. Presently, the faculty 
sends two observers to the Trus- 
tees and three to the Overseers. 

Howell also announced that 
the Boards have decided to un- 
dertake a self-study. A commit- 
tee, to be appointed from the 
Boards and other groups closely 
associated,, with the college, will 
examine the membership and 
functions of the Boards and their 
methods of operation. Among the 
questions likely to be considered 
will be the feasibility of combin- 
ing the Trustees and Overseers 
and the wisdom of appointing 
Overseers for fixed periods rather 
than life. 

John Cole, Student Council 
President, and Edward Minister, 
Professor of Sociology, sub- 
mitted a proposal for the admis- 
sion cf sixty women to the Col- 
lege for September, 1070. How- 
ell explained that it would be in- 
accurate to say the Boards re- 
jected the proposal, but they did 
discuss the issue and agreed 
unanimously to await the com- 
plete report of Professor Edward 
Geary's Committee on Coeduca- 
tion rather than, approve a 
"crash program." " Howell em- 
phasized that the Boards were 
neither putting off the issue nor 
disavowing the idea of coeduca- 
tion. They have ordered the 
President to submit a full report 
on the needs of the college, in- 
cluding both plans and time- 
tables for coeducation, at the 
June meeting. 



One of the most important 
factors in the Board's decision, 
according to both Howell and 
Cole, was a letter from Director 
of Admissions Richard Moll stat- 
ing that it would be impossible 
for his office to admit women in 
time for the Fall semester. How- 
ell said the letter contained no 
explanation of why it would be 
impossible. Cole and several of 
those he consulted in preparing 
the report could not understand 
why it would be so difficult to 
recruit sixty female students. In 
several interviews with the Ori- 
ent Moll has said he believes 
Bowdoin should avoid the ap- 
pearance of jumping on the co- 
education "bandwagon." 

Howell thought that Moll's let- 
ter was not the only factor in 



the decision. The Boards are 
seeking a plan for a continuing 
program of coeducation not just 
a crash program. There are cer- 
tain problems such as securing 
medical, housing, and dining fa- 
cilities, which should be antici- 
pated and planned for in ad- 
vance, Howell believes. It is pre- 
cisely these problems the Geary 
Committee is studying. Howell 
admitted that over-planning 
should be avoided and that the 
effects of women on such things 
as the curriculum could be de- 
termined only after the arrival 
of women. 

According to Howell, the ap- 
pearance of slowness in Bow- 
doin's efforts toward coeduca- 
tion is misleading. He claims we 
(Please turn to page 7) 



Freshmen Reveal Hoax 



by FRED CIJSICK 

It is difficult to think of two 
less likely candidates for the 
Board of Overseers than Kenneth 
Santagata and Louis Epstein. 
Moth are freshmen. Both are un- 
known. Both are, depending on 
h:,w you view the matter, either 
adolescent reformeVs or fools. 

The January 16 issue of the 
Orient curried an announcement 
f.n the front page under the head- 
line "Two Undergrads Named To 
Board Of Overseers." The an- 
nouncement told how Epstein and 
Santagata had been elected to the 
Board. It went on to say that they 
were expected to vote at the Feb- 
ruary meeting of the Boards on 
such issues as co-education, an in- 
crease in enrollment, and the re- 
vamping of the curriculum. The 
announcement ended with a state- 
ment by a spokesman of the col- 
lege: "I am pleased that under- 
graduates will be members of the 
Governing Boards. It was a shame 
to believe that a board, whose 
average age is 60 or 65, could 
produce the reforms necessary to 
a progressive education. Perhaps 
now, Bowdoin can make the mean- 



ingful adjustments due such an 
institution. . . ." 

The notice, of course, was a 
hoax. No member of the Orient 
news staff had any knowledge of 
it. As far as can be determined 
(The participants in the affair, 
particularly Santagata and Ep- 
stein, have had trouble remember- 
ing what happened.) the an- 
nouncement began as a fraternity 
prank; changed into a social pro- 
test and ended as a fiasco. 

Early in January Santagata and 
Epstein along with several other 
freshmen met with Peter Hays, 
the newest and youngest member 
cf the Board of Overseers, to dis- 
cuss College policy. Since they 
were meeting with an Officer of 
the College Santagata and Epstein 
wore jackets and ties. After the 
meeting they went to their frater- 
nity, Deke. Some of their frater- 
nity brothers joked about their 
wearing jackets and ties. Santa- 
gata and Epstein replied jokingly 
that they were dressed that way 
because they had just been se- 
lected for the Governing Boards. 
According to Santagata some ot 
the brothers appeared to believe 
(Please turn to page t) 



PAGE TWO 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 19 70 




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Epstein, Santagata Story False 



(Continued from pace 1) 

them. This gave them the idea 
that other people might believe 
them, at least for a little while. 

Beth Santagata and Epstein 
were dissatisfied with the way the 
College was being run. They also 
disliked the "apathetic" attitude 
cf the student body. They saw 
themselves as activists who were 
going to shake the College up and 
get the seniors angry by having 
the appointment of two freshmen 
to the Governing Boards an- 
nounced. 

Santagata and Epstein asked 
Marty Friedlander to help them 
get their announcement published 
in the Orient. Friedlander, also a 
Deke, had just stepped down as 
sports editor of the Orient. He 
had frequently been critical of the 
news policy of the paper, with 
which, as sports editor, he had 
nothing to do. He was also trying 
to establish a new publication with 
College funds which would be 
somewhere between the Orient 
and the Quill. Friedlander told 
Santagata and Epstein that they 
were "crazy" but agreed to help 
them. The scheme originally 



called for the announcement to be 
published on the sports page along 
with the quotations and sayings 
that Friedlander uses to fill out 
the page. Friedlander however 
decided to have it published on the 
front page without the editor's 
knowledge. He persuaded Brian 
Davis, also a Deke and the cur- 
rent sports editor of the Orient, 
to go down to' the printer's late 
Friday morning just before the 
paper went to press and insert the 
announcement. Apparently Fried- 
lander thought that no one would 
bother to ask who had put the 
bogus announcement in. Thursday 
Santagata and Epstein learned 
that the announcement would ap- 
pear on the front page. 

Two faculty members and one 
member of the Administration al- 
so knew about the announcement 
before it was published. Thursday 
morning Epstein told Professor 
John Ambrose that the announce- 
ment would appear in a small box 
on "page five or six" of the paper. 
Ambrose thought that it was a 
good joke. Thursday afternoon 
Santagata told Professor John 
Resenbrink about the announce- 



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ment. Resenbrink recalls Santaga- 
ta coming up to him bursting wifh 
.Ihe^Jiews. Resenbrink thought 
that it was a good form of protest. 
He went home and forgot about it 
until he read the newspaper Fri- 
day. Epstein also told someone in 
the Admissions Office Friday. It 
is impossible to tell whether this 
person knew about the announce- 
ment before the paper went to 
press or not. Epstein, fearing he 
would be "screwed," refused to 
reveal the name of this person. 

The reaction to the announce- 
ment's publication was mixed. 
Many students believed that two 
freshmen had been elected to the 
Governing Boards. Most of the 
Administration and the Faculty- 
thought that it was a good joke. 
Dean Nyhus told Santagata that 
"it was the best thing he'd ever 
seen printed in the Orient" Some 
older faculty members, however, 
were angered. Epstein described 
how he was "blithely walking 
across campus" when a freshman ' 
coming out of the Union told him 
that "Herbie Brown, Sam Ladd, 
and the Alumni Secretary" had 
just picked up their copies of the 
paper and were "ripshit" over the 
announcement. "Here I was, just 
a freshman," Epstein said later, 
"and I already had one of the most 
influential English profs, Sam 
Ladd, and the Alumni Secretary, 
angry at me." He seemed pleased 
with the fact. 

At a meeting of the Orient Pub- 
lishing Company Martin Fried- 
lander admitted that he had lied 
to Alan Kolod, the editor, when 
asked if he had any part in the 
affair and admitted his compleci- 
ty. Santagata had also lied when 
he told several people, including 
Kolod and Dean Nyhus, after the 
publication that he didn't know 
„ how • the announcement . had, got- 
ten there. Those responsible -for 
the announcement paid $40.00 to 
have a corrected edition of the 
paper printed. According to San- 
tagata a collection was taken up 
at Deke. 



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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1970 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE THREE 




Faculty Hears Proposals On 



Procedure, Afro- Am Major 



Starring In Slawomlr Mrosek's "The Police" arc Marda Howell, Peter 
Avery '7S, and Steven Sylvester '73. The play, a satire on a police state, 
is being shown In the Experimental Theatre, Memorial Hall, at 8:15, 
Saturday, Sunday, and Monday. The play Is directed by Prof. Richard 
Hornsby and presented by the Masque and Gown. 

Play Suffers From Poor 
Production And Direction 

by SAUL GREENFIELD 

Slawomir Mrozeck's play, "The Police" opened on Wednesday in the 
Experimental Theatre. The Masque and Gown production successfully 
frustrated the author's attempts at pointed sarcasm and delivering a 
moral message. The play, with witty dialogue, was dampened by some 
unendurable periods of silence, supposedly put in for effect, and by a 
lack of proper casting. 

Hilliard Goldfarb, as the prisoner, just doesn't fit the part. Aside 
from delivering his lines in a consistent monotone, he didn't look like a 
prisoner who had spent 10 years in an East European prison camp. 
His uniform was immaculate and his complexion was as pure arid clean 
as one wh.o had spent 2 weeks on a milk farm. Costuming Jhen % deoided 
to add a ludicrous beard that resembled dyed rabbit." The' prisoner 'was 
afforded many opportunities to heighten the sarcasm of his lines and 
availed himself of none of them. 

Steven Sylvester, as the Chief of Police, although more caustic 
than the prisoner, still didn't bring out the sarcasm in Mrozeck's lines. 
He lacked that evil twinge that could have sent the audience howling. 

Peter Avery was brilliant in his role of the police sergeant. He acted 
as the bumbling government agent with superb, Pirandelloesque, 
gangling grace. He was the most convincing actor in the cast. Every 
line was delivered with the proper intonation, and the audience greatly 
appjr^ia'ted his ^a^'sing about on the stage!- •■ ■--••- •'• •'••' 

It'sflould be noted' thai Marcia Howell played 'Avery's wife" m the 
play. The little she had in the way of lines was amusing in the manner 
the author intended. Geoff Nelson as the General was appropriately 
aloof and sneered at the right moments. However, costuming again 
erred in having him wear wire rimmed sunglasses, which made him 
look like a Hell's Angel rather than a general. 

The play could have been much funnier had all the actors developed 
their lines to the fullest. One heard sentences throughout the play 
that would have been uproarious had the proper intonation and timing 
been employed. Pete Avery saved the play from being totally frustrat- 
ing. The audience coyld easily see Mrozeck's aim of criticizing the 
police state, but the seeing was not as enjoyable as it might have 
been. For this, director Richard Hornby must bear the blame. 



Roles Defined 



A meeting of the Bowdoin 
faculty was held on Monday, 
February 9. The Recording Com- 
mittee presented a special report 
to be considered by the faculty 
listing a number of recommended 
reforms. The committee's re- 
forms, which were first proposed 
in the Orient, include 

1. A student requesting ex- 
emption from a College require- 
ment, permission to study for 
transferable credit at another 
institution, or a similar consider- 
ation will submit his request in 
writing. He may, if he wishes, 
also appear before the Commit- 
tee in person. 

2. A student who has failed a 
sufficient number of courses to 
be subject to action by the Com- 
mittee shall be informed by the 
Dean of the College or the Dean 
of Students in advance of the 
meeting at which his case shall 
come up. Such a student may 
submit a letter in his behalf or 
appear in person before the Com- 
mittee, and he shall be so in- 
formed at the time he is notified 
of his situation. 

All members of the Faculty 
shall be notified, in advance of 
the meeting, of students up for 
action in the event that they 
wish to submit a comment on any 
of these , students. There must, 
however, be 'comments submitted 
to the Committee from any 
teachers who have given the stu- 
dent concerned an "F." A special 
report must also be on hand 
from his adviser. These items 
may be seen by the student if 
he so desires. 

.3. A student who wishes to 
appeal a decision of the Commit- 
tee may take his case before an 
- Appeal Committee consisting of 
the President of the College and 
any two Department Chairmen 
the student wishes to designate. 
(The President, who is presently 
a member of the Recording Com- 
mittee, has agreed to resign 
from the Committee if this pro- 
cedure is accepted so that he 
may chair without prejudice any 
Appeal Committee.) 

The Committee on Curricu- 
lum and Educational Policy also 
submitted a report concerning 



Teach-in Breeds Frustration 



by JAY SWEET 

The "teach-in" is a product of 
the sixties. It is an expression of 
an evolution that includes the 
streets of Selma, the jung4es of 
Vietnam, the president's ^office at 
Columbia, and the streets of Chi- 
cago and Washington. Its end is 
to provide the framework for 
'meaningful dialogue,' for 'involve- 
ment,' for 'relevance.' Last Fri- 
day night in Smith Auditorium, 
the founders of the Connecticut- 
based New England Conference 
for Community Action sponsored 
a teach-in on poverty. For the few 
that attended, the event spoke di- 
rectly to our collective past. and 
present. Our future, however, it 
only suggested. 

The men and women of NECCA 
are not newcomers to the prob- 
lems of America's poor. They are 
all veterans — perhaps survivors 
is a better word — of federal anti- 
poverty work. To a man, they are 
disillusioned with, and embittered 
at, those programs and the gov- 
ernment that originated them. 
Fred Harris, the assistant of 
NECCA, made the premises of the 
organization clear. "The poor to- 
day are made to think and act like 
poor people in order to get any 
thing from the federal govern- 
ment. We are going to deal with 
every structure that makes the 
poor what they are, and the way 



to do this is to start with making 
the poor aware of what the gov- 
ernment is doing to them and 
aware that they must change this 
particular system. We have one 
common goal, one common enemy,- 
and one common way to deal with 
him." 

Harris and his co-workers place 
no faith whatsoever in the federal 
government. The government's in- 
terest, they feel, lies not in eradi- 
cating poverty, but in compound- 
ing it. At the local level, poverty 
program administration is de- 
picted as atrocious. Joan Lazar, a 
Brunswick resident, spoke of pro- 
gram overseers in this state "who 
make women screw before they 
get any money. State programs 
are either non-existant or totally 
ineffectual. NECCA conceives the 
primary solution to the problems 
of the poor as educational. Work- 
ing from a mobile unit, they plan 
to educate representatives of poor 
communities in legal rights and 
techniques of community organiz- 
ing. Their funding, hopefully, will 
be based on contributions. 

The purpose of the meeting, 
however, went beyond fundrais- 
ing. The audience was there to 
participate, to respond; in short, 
to become committed. The leaders 
attempted to create a fundamen- 
talist revival meeting; if we come 
forward, if we simply feel enough, 



we may fashion miracles. It is not, 
however, that easy. The meeting 
ended in frustration; the miracle 
did not happen. 

It did not happen for a number 
(;f reasons. First, the men and 
w:.men of NECCA are caught in a 
deeply-felt paradox. They would 
have a crusade, yet they harbor 
an abiding mistrust of their po- 
tential crusaders. The bleeding- 
heart-do-nothing-liberal putdown 
comes to them* as second nature. 
They have made a jump of faith, 
a radical commitment, and view 
anything less as cowardice. Like 
many true-believers, their intoler- 
ance is and integral part of their 
faith. Second, their assumption's 
are at best, partially correct. The 
gulf between sympathy and com- 
mitment js in all cases wide, and 
in many cases unbridgeable. For 
many in the audience, the desired 
end of dialogue was security rath- 
er than renewed conviction. The 
gap between those willing to un- 
dertake a total commitment and 
those who are unwilling or unable 
to do So may simply be too wide. 
At one point, Joan Lazar stated 
that "All the poor want from you 
is money. That is your role and 
your only role." For most of those 
present, that statement was true. 
The dominant product of the Fri- 
day meeting was frustration. For 
the time being, that is where the 
chain of evolution ends. 



the Major in Afro-American 
Studies. Last May the faculty ap- 
proved a series of recommenda- 
tions concerning Afro-American 
studies. Out of these recommen- 
dations was created a Commit- 
tee on Afro-American studies. 
In November this committee pre- 
sented a proposal to the faculty 
for a Major in Afro-American 
Studies. This proposal was dis- 
cussed at a joint meeting of the 
C.E.P. and the Committee on 
Afro-American Studies. The 
C.E.P. recommended that the 
faculty approve the proposal of 
the Committee on Afro-Ameri- 
can Studies for the creation of 
a Major in Afro-American 
studies. 

A major program consists of 
the major course (Afro-Ameri- 
can Studies 101) and ten course 
units, of which six must be His- 
tory 13, 14, and Afro-American 
Studies 5-6 and Afro-American 
Studies 7-8 (described below). 
The remaining four courses must 
be selected from a list of courses 
approved by the Committee on 
Afro-American Studies. 

Each student shall complete a 
minor planned with and approved 
by the Committee on Afro- 
American Studies, consisting of 
four units in one department or 
two semester units of each of 
two related departments. No 
course may be counted toward 
both the major and the minor. 

The administration of the ma- 
jor program will be under the 
supervision of the faculty mem- 
bers of the Committee on Afro- 
American Studies. Courses ap- 
proved for inclusion in the Afro- 
American Studies Major for 
1!(70-1».»71 (as of February 2, 
1!)70)* include: 

Afro-American Studies 201 
(Independent Study) 

Art 27 i 



Economics 10, 12 
Education 2 
English 22, 36 
Government 5, 21 
History 20, 21, 34 
Interdepartmental Course 1 
Sociology 6, 8 ^ 

w (*The list of approved courses 
will be modified as courses and 
course emphases change. As is 
the case for departments, the 
Committee on Afro-American 
Studies will have the power to 
determine the courses to be of- 
fered for the major. It is hoped 
that additional courses may be 
added to the approved list for 
enrolling majors this spring.) 

Seminar on Problems on Afro- 
American Life 

A study of psychological, so- 
cial, economic, and political 
forces which structure the ex- 
periences and life styles of Afro- 
American as individuals with 
membership in a distinctive sub- 
culture in the United States. This 
seminar will help the student to 
synthesize his previous course 
work and provide a significant 
research and bibliographic under- 
taking for him in the literature 
of Afro-American studies. (Pre- 
requisites: History 13, 14 and the 
approval of the Faculty mem- 
bers of the Committee on Afro- 
American Studies). 

Public Policy and Social 
Change Seminar 

A research seminar dealing 
with the critical problems of so- 
cial change as they relate to 
the Afro-American community. 
Objectives: public policy recom- 
mendations and sub-system mod- 
el building in-education, econom- 
ics, and politics. (Prerequisite: 
AA 5-6 and the approval of the 
Faculty members of the Com- 
mittee on Afrp-American 
Studies.) 




A Narrow Escape — The Orient, in all fairness, will not divulge the 
names of these women. We did, after all, go to considerable pains to 
tjft tin' information ourselves. We would not go so far as to discourage 
independent investigation, and after all, that's what Bowdoin's all 
about, isn't it? 

Junior Class Elects 
McClellan President 



Elections for the officers of the 
class of 1971 were held just prior 
to exams. Elected president, from 
a field cf six contenders, was John 
McClellan of Weymouth, Massa- 
chusetts. McClellan is a graduate 
of Weymouth High where he was 
class president and captained the 
crr.ss-country team. McClellan is 
president of the Beta house and 
starts at guard for the Bowdoin 
basketball team. He plans to at- 
tend medical school after gradua- 
tion. 

Elected vice-president was 
Richard Van Santvoort of Wil- 
liamstown, Massachusetts. Van 
Santvoort is a graduate of the 
Blake School in Minnesota where 
he played varsity hockey. He is a 
member cf the Deke house and is 
spending the spring semester at 
Mt. Hclyoke College on the ex- 
change program. 



Owen Larrabee of Lewiston was 
elected^secretary-treasurer to fill 
out the slate. Larrabee is a grad- 
uate cf Lewiston High where he 
was co-editor of the yearbook. He 
is a member of the Chi Psi house 
and assistant manager of WBOR, 
A Dean's List student, Larrabee 
plans to go on to Law School. 

The duties of the class officers 
are basically ceremonial. McClel- 
lan said that most of the work is 
done after graduation in regards 
to alumni activity. The secretary- 
treasurer has the job of keeping 
in touch with members, of the 
class after graduation. The class 
officers have no power and there- 
fore don't feel motivated to seek 
innovations. McClellan did say 
that he would like to see the rule 
in the Senior Center limiting 6 
members of one frat to a floor 
changed. 



PAGE FOUR 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1970 



BOWDOIN ORIENT Coeducation Plan Is Proposed 



Volume XCIX 



Friday, February 13, 1970 



Number 12 



~~~ Guest Column 

Editors, Orient 

I was in Brunswick S months ago and read several copies of the Ori- 
ent and was well impressed. 

Please consider the article enclosed. I ask no pay, only the glory of 
publication in the Orient. 

Keith Moore 

DUPED 

> by 

Keith Moore 

The Catcher in the Bye by Salinger should be whisked out of every 
classroom in America and be replaced at once with The Death of a Na- 
tion by John A. Stormer. I have just read the latter book, which has 
solidly confirmed my gravest suspicions. 

Why can't the citizens of America, the brightest nation in the world, 
see that since 1919 we have permitted ourselves, bit by bit, to fulfill 
the Communist plans for us? There are numerous categories on the 
Communist checklist for our destruction, but I wish to dwell on only 
two from the Stormer book: 

1. The Communists intend to dupe or receive our leaders. This has 
already proved itself true. With statesmen who don't care about the 
difference between a "win" or "no-win" war, with statesmen who smile 
and mollycoddle and wink at every sure-fire step of the Communists 
to destroy us — what can the poor followers do? Just what we're do- 
ing: sitting back idly in the phony comfort of high salaries, plenty of 
food and peachy homes and TV sets, doing and thinking nothing to- 
ward our protection, and being duped into acclaiming the intelligence 
of our leaders. These leaders are not intelligent! They have altered and 
perverted all the traditional American characteristics of self-defense, 
twisted everything around so that good becomes evil and evil good. 
The duped public is believing in them ! 

2. For this category, let me quote Stormer quoting Lenin of 1919: 
"Get them (the American children) away from God. Get them inter- 
ested in sex." How simply put! Anyone as young as forty has watched 
this drama occur right under his nose. You don't have to be very smart 
to look right or left in this country today to see that Sex is God. The 
other night at the store I saw three young men fatten the coffers of 
our business-oriented culture to the tune of three bucks — for their 
copy each of Playboy. I have maintained for ten years that this single 
magazine is one of the great tools of the Communists. I have listened 
to youthful conversations and I know what young men think about 
Playboy. In short, it is their god. Read it. It encourages on every page 
everything that the Bible does not. 

I know for sure that the Communists are winning their plan, which, 
by the way, is clicking right on schedule. It is because leaders (teach- 
ers, statesmen, ministers) are duped. It's like gettiing kicked in the 
groin and replying "Oh that's fine, I didn't feel a thing, do it again." 
There is another young-men's magazine dominant today which makes 
mockery of the United States Presidency and makes mockery of every 
institution on which the nation rests. I didn't say light satire, I said 
mockery. It is Esquire. Now let me say what really scares me : Readers 
will bristle and rush to write retorts to what I'm saying here, rush to 
retort in defense (in love) of Playboy and Esquire. These men (and 
some women) love a tool which is being used to destroy any future for 
their children. 

Stormer also shows that there have been Communist lies published 
in American textbooks since 1950. Some of these are in the form of 
anachronisms. There is one school text (junior-high level) which states 
that the UN won World War n and that the UN invaded the Normandy 
coast in June 1944. 1 want to know this: What kind of dishrag is being 
processed through our highly touted and very proud universities, being 
granted a degree and a job and a good salary — that stands in front 
of a classroom and teaches glibly that the UN invaded Normandy in 
June 1944 when the UN did not exist until April 1945? Where is that 
great intelligence that is supposed to accompany a degree and a job as 
a high-school teacher of America? 

Who is allowing these infarctions? Why hasn't someone risked his 
job and gone to the proper authorities about correcting these errors? 
I'm not dealing with trivia. Stormer makes it perfectly clear how the 
Communists use such errors as anachronism to achieve victory over 
our children's minds. Who is permitting such textbooks to be published 
and sold — sold — in our schools? We are paying to be destroyed! It 
isn't even free. 

All through the 1960s I was ridiculed severely for opining that the 
new sound — "rock" — all that — is a Communist tool. Of course it is. 
Why? Simple. Because this music (or "sound") is also a god among 
youth in America and England today. Smart of the Communists, wasn't 
it, to single out the two former world powers, the two powers that tra- 
ditionally risked everything for democratic government, and to inun- 
date and poison the youth of those two countries (above all others) 
with "rock," the Beatles, and all the atavism of this "sound." I have 
watched young people who were formerly, interested in the traditional 
symphonic music turn in short time to an addiction to "rock." It seems 
tacit enough that this addiction supplants any concern for the classics. 

(Plea** turn to page 7) 



Editor'. Note — Thu is • 
condensation of the plan for co- 
education submitted to the Gov- 
erning Boards last Friday. It 
was prepared by John Cole, 
President of Student Council, 
and Professor Edward Minuter 
of the Sociology Department. 
The plan, which was rejected, 
would have facilitated limited , 
coeducation at Bowdoin for the 
Fall, 1970, semester. 

This proposal attempts to anticipate problem areas and 
respond in a positive manner. The following is an out- 
line of the proposed plan: 

The General Plan 

The proposal would admit and register in September 
1970 sixty undergraduate women. The first group of 
sixty would be composed of approximately 40 freshmen 
women and 20 junior women transfers. The reasons for 
combining freshmen with transfers are: 

1. It will enable the College to spread the women over 
two classes thus causing as little overcrowding of classes 
as possible while maximizing the number of women ad- 
mitted. Since there is an increasing number of Bowdoin 
men who are taking the junior year away from the cam- 
pus, there will be space in advanced courses as well as 
for the introduction of women into major programs. 

2. At the end of the second year of the plan, the Col- 
lege will have gained the equivalent of four years aca- 
demic experience with women. By the end of the second 
year there will be the following class breakdown: 

Freshmen — 40 women 

Sophomores — 40 women with two years at Bowdoin 

Juniors — 20 women 

Seniors — 20 women with two years experience 
Consequently, 120 women will have been in all classes 
at Bowdoin, sixty of whom will have been here for two 
years. The College will be able to evaluate much more 
substantially the impact of women on a four year pro- 
gram in Bowdoin's unique atmosphere. The College can, 
with much harder individualized data, identify areas of 
concern with regard to women at Bowdoin in half the 
time. 

The first and second years of the plan will be essen- 
tially the same. The College will, then, have registered 
sixty women each year for a two year total of 120. Each 
year the College would register 40 freshmen and 20 junior 
transfers. . ' • 

The third year of the plan can follow basically two 
courses: 

1. Continuation of the first two years with the possible 
modification of the composition to 50 freshmen and 10 
transfers, or 

2. The registration of 130 women in whatever com- 
binations experience has suggested. At this point Bow- 
doin would be totally committed to coeducation. 

Admissions 

Bowdoin is a highly selective college with increasing 
visibility in the secondary schools of the nation. It ts an- 
ticipated that a special announcement of coeduca- 
tional opportunity at the College coming soon after the 
nationally publicized announcement of College Boards 
being voted an optional place in admission requirements 
would draw a large, qualified number of freshmen and 
transfer candidates. This would be true anytime before 
the traditional May 1st Candidates Reply Date subscribed 
to by most of our sister institutions. Ider.lly, any an- 
nouncement of Bowdoin's coeducational opportunities 
should be made no later than March 1, 1970. 

Transfer candidates from junior and community col- 
leges are increasingly available to all four year colleges 
with the explosive growth of the tivo year college. Fresh- 
men and others who would be candidates for Bowdoin 
admission have already made clear their interest to the 
Admissions Office in increasing numbers. In short, the 
admission of a good first class of women including girls 
from Maine, daughters of alumni and girls in other cate- 
gories should be relatively easy gwen Bowdoin's exciting 
academic climate. 

The Problem of Housing 

The addition of women over a two rear period will re- 
quire that 120 netv s/miccs become ax<ailable for under- 
graduate men. A plan for the academic years 1970-71 
and 1971-72 follows: 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 

Member of the United States Student Press Association 



Hu m JU 1970-71 



Editor 

Jar Swost 

Managing Baiter 

Fred ICaskk 

News Baiter 

David Gordon 

Sparta Baiter 

Brian Davis 



Basinets Manager 

Fred Langerman 

Advertising Manacer 

Peter Mejstrick 

Of ice Manacer 

Bob Armstrong 

Circaiattea Manager 

BUI Harpin 



EDITORIAL BOARD 
Jar Swost. Alan Bated, Brad Cnsick. parte Gordon, Modest Osadtsa, 



A. P. Daggett, J. 



Paal Batista. Joan Weiss. 

THE BOWDOIN PUBLISHING COMPANY 
P. Granger. Alan Baled. Jay Sweat. Fred Langerman. Be* Armstrong 



Published weakly whan claim are held during the Fall end Spring Semester by the 
students of Bowdoin College. Address editorial communications to the Editor and 
business and subscription communications to the Business Manager st the ORIENT. 
Moulton Union, Bowdoin College, Brunswick. Me. 04011. Represented for national 
advertising by the National Educational Advertising Service, Inc. Second class postage 
nasi at Brunswick, Me. 04011. The subscription rate is Ave (6) dollars for one year. 



The admission and registration of 60 women in the fall 
of 1970 depends largely on making suitable accommoda- 
tions available to house them. Our plan is to open a dor- 
mitory (housing 64) presently occupied fry men to incom- 
ing women for the academic year 1970-71. To d so will 
necessitate the disfHacement of roughly sixty (60) men 
from on-campus to off-campus housing. 

These places become readily available under the plan 
which follows, committing the college to a pluralistic, 
highly flexible pattern of undergraduate living sylcs for 
the future. The Coleman farm project, the laige number 
of undergraduates now living off-campus, and an increas- 
ing number of applications for off-campus homing, in- 
dicate that traditional on-campus accommodations arc 
declining in ftopularity for many students. This plan 
will not only supply this demand, but it trill also ex- 
pedite the assimilation of women into the Bowdoin com- 
munity. 



Phase 2: 1971-72 

Housing needs for the academic year 1971-72 would be 
met by continuing Phase I, by increasing the number of 
students living off-campus, and by the possible leasing of 
two floors (60 spaces approximately) in the Stowe House 
Motor Inn. This would allow another dormitory to be 
used to accommodate sixty (60) women. 

The Problem of Facilities 

The impact of sixty new women next year and an addi- 
tional sixty in 1971-72 would anticipate major problems 
arising in the use of Bowdoin's facilities. An examination 
of each of the critical areas, however, reveals that this 
increase will place few demands on the present plant and 
operation, and will also afford the college important ex- 
perience on which to project future needs in physical 
plant. Areas requiring possible attention are met as fol- 
lows: 

(1) Athletic Facilities: With only minor modification of 
the athletic plant, Bowdoin can offer nearly a full range 
of offerings to incoming women. Tennis, squash, badmin- 
ton, and swimming can all be enjoyed by women with 
little or no alteration of the gym or pool. Segregated 
lockers and showers can be provided at several different 
locations with minimal expense and modification. This 
is now done for certain faculty and townspeople under 
varying conditions and locations. Skiing, sailing, softball, 
and similar sports can be enjoyed using present college 
arrangements, and any new sport popular with girls, such 
as archery, can be easily introduced. 

(2) Library: The impact of sixty new students, accord- 
ing to the college librarian, would have no significant 
effect on the use of present library facilities, nor would 
120 new students be unmanageable. The library has al- 
ready begun to anticipate the pressures of a student body 
of 1200. 

()) Student Activity Space: As Bowdoin becomes a 
fully coeducational college, its women students will be 
assimilated into the wide variety of extracurricular ac- 
tivities now popular. The rooms -of the Moulton Union 
and other facilities can easily handle additional numbers 
as well as any new activity that women may wish to in- 
stitute. 

(4) Miscellaneous: With any increase -in students cer- 
tain minor, accompanying needs' in college facilities must 
be accommodated. New mailboxes, etc. can be provided 
easily and inexpensively and are not of major concern. 

Any additional expenses that time proves may be nec- 
essary for any of the above facilities can be met by the in- 
creased $57JOO in income that would be realized by ad- 
mitting 60 extra students. 

Curriculum: 

The impact of women on the curriculum can only be 
roughly estimated '.using data from Ttthe'rlctolh'pardble 
schools. The necessary qualitative data, however, is not 
hard enough to offer great validity in prediction. Con- 
sequently, we must assume that we can absorb 60 women 
without appreciable dislocation of any aspect of the 
College. This means that a clear statement that the Col- 
lege is undertaking this plan without additional expen- 
ditures must be forthcoming. 

The plan allows the maximum flexibility in curricular 
areas without increasing operational expenditures. 
Though the admission of forty freshmen women and 
twenty transfer women, the impact is. spread throughout 
the four year offerings. Bowdoin can then introduce a 
sizeable number of women to the College without lower- 
ing or in any way altering its traditionally high academic 
standards. 

What the increase ma, mean is that faculty are forced 
to re -evaluate departmental offerings, pedagogical meth- 
ods and class size. The College is now experimenting 
with new course offerings and programs and the advent 
of women can only help the College evaluate these pro- 
grams. 

The College must be candid with prospective women 
undergraduates in explaining the curricular offerings at 
' Bowdoin since there is no indication of change to accom- 
modate women. The College has traditionally had a fine 
curriculum and cannot afford other than frankness. 

—- — Overall Advantages of the Plan: 



Development opportunities and possibilities for the 
College can be enhanced through the addition of women. 
The benevolence of Bowdoin widows of the past will be 
supplemented by the added loyalty of Bowdoin women of 
the present. Coeducation should enable the College to 
tap sources of funds hitherto unavailable to the College. 
The plan also relates Finance and Development in rather 
obvious and healthy ways. The housing purchased for 
these students and paid for (indirectly) by them will have 
a capital appreciation factor and flexibility of an attrac- 
tive kind. The addition of sixty students while holding 
faculty and most other personnel situations at present 
levels also adds a new efficiency factor helping the College 
to operate on a more business like basis. 

The admission of sixty women undergraduates without 
additional operating expenditures allows the College to 
phase women in without disrupting any of the existing or 
planned College programs. In addition, it enables the 
College to enter into coeducation on a full scale with the 
necessary information. The increase in the area of actual 
experience with women on campus should help the Col 
lege to make decisions which would enable the flexibility 
necessary for exciting progress at Bowdoin. 

The final advantage to the proposed plan enables the 
College to buy two years time for adequate planning, 
fund raising and construction of living units and other 
facilities where necessary. With additional information 
in all areas the College can enter into new facilities with- 
out the encumherance of traditional myths concerning 
construction and uith the ability to take advantage ot 
exciting new possibilities in College construction. 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1970 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PACE FIVE 



Prudery Prevails 



Co-eds Barred From Infirmary 



by JOHN WEISS 

Bowdoin's nascent, if some- 
what limited, coeducational ven- 
tures have revealed how unpre- 
pared the school is for the fu- 
ture acceptance and assimilation 
of large numbers of women. 
Perhaps this unpreparedness 
isn't apparent to some of the 
faculty arid students at Bow- 
doin, but a significant number of 
highly placed members of the 
Bowdoin Community have dis- 
cerned (some aay created) criti- 
cal problems. One of the more 
salient problems involves medi- 
cal care of present and future 
Bowdoin women. 

The Dudley Goe Infirmary, 
with its staff of two-full time 
doctors and three nurses, has in 
the past proved adequate for the 
daily needs of Bowdoin students. 
Colds and athletic injuries com- 
prise the largest number of cases 
and as a result ten or fifteen 
beds usually remain empty. With 
the arrival of nine coeds first 
semester, problems quickly be- 
came evident; or, more accurate- 
ly, problems became evident to 
the Infirmary's staff. The Dudley 
Coe Infirmary was provided with 
one bathroom and toilet on each 



floor. In the eyes of the Infirm- 
ary staff this arrangement pre- 
cluded the admission of women 
patients on an overnight basis. 

One of the two doctors at the 
Infirmary, Dr. Anderson, stated 
his opinion on medical care for 
coeds. "If a girl is really sick 
and the Infirmary is empty then 
we would put her in here." When 
asked what would happen if only 
one bed were empty in the In- 
firmary and a coed requested en- 
trance, Dr. Anderson replied, 
"If the Infirmary is nearly full 
then she would be put in the lo- 
cal hospital or asked to stay at 
the house on Federal Street." 
Dr. Anderson admitted that "the 
local hospital is more expensive 
than staying in the Infirmary." 

_ One coed has already been 
denied entrance to the Infirm- 
ary because "the Infirmary was 
nearly full with influenza cases." 
Elizabeth Leighton, a coed from 
Mt. Holyoke, checked into the 
Infirmary one day before Christ- 
mas break with a temperature in 
the vicinity of 102 degrees. Be- 
cause of the "nearly full con- 
dition" of the Infirmary, she was 
asked to enter the local hospital. 



Miss Leighton is attending Mt. 
Holyoke this semester and was 
unavailable for comment. 

Dr. Hanley's views on the 

subject of medical care for Bow- 
doin coeds reveal the strong 
stand the Infirmary staff 'have 
taken on the issue. Dr. Hanley 
stated, "Depending on the num- 
ber and activity of the coeds to 
be admitted, an expanded infirm- 
ary with more doctors and a 
doubling of the nursing staff will 
be necessary. If three or four 
hundred girls are admitted I ex- 
pect a new Infirmary may have 
to be built." Dr. Hanley was 
definitely against the admission 
of women overnight unless "ab- 
solutely necessary." 

The obvious additional ex- 
pense and inconvenience to coeds 
of staying at the local hospital 
is lamentable, but for the present 
unavoidable. Hopefully a more 
satisfactory arrangement can be 
worked out in the future. It is 
interesting that a somewhat sim- 
ilar "logistical" problem in- 
volving the bathroom and toilet 
facilities in the dorms has been 
solved to most people's satisfac- 
tion. 



LETTERS TO 
THE EDITOR 



Pick One? 

20 January 1970 
Dear Editor, 

Certainly the fictitious article, which announced 
the appointment of Messrs. Epstein and Santagata 
to the Board of Overseers, cannot be considered. 
It was a-.deliberate canard which, quite obviously, 
fooled us all. 

Although the Orient is the 'voice of the college' 
in print, it certainly isn't the New York Times of 
collegiate publications! Although it may be sent to, 
and read by many persons, I doubt its impact (pick 
one) is substantial. I see no reason, therefore, for 
impounding last week's paper so that the appro- 
priate bowdlerizing could be performed. 

The Orient has more than enough room for an 
occasional lampoon, especially if something can be 
learned from it. To those who are reacting the 
most (and who were probably fooled the most), the 
lesson bears repeating: Don't believe all you read — 
fools. 

JOHN JOHNSON 

Survey Questioned 

Dear Editor: 

I am writing in response to an article published 
in last week's "Orient" that presented several fresh- 
men's impressions of Bowdoin, academic and other- 
wise. There were many points raised that I would 
have no trouble agreeing with, such as the necessity 
for coeducation and the "unhealthy attitude" that 
prevails toward women. But I would like to take 
issue first with some of the comments made about 
fraternities and second with the authors' conclusion 
that the freshmen "find fault with fraternities as 
they now exist." 

Mr. Jones was indirectly quoted as describing the 
fraternity atmosphere as "unnatural" to the extent 
that it "drives one to drink," and Mr. Gill stated 
that "there is no need for fraternities on campus." 
Considering that both men are, and presumably 
always have been, independents, I wonder with 
what authority or experience they deliver these 
strong indictments? On the basis of my experience, 
I have found the fraternity environment to be con- 
genial, open, and rewarding, with nothing "un- 
natural" about it. How can one who has never been 
part of the system unequivocally state that it is so 
unsatisfying that one must drink to compensate for 
whatever inadequacies exist? How can a non-fra- 
ternity member state that there is no need for fra- 
ternities when the high degree of interest in and 
enthusiasm for Bowdoin fraternities proves that 
there damn well is a need? Never having been an 
independent myself, I would not presume to pass 
such dogmatic judgements upon independent life as 
these on fraternity life. It seems to me that far 
more worthwhile comments on fraternities could 
have been solicited from fraternity members; ob- 
viously, the only person qualified to characterize 
fraternities would be one who had directly experi- 
enced the system and knew what he was talking 
about 

Accordingly, I see no validity in the authors' con- 
clusion that freshmen find fault in the present fra- 
ternity system. In the first place, the "survey" was 



fragmentary and not in the least representative, and 
the opinions of a few cannot be passed off as indica- 
tive of the rest. Further, only the independents of 
those interveiwed expressed discontent with frater- 
nities, and they are scarcely in any position to 
really be aware of whatever shortcomings exist. 
Those fraternity members interviewed expressed 
grievances with the curriculum, etc., but none had 
any complaints with fraternities. In short, the au- 
thors took the opinions of a few on a subject with 
which they are only tangentially familiar and at- 
tempted to present them as a comprehensive state- 
ment of opinion, and the conclusion they reached 
must be recognized as inaccurate and misleading. 

Sincerely, 
Steve Moriarty 
Delta Sigma '72 

Lots Looted 

Dear Editor: 

Vandalism and theft seem to be nightly occur- 
rences in the various parking lots in the college, 
much to the discontent of those whose cars have 
been subject to this destruction. Broken windows, 
stolen tape-decks, and ripped convertible tops are 
the main areas of concentration, resulting in hun- 
dreds of dollars of damage. It would appear to me 
"•that the $10.00 per year car registration that each 
owner pays ought to offer some form of security in 
addition to the snow-plowing service. I am led to 
believe that there is a form of security check on 
the buildings of the college performed by a campus 
police force, as evident by the sign "Bowdoin Col- 
lege Security" which appears on the door of a pick- 
up truck, but apparently these nocturnal wizards 
are oblivious to all but their time clocks. I certainly 
do not advocate a guard for each car, however I do 
believe that better measures could be taken to en- 
sure automotive safety from vandalism. Perhaps 
more lights in what few parking areas that exist 
would deter such harmful action; more cooperation 
with the Brunswick Police Force, or a full-time 
guard, with the title "Bowdoin College Night Park- 
ing Superintendent," might be useful in cutting 
down the crime rate. At any rate, unless some form 
of protection is found and used, the advantages of 
having a car will disappear among the broken glass, 
lost items, and other hazards of parking. 

Jeffrey E. Reichel '70 

Where Were You? 

An open letter to the students of Bowdoin College; 
January 15, 1970, marked the 41st anniversary 
of the birthday of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This 
day was proclaimed Martin Luther King Jr. Day in 
Maine, because a small men's college in Southern 
Maine opened the first Afro- American Center in the 
state and commemorated the day's activities to his 
memory. That college was Bowdoin. Did you know 
it? If so, where were you? Students have worked 
so hard for this day, and yet you didn't support 
them. The cries for more Black students" have been 
long and loud, but Wentworth Hall was not even 
filled. Only half of the people who attended the 
activities were Bowdoin students, and half of those 
were members of the Afro-American Society. Bow- 
doin has nine hundred students, but not even one 
hundred could show enough interest to support this 
day. January 15th was a day for humanity, not for 
color or race. Martin Luther King Jr. "had a 
dream." If that dream cannot be supported for one 
day on a campus the size of Bowdoin's, how are we 
ever to get out of the nightmare to make the dream 
reality? 

Sincerely, 
Fran Pinfold 
Wheaton College 



Survival Now 

by JED BURTT 

Ecology, new a respectable, grassroots movement, was once consic 
ered a radical ideology. Rachel Carson? Aldo Leopold? At best they 
were wilderness voices, at worst dangerous fanatics. Fanatics who 
challenged the assumed right to pollute the environment, to indiscrimi- 
nately apply chemical poisons, to make synthetic substitutions for 
natural foods, to eradicate "pests," to appropriate land for the military, 
for industry, for highways, for "progress." But what was more radical 
than all their don'ts was their belief that man was only one of many 
animal and plant species all cf which were interdependent and none of 
which, not even man, could survive in vacuo. Aldo Leopold and Rachel 
Carson and others like them placed ecological concepts squarely before 
man. We could ignore what they said, but we- could not escape its 
truth. 

As a science, ecology had its misty beginnings during the nine- 
teenth century. Thoreau wrote on January 1, 1858 in a letter to his 
ccusin, George Thatcher: 

Mr. Hoar is still in Conccrd, attending to Botany, Ecology, etc. 
with a view to make his future residence in foreign parts more 
truly profitable to him. 

Ecologists generally credit the German biologist Ernst Haeckel with 
first giving substance to the term in an essay published in 1870. 

Today ecology is a rapidly expanding, multidisciplihary field with 
far-reaching implications. 

Ecology concerns itself with the interrelationships of living or- 
ganisms, plant or animal, and their environments;, these are 
studied with a view to discovering the principles which govern 
the relationships. That such principles exist is a basic assump- 
tion — an act of faith — of the ecologist. His field of inquiry 
is no less wide than the totality of the living conditions of the 
plants and animals under observation, their systematic position, 
their reactions to the environment and to each other, and the 
physical and chemical nature of their inanimate surroundings. 

A. Macfadyen, 1957 
The single, most basic ecological concept, indeed the only unifying con- 
cept in this complex field, is that of an ecosystem. An ecosystem des- 
cribes the flow, accumulation and conversion of energy and matter 
through living organisms and their activities. Photosynthesis, decay, 
herbivory, predation, parasitism, and other symbiotic associations are 
the processes which ensure transport and storage of energy. Interac- 
tion between organisms provides for distribution of energy throughout 
the system. The sum of all these interactions may be likened to a 
pyramid, each individual focd chain or series of related interactions to 
a number of stones piled one on top of another, each stone touching 
many others, each stone one of many possible vertical arrangements. 

Forming the base of the pyramid are the plants. These convert ener- 
gy in the form of sunlight into organic material. The energy thus stored 
is released to insects and animals when they ingest the plant material. 
They in turn use the energy to form organic material (i.e. to grow new 
or replace old tissue) or to move about in which case energy is radiated 
from the animal in the form of heat. The herbivores, animals eating 
only plants, comprise the next higher level. Above the herbivores are 
the omnivores which feed on both plants and animals, above these the 
carnivores, the very apex of the pyramid being occupied by those large 
carnivores which feed almost exclusively on other carnivorous species. 
Thus each succeeding layer depends on the one below it for food and 
services and prcvidea the one above it with these same requirements. 
The pyramidal analogy is most appropriate in that the number of or- 
ganisms decreases from one level to the next. For every carnivore 
there are many prey animals and many more of their prey. There are 
staggering numbers of herbivcres and the plants upon which they feed 
and which are the base of this pyramid cover the surface of the earth, 
land and sea. The analogy is instructive as it emphasizes the depen- 
dence of each level of Ihe pyramid on those below; remove enough 
stones and the ordered structure becomes a pile of rubble. Finally, it is 
easy to see, thinking once more of the pyramid, how something, DDT 
perhaps, introduced at the lowest level is concentrated as it is passed 
from one level to another until a seemingly inocuous concentration 
has reached lethal proportions. 

The effect of most types of pollution is to prevent energy flow from 
one level to the next. Thermal pollution may have no effect on or even 
enhance the growth of ^algae in an estuary. But it might well make 
the habitat unsuitable for small fish, crabs, worms and other herbivo- 
rous species which feed on the algae. With the herbivores gone the 
carnivores also disappear and the algae, unchecked, increase to the 
point of strangling other forms of life. Ecological chaos is the end result. 
The same is true of air pollution, water pollution, and so on. Radical 
changes to the ecosystem brought on by pollution result in disruption 
of the energy flow. 

"Pest control" is a particularly interesting example of our lack of 
ecological understanding. The chlorinated hydrocarbons, DDT, Hepta- 
chlor, Aldrin, Dieldrin, and others, accumulate in nature. They do not 
break down. The original small, diluted concentrations of these chem- 
icals tend to build up in a food chain so as to end in a concentration that 
may be thousands of times as strong. These high concentrations occur 
not in the insects and other herbivores, the "pests," but in the carni- 
vores which help check the "pest" populations. A further consideration 
is the phenomenally high reproductive ability of insects. The likelihood 
of a resident strain of insect developing is excellent simply because of 
the vast number of genetic combinations occurring in a single genera- 
tion,. Birds, mammals, reptiles, the carnivores are not so fortunate. 
The sad fact is that it is the predators, not the "pests," which are de- 
stroying, and as the "pests" become resistant, as they already have in 
many cases, we can expect uncontrollable explosions in their popula- 
tions. 

Ecological methods of "pest control" could be sought and used. There 
are predatory species for every "pest" species. An understanding of 
ecology would help us in taking corrective measures toward avoiding 
pollution and cleaning up our environment. But more basic than 
science and corrective measures is the need for change in our concept 
of the land. Aldo Leopold speaks of this new and needed regard as the 
"Land Ethic." 

All ethics so far evolved rest upon a single premise: that the 
individual is a member of a community of interdependent parts. 
His instincts prompt him to compete for his place in that com,- 
munity, but his ethics prompt him also to co-operate. . . . The 
land ethic simply enlarges the boundaries of the community to 
include soils, waters, plants, and animals or collectively: the 
land. ... In short, a land ethic changes the role of Homo sapiens 
from conqueror of the land-community to plain member and 
citizen of it. It implies respect for his fellow members, and also 
respect for the community as such. 

Aldo Leopold, A Sand County Almanac 



PAGE SIX 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1970 




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Freshmen Are 
Seated On 
Council 

Elections were held last week 
for the tw6 freshman at-large 
positions on the Student Council. 
Chosen in the balloting, out of a 
field of fourteen, were Thomas 
Costin of Nahant, Massachusetts, 
and Mitchell Glazier of Worces- 
ter, Massachusetts. 

Costin, a graduate of Lynn 
English High School, is a stand- 
out on the freshman swimming 
team. Glazier, who went to high 
school in Worcester, was a half- 
back on the frosh soccer team. 
Both men are members of the 
Chi Psi house. 



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As if that weren't enough we're also going to have to come up with 
enough new equipment to provide telephone service to about 26 million 
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We need enough people (electrical, civil, mechanical and industrial 
engineers, designers, accountants and economists) to plan, design, build 
and operate a company that will be four times bigger than we are today. 
We also need engineers, researchers and scientists to develop electronic 
switching equipment, laser and other communications systems we'll be 
using 10, 25 and 50 years from now. 

But this is only one part of our communications business. 

Our Sylvania people, for example, are involved in other types of 
communications. Like color television sets, satellite tracking stations 
and educational television systems. 

Automatic Electric, Lenkurt, Ultronic Systems and some of our other 
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Six Seniors 
Are Elected 
To Phi Bete 



Professor Richard Morgan, 
Chairman of the Government 
Department, announced the elec- 
tion of six members of Bow- 
doin's Senior Class to Phi Beta 
Kappa, the national honorary 
fraternity. They are Paul Am- 
andio Batista, Neil Harris Ham- 
lin, Richard Paul Lampert, Dan- 
ial Allen Meade, William Michael 
Minihane, and Peter Clinton Wil- 
son.,. 

Selections of Juniors are made 
at the spring meeting of the so- 
ciety. 

Repeal Effort 
On McCarran 

WASHINGTON — (CPS) — 
Twenty-six senators and 127 rep- 
resentatives have jointly spon- 
sored a proposal to repeal title II 
of the Internal Security Act of 
1950 which allows law enforce- 
ment officials to "preventitively 
detain" individuals in the event of 
a presidential declaration of an 
"internal emergency" in the U.S. 

According to Sen. Daniel Inouye 
(D-Hawaii), it is necessary to re- 
peal, title U now, because "Wide- 
spread rumors have circulated 
throughout our nation that the 
federal government is readying 
concentration camps to be filled 
with those who hold unpopular 
views and beliefs." 
- The Internal Security Act of 
1950, also called the McCarran 
Act, gives the President the pow- 
er to declare an emergency if (1) 
the U.&'-were to be JnytklexL J2) 
if Congress" 'Were to declare war, 
or (3) if there was an insurrection 
in the U.S. in support of a foreign 
power. 

Title II provides for the deten- 
tion of a person "if there is rea- 
sonable ground to believe that 
such a person will engage in acts 
of sabotage or espionage." If a 
person is detained under title II, 
he has no right to a trial, either 
by judge or jury. 



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Feb. 9 
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Navy (Moulton Union) 
Feb. 11 
Federal Reserve Bank 

Boston 
Bedford (N.Y.) School De- 
partment 
Feb. 12 
Mercantile Stores 
Firemen's Fund Insurance 
Feb. 16 

Honeywell 
Feb. 17 
Great Northern Paper-Co. 
Connecticut Bank & Trust 
Norton Company 
Concord, N.H. Schools 
Feb. 18 
Star Market 
Equitable Life Ass. Co. 
Feb. 19 

National Shawmut Bank 
Feb. 20 
Dunn & Bradstreet 
Mobil Oil 

First National Bank of Bos- 
ton 
Feb. 24 
Telephone 

Brockton, Mass. SChool De- 
partment 
Feb. 25 
Northwestern Mutual 
Atlantic Richfield 
Feb. 26 
New England Mutual Insur- 
ance 
Paul Revere Life Insurance 
(L-4) 
Feb. 27 
Weston, Mass. School Dept. 

(9-2) 
University of ^Massachusetts 
MBA Program 



PAGE EIGHT 



A Student View 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY Vf, 1970 



Bag Requirement, Not "Cal" 



by BILL FINK 

Should the physical education 
requirement be "bagged" at 
Bowdoin? In attempting to con- 
structively answer this question, 
perhaps a more pertinent issue 
must be solved first; should a 
physical education program de- 
signed for college students be of 
a compulsory or a voluntary na- 
ture? 

Certainly, most Bowdoin stu- 
dents have been exposed at one 
time or another to extensive 
programs of physical training 
during their years in grade 
school, junior high, and high 
school. Undoubtedly, all of us can 
still recall fond memories of run- 
ning around a track, playing 
softball, touch football, and 
basketball, and of engaging in a 
wide variety of calisthentic ex- 
ercises during our high school 
years. In many cases, especially 
if you happened to be an out- 
standingly virile example of 
masculinity, "cal" class was of 
great benefit to you as you strove 
to get or stay "in shape." In 
many other instances, however," 
gym class was totally irrelevant 
and a waste of time. Yet, like it 
or not, you, as most of us did, 
went to "cal" class because it 
was required. 

Many other considerations 
have shaped our personal philos- 
ophies regarding physical edu- 



Cub B-Ball 



by R. B. CHAPPEL 

The Frosh basketball squad 
lost its first game' since it 
dropped this year's opener to 
U.N.H. The second loss was suf- 
fered at the hands of the Bates 
Wildcats, #i In an , attempt .to 
stretcli'.ttiheir 'winning streak to 
eight, the cubs were ahead, 43- 
41, at the end of an evenly 
matched and evenly played first 
half. The second half, however, 
resulted quite differently even 
though the cubs led by as many 
as nine points at various stages 
of the third and fourth periods. 
Gradually the Frosh wore out, 
allowing Bates to catch and pass 
their best efforts. The final score 
was a shaky but still dishearten- 
ing, 82-79. Bowdoin's high scor- 
ers in the contest were Lee Ar- 
ris and Dick Cartland turning in 
twenty points each. 

Only three days after semes- 
ter break, the team managed to 
put together a tremendous team 
effort against Morse High School 
of Bath. Both defense and of- 
fense worked effectively and ball 
handling in both cases was ex- 
cellent. Five Bowdoin players 
tallied into the double figures. 
The charge was led by Frank 
Campagnone with 21 points and 
Lee Arris with 16 points. The 
final score was a lopsided, 96-63. 

The next Frosh contest will 
be against U. Maine on Wednes- 
day. The Freshman team has a 
chance to turn in one of the fin- 
est records in a long time. Two 
of the remaining games are with 
Maine, so this next game is cru- 
cial. Also, another rival, Bates 
has one more chance to spoil the 
Frosh record. 



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cation. Perhaps you love to play 
football, baseball, or basketball. 
Perhaps you don't. Perhaps you 
love to participate in tennis, 
golf, or squash matches. Then 
again, perhaps you don't. Pos- 
sibly, your high school or prep 
school had excellent physical 
training facilities . . . maybe it 
did not. Was your high school 
ccach or instructor a "good guy" 
or wasn't he? In short, no mat- 
ter how you respond to any one 
of these statements, one factor 
is certain: Each of us has come 
away from the prolonged ex- 
perience of physical education 
with distinct attitudes and opin- 
ions. 

Thus, in view of the extensive 
orientation and training under- 
gone before entering Bowdoin 
and noting the current trend of 
eliminating superficial require- 
ments, a compulsory physical 
education program at the college 
level seems both authoritarian 
and simultaneously, ludicrous. 
This is not to imply that re- 
quired physical training is worth- 
primary and secondary 
schoor-actiyities it is vital in or- 
der to acquaint the student with 
the qualities inherent in hygiene, 
body building, an)d organized or 
"team" play. Yet, as mentioned, 
once a student has been exposed 
to and involved in such a pro- 
gram, the compulsory aspect of 



it would terminate. The fact that 
athletics is such a prime concern 
of every college's admissions 
policy tends to point to experi- 
ence in physical training. The 
college then must accept the fact 
that pursuing athletics is as 
much the choice of the student 
as the pursuit of a particular 
subject. After all, at the age of 
18 or 19, a person either cares 
about the condition of his "bod" 
or not. Also, he has probably es- 
timated his interest. in participa- 
tion in various sports. Of course, 
some students will work out or 
participate regularly while others 
will not. The general attitude 
and proficiency developed in the 
particular student will be the 
same, whether the "cal" attend- 
ance is required or not. 

As a student, this writer must 
hope that the Athletic Depart- 
ment at Bowdoin College adopts 
a policy of enthusiastically dis- 
playing and making available the 
facilities and personnel main- 
tained by the college. Also, the 
organizational element of the de- 
partment should be motivated 
towards developing the expressed 
interests of the students inter- 
ested in specific instruction com- 
petition. Many, not all, students 
will gladly take advantage of 
such an opportunity. Athletics 
and exercise would survive with- 
out compulsion. 



Polar Bearings 



HOCKEY 

Bowdoin 6 Vermont 5 

Bowdoin 4 Williams 2 

Bowdoin 4 Northeastern 3 

Bowdoin 2 U. Mass. 

Bowdoin 8 Amherit 2 

Bowdoin 4 Merrimack 3 

vs. Middlebury Friday 4 :00 

11-2 

Bowdoin Fr. 2 Salem St. 3 

Bowdoin Fr. 2 Andover 1 

Bowdoin Fr. 8 Colby 

vi. Bridgton Saturday 2:30 

SWIMMING 

Bowdoin SO Williams 44 

Bowdoin 44 Wealeyan 51 

vs. U. Connecticut Saturday 2:00 

4-2 

Bowdoin Fr. 60 Brunswick 35 

vs. Hebron Wednesday 

2-2-1 

Waterworks 

by FRED FOXX 

The Aquabears came out on 
top in a tense and exciting meet 
with Williams. Williams won the 
New England Championships last 
season. This, however, meant 
nothing to Bowdoin when the fi- 
nal freestyle relay was to be the 
deciding factor of the meet. Par- 
ker Barnes, who had won the 200 
yard freestyle earlier, managed 
to touch out the last leg of the 
relay. This gave Bowdoin a 
tenth of a second victory. The 
final score was 50-44. Also wor- 
thy of mention is Quinn and 
Robinson's sweep of the butter- 
fly event and Jeff Meehan's tre- 
mendous winning effort in the 
50 yard freestyle. Wendler and 
Progin also swept the diving 
event. 

Victory, however, was not the 
outcome of Bowdoin's attempt to 
halt Wesleyan's undefeated sea- 
son. Part of the Bears' problem 
was the difference in the struc- 
ture of Wesleyan and Bowdoin's 
pools. As a result, several events 
were lost because of poor turns. 
The final score was, nonetheless, 
a close 44-51. 

Saturday, the squad will com- 
pete against an always strong 
team from the University of 
Connecticut. 



BASKETBALL 

Bowdoin 82 Brandeis 94 

Bowdoin 75 Williams 74 

Bowdoin 63 Coast Guard 62 

Bowdoin 69 Middlebury 76 

Bowdoin 76 Bates. 74 

vs. Tufts Saturday 4:00 ' 

4-7 

Bowdoin Fr. 72 Colby 61 

Bowdoin Fr. 79 Bates 82 

vs. Maine Wednesday 5 :30 

^ 8-2 

WEIGHTLIFTING 

Third in Maine State Championship 

SHOWERTAKING 

Fred C. 1972 World 

1-0 

Thought For The Day: 

If you never apologize, 

keep yourself clean. 

Townies 
Drowned 

by BRIAN KENNEDY 

Local competitor, Brunswick 
High, swam against the Fresh- 
man Bears on Wednesday in the 
first Bowdoin meet since Janu- 
ary 14th. Picking up where they 
left off, a victory over both Deer- 
ing and Hebron, the squad posted 
an impressive 60-35 victory. The 
aqua cubs took an early seven 
point lead by winning the med- 
ley relay and never stopped to 
look back. The team won every 
event but two. Both Tom Costin 
and John Erikson captured two 
first places. Costin won the 100 
yard backstroke and the 200 
yard individual medley relay 
events. Erikson not only won, 
but set a new record in the 400 
yard freestyle turning in a time 
of 4:07.3. John also won the 50 
yard freestyle just ahead of 
teammate Kirk Abbot. Erikson 
has exhibited great versatility 
this year. He has dominated the 
long, middle, and short distances 
and also, substituted quite cred- 
itably for Rick Haudel in the 
greuling 200 yard butterfly 
event. Rick, who has been side- 
lined with a shoulder separation, 
picked up a first against Bruns- 
wick after being out of the wa- 
ter for more than a month. John 
Ward, Rick Lucas, and John 
Doran also captured winning 
points for the cubs on Wednes- 
day. The next meet for the 
Frosh is at Hebron on Wednes- 
day. Another victory is expected. 



Action Reviewed 

Skaters Still Hoopers Win 
"Unchecked" 



by HOSS 

During these last two >weeks, 
the Polar Bear hockey team has 
continued their winning ways. 
They still lead the Division II of 
the E.C.A.C. with a flawless 8-0 
record. 

Sid Watson's icemen traveled 
to the University of Massachu- 
setts last Friday and subsequent- 
ly defeated a strong U. Mass. 
team by a score of two to noth- 
ing. A highlight of the game 
was the second shut-out perfor- 
mance by Bowdoin's sophomore 
goalie, John Bradley. 

On the following day, Satur- 
day, the Bears traveled a few 
yards to Amherst in order to 
duel with Lord Jeff. The Am- 
herst club proved to be no match 
for the Bowdoin victory ma- 
chine. The Bears won handily 
8-2. The visitors dominated the 
entire game, restricting play al- 
most entirely to the Lord Jeffs' 
territory. Scoring honors went 
to Ed Good of the Bears who 
produced a "hat trick" . . . the 
first of the year for Bowdoin. 

The Bears concluded their lat- 
est road trip at Merrimack on 
Wednesday. In a contest that 
must be billed as the most excit- 
ing of the year, the Polarmen 
bested their hosts 4-3, but only 
in an overtime period. Jim 
Block, a' junior, scored the win- 
ning tally on a solo slap shot two 
minutes into the overtime per- 
iod. With this victory on the 
books, the Bears must now look 
to the action over Winter's 
against a highly rated Middle- 
bury squad. In the hopes that 
this column will not be read un- 
til after the game, a venture is 
made in saying that the Bears 
remain undefeated. - 



A Majority 

by PETER YAB 

After losing to Brandeis, 
despite Young's 17 points, the 
Varsity Basketeers managed to 
capture their third victory of the 
season by defeating the Williams 
College, the fourth period. The 
game had been extremely close 
and it was only in the last five 
seconds that Steve Carey sank 
two foul shots. The come from 
behind victory was clinched 
when Outhuse intercepted a long 
pass and eliminated the Ephs' 
hopes for one last shot. Miller 
led the Bear scoring barrage 
with 22 points. Carey followed 
with 14, Young with 13, and 
Theroux had 12. 

The Coast Guard Academy 
served as the squad's next vic- 
tim. The game was a battle, de- 
manding the utmost of each 
team. Winning by just one point, 
Russ Outhuse blocked a Guards- 
man's shot in the closing seconds 
of the overtime period to give 
Bowdoin a 63-62 victory. High 
scorer of the contest was Chip 
Miller accumulating 20 points. 

Although the Bears did not 
continue their campaign by de- 
feating Middlebury, the team 
did acquire another victory on 
Wednesday evening when Bates 
was hosted in the Morrell Gym- 
nasium. The contest was typical- 
ly close, 76-74. Again, a last 
period second effort by Steve 
Carey saved the day for the 
Bears. There were four scorers 
in double digits for the home 
team. The most notable of these 
was Clark Young who tallied 24 
points for the cause. 

Saturday, the Bears will host 
Tufts University. 



Salem Sneaks Past Frosh; 
Cubs Kick Colby's Ass 



by SPEEDY MEDERIOS 

The Salem State game was an 
unfortunate combination of bad 
luck and general uncoordination. 
Salem scored the first goal, but 
Bowdoin came back with two 
more by Bernie Quintan and 
Dick Donovan. For a while, it 
looked as if the Bowdoin team 
might pull through, but with 
only four minutes left in the 
second period, Salem's Bob Fitz- 
gerald scored, tying the game up. 
About two minutes into the over- 
time period, Salem's John Cronin 
get through the Bowdoin de- 
fense and just kept slapping the 
puck off Hutchinson's paddle un- 
til it went through, giving Salem 
the victory, 3-2. 

Jan. 10, the Frosh Icemen hit 
the road for an outing against 
Phillips Academy of Andover. 
Goals were scored for Bowdoin 
in the first period by Pete Flynn 
and by Skip Clarke in the sec- 
ond. While the teams were play- 



ing three-on-three, Andover's 
Cahill drove past the defense 
and shot one by Hutchinson for 
Andover's only goal. The game 
ended on that score of 2-1. 

The Colby game was an 8-0 
romp. Flynn, Donovan, and 
Quinlan each racked up two 
goals and two assists. John Taus- 
sig and Pete Bevins also came 
in for scoring honors, with as- 
sists by Clarke and Rick McPhee. 

The story of the game was 
puck control, as Bowdoin consis- 
tently controlled — and shot — 
the puck. The team of Quinlan, 
Donovan, Flynn scored six goals 
and proved to be just too much 
for the Colby defense. Bevins, 
especially, did a fine shooting 
job during the first period, driv- 
ing in again and again at the 
Colby goalee. Jeff Taylor played 
his first full game in the crease 
for Bowdoin, and did a fine job 
deflecting the shots that man- 
aged to get through the defen- 
sive line. 



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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13. 1970 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE SEVEN 



Duped . . . 



(Continued from page 4) 

And it is atavistic besides. And we are being duped, for people are cry- 
ing from everjf rooftop that this new "sound" is a very good, good 



thing! 



J 



Another area in which we are being duped by duped leaders is the 
university. The university has forfeited its traditional role and is new 
nothing but a trade school in a tuxedo. It hires for teachers not just 
some men of Communistic persuasion, but also p!ain American jces who 
are plain dumb. I have made a study cf teachers. A great swatch cf 
them in this country today, and since 1950, have been dull, glib, almost 
cloddy. They don't know their mother tongue correctly ncr present it 
correctly before their classes. They subscribe to — and they instill in 
their already jaundiced charges — every corrupt public sentiment on 
the market, every mediocrity. They are duped by every Communist 
lie, they believe in the two magazine-ceds mentioned above, and they 
teach poorly, boring their students. 

The university has also become a giant industry, a purely money- 
making organism. I saw a flimsy textbook last week of fewer than one 
hundred twenty pages. Price? Nearly twelve bucks! This isn't a racket? 
This isn't indirectly a tool of the Communists? Why are American 
youth disillusioned- unto- rioting on campuses today? Because the uni- 
versity has become a Frankenstein and a vampire. The American uni- 
versity robs a youth of his soul and his spirit, fleeces his every cent, 
and bores him to tears in the process. Many American professors^ and 
high-school teachers) are truly nothing but puppets and pawns in the 
bosom of Communistic plans to ccrrcde our children's minds. 

Who teaches? Well, I'm not going to mention all the family men, the 
devoted spinsters, and the plain honest hard workers. Why mention 
them? I'll tell you what's to mention: Teachers (and there are getting 
to be plenty of them now) who are divcrcees-turned-lesbians — bitter 
and pushy youngish frumps — a cancer and a disgrace on the Ameri- 
can educational scene, poisoning by example as well as precept. 
Teachers who are devout male homosexuals, showing off their wares 
— above the neck and below the belt — turning their classrooms into 
sideshows of narcissism. Don't kid me — I've made a study — our 
schools are loaded with homosexual teachers. In the Bay Area they 
abound. And Ames, Iowa, is not immune either. 

Every institution we are founded on is nearly ready to collapse in 
our laps. According to Stormer, it may take as little as twenty more 
years. I foresee forty. But they will be forty hellish years. Why? Be- 
cause we have asses in high places, leading us, teaching us, duping us 
into thinking good evil, evil good! Let me define my term: An "ass" is 
a man or a woman who places personal comfort and security over the 
common good, who reveres pub'.ic approval and social acceptance over 
and above the defense of his principles and the safety of his homeland. 

Why is this happening? Who is permitting it to happen? What are 
you doing about it? , 



Boards . . . 

(Continued from page 1) 

are taking about the same time 
as other schools have: a year to 
consider the idea of coeducation 
and another year to prepare defi- 
nite plans. 

John Cole is not entirely con- 
vinced. He believes the plan 
which he and Professor Minister 
constructed with the assistance 
of Professor Geary and Vice- 
Presidents Wolcott Hokanson and 
Joseph Jefferson suggests solu- 
tions to all the logistical prob- 
lems that would arise from the 
presence of sixty women on 
campus without committing the 
college to any definite future 
plans. This would give Bowdoin 
the advantage of one or two 
years of experience in coeduca- 
tion and also leave the school 
free to try any of the alterna- 
tive permanent plans that might 
be adopted. The year's experi- 
ence could well reveal problems 
that might otherwise be unanti- 
cipated or might show that sup- 
posed problems did not actually 
exist. Cole sees no conflict be- 
tween the desire to have limited 
coeducation immediately and the 
desire to plan as intelligent a 
proposal for permanent arrange- 
ments as is possible. 

Cole argues that immediate ac- 
ceptance of women would bring 
about $50,000 added income and 
would increase Bowdoin's devel- 
opment potential fantastically. 
It would also keep Bowdoin in 
the news after the elimination of 
SATs. He thinks a change to co- 
education in a few years would 
go unnoticed. 

The Trustees accepted the 
resignations of William Ireland 
and Earle Thompson. Overseers 
William Drake and Winthrop 
Walker were appointed to re- 
place them. Sanford Cousins re- 
places Ireland as Vice-President 
of the Trustees and Vincent 
Welch replaces Drake as Vice- 
President of the Overseers. Five 
vacancies on the Board of Over- 
seers will be filled in June. 



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Heavy! False Start 

J by SIR WALTER 



by RICK SPILL 

The Lisbon High School Gym- 
nasium on Sunday was the scene 
of one of the largest and cer- 
tainly the most exciting State, of 
Maine Weightlifting Champion- 
ships ever held. Twelve state 
lifting records fell as well as the 
record for the most points ever 
scored by a winning team. The- 
perennial champion, Lisbon Bar- 
bell Club, copped the laurels 
again by accumulating 39 points 
and having five of the eight in- 
dividual winners. The Princeton 
Barbell Club just edged past the 
Brunswick squad to capture sec- 
ond place, scoring eight points 
to ;he latter's seven. The out- 
standing performance of the day 
was turned in by Mike King of 
Lisbon who, while weighing 158 
pounds, pressed 260, snatched 
220, and clean and jerked 310. 
King, who set five state teenage 
and senior records, was named 
Maine's lifter of the year. 

Three Bowdoin men were the 
only competitors for the Bruns- 
wick Barbell Club. Bob Good- 
man, a freshman from Fort 
Lauderdale, Florida, garnered 
the "top spot in the 148 pound 
. class. Roy Bouchard tied for 
second place in the 132 pound 
class, but was awarded third be- 
cause he was heavier than his 
rival. Senior Rick Spill took 
third in the 181 pound class. 
Like Bouchard, he had also tied 
for second honors but was the 
heavier of the competitors. 

The Bowdoin Weightlifting 
Club will grunt back into action 
again in March with a power- 
lifting meet against the Maine 
Maritime Academy. 



for WAMO New. 



The varsity track team has 
been plagued this year by both 
sickness and injury. Bill Lever 
and Mark Cuneo are just two of 
the trackmen whose absences 
have been felt by the team. This 
year's Bears have lost their first 
three dual meets, last year's 
squad went undefeated. The two 
latest losses were not only dis- 
turbing but indicative of the lack 
of depth from which the team 
suffers. Before the exam break, 
on January 17th, the Bears tra- 
veled to Boston to run against 
a much improved M.I.T. club. Al- 
though, Bowdoin took several 
firstB, the Engineers came away 
the victors. For the visitors, Fon- 
ville and McQuater swept the 40 
yard dash and Sabe captured top 
honors in the long jump. In gen- 
eral, however ,the Bears had a 
poor day, coming no where near 
their potential. The final score 
was 70 to 34. The latest dual 
meet for the track team was at 
home against Vermont on Satur- 
day. While the outcome was 
. close, the Bears still, did not ap- 
proach their capacity. Fonville 
won the 40 yard dash, John Rob- 
erts took the pole vault, and 
"King" Ken Cuneo was first in 
the mile. The Bears hope to sal- 
vage the record by beating Colby 
en Saturday. 



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THE 




BOWDOIN ORIENT 



VOLUME XCIX 



The Oldest Continuously-Published College Weekly in the United States 
BOWDOIN COLLEGE, BRUNSWICK, MAINE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20. 1970 



NUMBER 13 






Big Brother? 



Seniors Initiated Into Phi Bete; 
PDP-10 Knows It All Bowdoin's Weil Gives Address 



Bowdoin College has installed a 
new computer, capable of com- 
pleting In less than one day all 
the calculations done on its pre- 
vious computer during the past 
five years. The half -million-dollar 
PDP-10 general purpose compu- 
ter, manufactured by Digital 
Equipment Corp., Maynard, Mass., 
is the largest single equipment in- 
vestment in the 175-year history 
of Maine's oldest college. The 
PDP-10 will be able to accommo- 
date up to 63 users and make each 
one feel that he alone is using the 
entire system since there is no 
appreciable time lag between the 
time the full program is entered 
and the results begin to be re- 
ceived. Bowdoin's previous com- 
puter could accommodate only 
one user at a time. 

Myron W. Curtis, Director of 
the Bowdoin Computing Center, 
said five terminals are now in 
operation on the Bowdoin campus. 
In the fall, several area colleges 
and secondary schools are ex- 
pected to ha've terminals con- 

Anthony To 
Speak On 
Draft Laws 

Cushman D. Anthony will 
speak on the topic, "You and the 
Draft," next Thursday in Went- 
worth Hall at 7:30 in the eve- 
ning. Dr. Anthony graduated 
Juris Doctor cum laude from 
Michigan Law School and is cur- 
rently the Director of the Stu- 
dent Practice Program and Lec- 
turer at the University of Maine 
School of Law. He served in the 
United States Navy in the early 
sixties. 

This lecture is being sponsored 
by the Brunswick-Bath Citizens 
Committee on Selective Service. 
This organization is composed of 
Bowdoin professors, a local 
clergyman, doctor, lawyer and 
other citizenry. At present they 
offer private draft counseling 
services. 

In an interview, Professor 
Coursen, a member of the com- 
mittee, explained the purpose of 
the . lecture and the committee. 
He stressed the point that 
knowledge of the law is essen- 
tial. ' He said that the Selective 
Service regulations are confus- 
ing and often purposely so and 
that a better knowledge of these 
regulations would enable every- 
one to make the most of his mil- 
itary obligation. Coursen, how- 
ever, emphasized that the com- 
mittee was not anti-military. He 
noted that a sizeable portion of 
the members had been in the 
service during the major con- 
flicts. There are some Vietnam 
War veterans, among them a 
Purple Heart and a Bronze Star. 

Dr. Anthony will hold a ques- 
tion and answer period at the 
end of the lecture which he hopes 
will serve to aid individuals with 
personal problems concerning 
the draft. 



nected to the Bowdoin computer. 
Other schools and organizations in 
the State are welcome to use the 
facility. Schools involved in the 
time-sharing system will pay fees 
on the basis of time used, plus 
telephone line and terminal ren- 
tal charges. At the same time 
that it is serving time-sharing 
users the PDP-10 is capable of 
performing batch processing jobs 
that do not require operator in- 
tervention, and of being used in 
experiments requiring immediate, 
or real-time, data collection and 
responses. Under real-time oper- 
ations, data can be acquired at 
random intervals from laboratory 
experiments, stored in the com- 
puter, and responses received in a 
fraction of a second. 

Professor Ivan J. Hyams of the 
Bowdoin Chemistry Department 
tried out a program on the Col- 
lege's old computer, which was 
designed over ten years ago, and 
the new PDP-10. The Central 
Processor Unit (CPU) time re- 
quired to perform the necessary 
calculations was 15 hours on the 
old computer and only 48 seconds 
on the PDP-10. In most cases it 
takes longer to introduce a pro- 
gram and data into the computer 
than it does for the machine to 
perform the relevant calculations. 
In recommending purchase of the 
PDP-10, the Computing Center 
Committee of the Bowdoin Facul- 
ty suggested that because such a 
system is capable of serving the 
computer needs of a large number 
of external users, the new com- 
( Please turn to page 6) 



by FRED CUSICK 

In the old days (1837) when 
Harvard was just beginning to ef- 
fect the changeover from Calvin- 
ism to Unitarianism and Bowdoin 
was still little more than a cow 
pasture, Ralph Waldo Emerson 
gave his famous Phi Beta Kappa 
Address at Harvard on 'The 
American Scholar." Among the 
evils which Emerson warned 
against was that kind of scholar- 
ship which feeds upon itself, the 
scholars who annotate the works 
of scholars who have edited the 
works of scholars who may per- 
haps have studied the works of 
some great literary figure. Emer- 
son cried out for an end to this 
kind of academic cannabalism. 

Lota of Change* 

Phi Beta Kappa addresses have 
changed a lot since Emerson's 
time. They've gotten worse, but 
the American scholar, that noble 
savage, has flourished. Two dis- 
tinguished American scholars, 
/Professor Jack Hexter of Yale and 
I Dr. Gordon Weil '58 of the Twen- 
tieth Century Fund, have given 
the Phi Beta Kappa addresses at 
the College this year. Professor 
Hexter' s address was poorly re- 
ceived. One Bowdoin professor 
called it "trite as hell." Dr. Weil, 
however, who spoke last Tuesday 
night, gave a smooth if not very 
penetrating lecture on the subject 
"Europa, or How to Get Carried 
Away By a Lot of Bull." 

Myths about Europe • 

Dr. Weil was concerned with 
analyzing the prevailing myths 



that Americans cherish about 
Europe. The first and greatest 
myth which he attempted to re- 
fute was that in the light of Viet- 
nam, the Black Revolution, the 
Generation Gap, Spiro Agnew, and 
other problems, Europe is no lon- 
ger important for Americans. He 
disagreed with this idea strongly. 

European Quality 

He pointed out that although 
"Europe is not part of the prob- 
lem it may well be part of the so- 
lution" at a time when Americans 
are becoming increasingly dissa- 
tisfied with their own Coca-Cola 
culture. Europeans, he said, have 
managed to preserve more quality 
in their lives even if they have 
fallen behind in the economic race 
with the United States. In fact, 
he took a rather ambivalant atti- 
tude toward European economic 
growth. He seemed to think that 
the Europeans .could never catch 
up with the United States in Re- 
search and Development related 
fields, but that if they stuck to 
those things which they could do 
well (One is tempted to say "na- 
tive industries." ) they might make 
a significant contribution. The 
Dutch, it seems, are far ahead of 
everybody else in the development 
of peaceful nuclear energy and 
the British have invented the 
hovercraft. British hovercraft, or 
French hovertrains, appeared in 
his address whenever Dr. Weil 
wished to emphasize the possibili- 
ty of European economic indepen- 
dence, but, despite their valiant 
efforts and ceaseless hovering, 



Afro- Am Presents Statement; 
Faculty Meets Late Thursday 



by JAY SWEET 

RESOLVED: That with respect to the role of 
Bowdoin College in meeting the educational needs 
of the disadvantaged black population, it is the in- 
tent of the Governing Boards that the College shall 
make an honest and sincere effort to increase the 
enrollment of qualified black students at the College 
to a reasonably representative number. This is to be 
accomplished within a period consistent with 'the 
realities of identifying and attracting such black 
students to the College as can derive significant 
benefits for themselves and contribute to the educa- 
tional processes of the College. This purpose must 
also be accomplished within the limitations of cur- 
rent and projected financial resources. It is the 
feeling of the Governing Boards that the guidelines 
which have been suggested through the Office of the 
President of the College can be accepted as a goal 
toward which to work in implementing the spirit 
of this resolution. Further, it is an explicit intent 
of this resolution to restate that Bowdoin's admis- 
sion program shall in no way involve the application 
of the concept of a fixed quota with respect to any 
applicant or applicants for admission. 

Statement of the Trustees 

The students were especially anxious to increase 
the number of black, especially black disadvan- 
taged, students. They suggested 85 as a reasonable 
figure for the total number of black students in the 
College That seemed not unreasonable. They 
asked for the fall of 1970 as a goal for the achieve- 
ment of that number. While pointing out the diffi- 
culties involved, we felt that that date could well 
be accepted as a goal. 

The Goal 



The Governing Boards of the College have spoken 
to the first of these points. In a resolution passed 
at their mid-winter meeting last February and pub- 
lished immediately afterwards, they stated that it 
was their intent that the College should make an 
honest and sincere effort to Increase the enrollment 
of qualified Black students at the College to a rea- 
sonably representative number. I think that the 
composition of this year's freshman class repre- 
sents, for that class, a reasonable realization of that, 
wish. It is the College's intention that what is true 
of the current freshman class should be true of 
succeeding freshman classes, so that it becomes true 
of the College as a whole. In all honesty, we are 
several years short of the realization of this goal for 
the College as a whole. But the change has begun 
and the commitment is there and it is genuine and 
heart-felt. 

From Howell's Martin Luther King Day Address 

Whereat, the college Made a commitm«it to admit 

SS black students by Fall, 1*70, and 
Wkertat, we consular tko miou for act meeting 
the commitment inadequate: 
We, the members of tko Bowdoin Afro-Ameri- 
can Society demand that the college meet Hs 
commitment of a minimum of U black stu- 
dent. by thi. Fall. 

Afro-American Society 



American Research and Develop- 
ment seemed to prevail. 

Foreign Policy Myths 

Dr. Weil also discussed the 
myths on which we had based 
twenty-five years of foreign policy 
following the war. First, we at- 
tempted to stop the "European 
civil war" which had raged for 
centuries. Second, we wanted all' 
war powers pooled under one mili- 
tary command. Third, we wanted 
all the nations of Europe political- 
ly united in some kind of federal 
arrangement. Fourth, we desired 
economic unity for Europe. Dr. 
Weil pointed out that each of 
these four desires was partially 
fulfilled. The "civil war" was 
stopped. The armed forces of 
Western Europe were united in 
NATO. Their was some political 
unity and of course the Common 
Market made for a great deal of 
economic unity. Of the four 
myths which we had pursued the 
third, that of political unification, 
was the furthest from being rea- 
lized. Dr. Weil, however, did not 
rule it out. In fact, he said is as 
one of the five courses which Eur- 
ope might follow in the future. As 
Weil sees it (he may be creating 
his own myths) Europe can: 1. 
Remain largely as it is with a 
group of partly unified countries 
pulled in different directions by 
nationalism. 2. Become a conti- 
nent of strongly nationalistic na- 
tions, except for Germany, the 
Gaullist ideal. 3. Form a federal 
alliance dominated by America. 4. 
Form a federal alliance hostile to 
America. 5. Form alliances among 
nations only, for special purposes. 

Federal Europe 
There was a sixth course which 
Dr. Weil was careful not to In- 
clude among the possible. This is 
the course that he would like to 
see Europe take. He would like to 
see a federal Europe, neither pro 
nor anti-American which could 
counterbalance the growing 
American cultural domination in 

(Please turn to page S) 



The above statement was delivered to Hawthorne- 
Longfellow Hall by a group of thirty-three Black 
students at approximately lunchtime on Wednesday. 
At that time, President Howell, the Deans, and Di- 
(Pleaee tars to page 8) 



WAIVER! 

At a meeting late Thursday 
evening, the faculty approved 
a waiver of the Pentagonal 
role limiting postseason play 
for Bowdoin'. 1989-70 hockey 
team. The faculty vote was 
■ear unanimous. 

Viae Pre.ide.t of tho Col- 
lege Woleott Hokaasoa, who 
negotiated the waiver, ex- 
plained that it applies only to 
this year** hockey team. It- 
will permit the Boars, cur- 
rently undefeated in ECAC 
Division) 11 play, to attend any 
poe t se a son tournament to 
which they are invited. Al- 
though the waiver does not 
apply to any ether Bowdoin 
teams, Mr. Hokanson ex- 
plained that the Pentagonal 
agreement will bo reviewed 
this year. 

The team played last night 
at the University of New 
Hampshire. Coach Watson 
and his players were there- 
fore unavailable for 





PAGE TWO 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1970 



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STUDENT 
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by SAUL GREENFIELD 



In Student Council this week 
the proposal of a self-scheduled 
exam period was discussed by 
Dean Greason. He expressed a 
willingness to look into the possi- 
bility of such a system being im- 
plemented at Bowdoin. How- 
ever, Dean Greason questioned 
the practical effect of such a sys- 
tem in reference to cheating on 
exams. This system would allow 
the student to schedule the exam 
at his convenience. John Phillips, 
the originator of the proposal be- 
lieves that the present Honor 
System has built in clauses that 
could handle this loose exam sys- 
tem effectively. Dean Greason 
then mentioned that students 
couldn't help talking about an 
exam after taking it and this 
would cause problems. One stu- 
dent then replied, "I don't see 
why we have to Honor Code at 
all if it isn't going to be applied 
under these circumstances." The 
debate ended in a proposal to set 
up a committee to investigate the 
system and to look into its oper- 
ation at Haverford and Smith, 
where it has been implemented. 

Two letters from President 
Howeil were read. The first dis- 
closed his wish to have two stu- 
dents sit in on the June meetings 
of the Board of Trustees and 
three to sit in on the meetings of 
the Board of Overseers. They 
can participate fully in debate 
but cannot vote. The second let- 
ter confirmed Bowdoin's en- 
dorsement of a holiday commem- 
orating Martin Luther King, Jr. 

A discussion then followed in 
regard to this fall's rushing pro- 
cedure. A proposal was read by 
Dave Campbell, president of 
Sigma Nu, favoring the small 
houses in an effort to save them. 
The proposed system would have 
freshmen rotate in groups of 
twenty among the fraternity din- 
ing rooms in a two week rush 
period. Either all houses would 
be restricted to seventeen new 
members or just the stronger 
houses would be subject to such 
a limitation. This proposal will 
be discussed further in open com- 
mittee meetings. 



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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1970 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



PAGE THREE 



Weekend Planned For 
Minority Subfreshmen_ 



by JOHN WEISS 

Bowdoin's traditional sub- 
freshman weekend was eliminat- 
ed by Director of Admissions 
Richard Moll at the end of the 
1968-69 academic year. The con- 
fusion and inebriation accom- 
panying each sub-freshman 
weekend was considered to be at 
best useless, and at worse harm- 
ful, to Bowdoin's admissions ef- 
forts. It was decided that in- 
undating the campus with 200 to 
250 subfreshmen, only a fifth of 
whom would be accepted, cre- 
ated an artificial atmosphere : the 
subfreshmen weren't seeing the 
'real' Bowdoin. The en masse 
pilgrimage to the Pines is over. 
But, in its place, on March 13 and 
14, the Office of Admissions will 
introduce a new, perhaps more 
fruitful, subfreshman weekend. 

The weekend of March 13 and 
14, Portuguese, Indian, and Black 
Americans will journey from as 
far away as Savannah, Georgia 
to see Bowdoin and get an idea 
of what Bowdoin offers its stu- 
dents. Admissions Assistant 
Bobbie Ives '69 indicated that 
the Office of Admissions planned 
the weekend for two reasons. 
"Most of these people have yet 
to see a college campus, much 
less Bowdoin. Most of the 
Blacks are from metropolitan 
areas. We're bringing them 
here to give them an idea of 
what a small rural college is 
like, and, also, simply to sell 
them on Bowdoin College. 



Cancelled 

UPI 

Colby College announced to- 
night that "The Band", the 
musical group that was to 
have opened the college's win- 
ter carnival weekend tomor- 
row night will not be able to 
appear. 

. A college spokesman said 
the college was notified today 
that one member of the group 
had contracted a viral infec- 
tion, forcing the group to can- 
cel its scheduled 9 p.m. con- 
cert in the Colby gymnasium. 

A spokesman for the stu- 
dent government which con- 
tracted "The Band" said 
money sold for tickets in ad- 
vance will be refunded. An 
attempt will be made to re- 
schedule the concert in the 
spring. 

Some four thousand ' per- 
sons were expected to attend 
the concert. 



I asked Mr. Ives if these per- 
spective freshmen were paying 
their own way and, if not, how 
the weekend was being financed. 
"Originally, it was BUCRO's re- 
sponsibility to recruit black stu- 
dents. In the past few years, 
BUCRO's responsibilities as well 
as its funds have been taken 
over by the Afro-American So- 
ciety. Part of the money to bring 
these students here is coming 
from the Afro-American Socie- 
ty's funds, and part from a spe- 
cial funds of the Administration. 
All transportation and meals will 
be paid by the college." 

Although the schedule of 
events for the weekend is incom- 
plete, an agenda is beginning to 
materialize. The subfreshmen 
will arrive between 10:00 a.m. 
and 3:00 p.m. on Friday, March 
13. Dinner will be held Friday 
night in the Terrace Under the 
Union for members of the Afro- 
American Society and all their 
guests. After dinner there will 
be a faculty reception at the 
Afro-American Center. Satur- 
day night, the approximately 40 
guests will be invited to attend 
the Mahalia Jackson concert giv- 
en in the gym. 

Bobbie Ives suggested that the 
Admissions Office was apprehen- 
sive about "possible bad reper- 
cussions" from the weekend. 
"This is the first year we have- 
n't had a regular subfreshman 
weekend, and we hope people 
won't get uptight about having 
only members of minority groups 
up for a weekend." 

The subfreshmen will be 
lodged in fraternities, dorms, 
and hopefully the Senior Center. 



V 





The Persistence Of Vision 

by MARK HEINLEIN 



Weil 



(Continued from Page One) 

Europe. Finally Dr. Weil argued 
for some kind of definite Ameri- 
can foreign policy towards Eur- 
ope. He characterized our present 
one as "floundering" and prone to 
outbursts of petulance. 

Polite Reception 

Dr. Weil's address was politely 
received by an audience which 
was composed largely of old and 
f new members of Bowdoin's chap- 
iter of Phi Beta Kappa. Some 
members of the audience, how- 
ever, regreted that he had treated 
the topic in such a general way 
and that there was nothing new 
in his conclusions. Dr. Weil, to 
some degree at least, seems to 
have continued the cannabalistic 
tradition in American scholarship. 



"The Persistence of Vision," a traveling 
exhibition now visiting the Walker Art Mu- 
seum, provides us with an opportunity to see 
the changes in visual attitudes and picture- 
making in examples from the recent work of 
five contempory American photographers. 
The exhibition should not be considered in 
terms of the conventional conception of 
photography as an image taken and present- 
ed directly from nature. The changes re- 
flected here indicate a need to understand 
the limitations of the medium and to investi- 
gate its possible extensions. A shift has 
taken place, new directions are beginning to 
appear and these steps toward them are only 
the first. The new position allows for a 
series of interesting frays to unite and 
clarify the experience of human vision and 
expression through photography. 

The primary ccnsiderations of the exhibi- 
tion appear to be an expansion of the visual 
vocabulary and its adaptation to expressive 
purposes — my reactions to it are condi- 
tioned by my awareness of the photograph- 
er's picture-making concerns within the con- 



text of my own experience. I found the 
products of the Gill-Blumberg collaboration 
to be very disappointing. Their efforts 
seem vague and indecisive, as if they are 
simply manipulations of photographic ele- 
ments and images. The situation improves 
with the work done by Heinecken and Wood, 
who have""freen able to achieve a certain sty- 
listic and thematic consistency within their 
new and separate directions. Uelsmann is 
the most advanced and disciplined member 
of the group. His imaginative photographs 
combine single elements drawn from nature 
assembled in unnatural arrangements. These 
usual visionary and interpretative rela- 
tionships, put together by technical innova- 
tions, are visually stimulating but probably 
limited as a vehicle of expression since the 
tendency of the observer is to become more 
involved with the appearance of the photo- 
graph rather than its content. 

The photographs of the exhibition are im- 
portant for their individual failings and suc- 
cesses and should prove interesting to both 
serious anu casual observers. The show may 
be seen from February 13th to March 15th 
at the Walker Art Museum. 



NECCA Worker 



Brunswick Is Home Of Activist 



by DAVE GORDON 

When the teach-in on poverty, 
organized by the New England 
Conference for Community Ac- 
tion, was held here two weeks 
ago, one of the main speakers 
was a Brunswick resident, Joan 
Lazar. What brought Joan La- 
zar to Brunswick and what she 
intends to accomplish here is 
what I sought to find out. 

A year ago, Joan Lazar was a 
Ph.D. candidate in statistical 




At Ifeft, Alvin Lee of Ten Yean After getting it on. Alvln, a dark horse candidate for Winters Queen, lost by 
a landslide to the lady on the right. Never ones to tamper with tradition, we wholeheartedly applaud the 
judges' decision. Winters Queen Di&nne Rodgers of Endicott Junior College was escorted by Bob Hall, out- 
standing hockey defensemaa. Is it not truly written that the best defense is a strong offense? 



thermodynamics at Yale Univer- 
sity. Originally from New York 
City, Joan was the only female 
in her. graduating class at Brook- 
lyn Polytechnic Institute. "I 
loved science and felt sure that I 
wanted to get my Ph.D." Later, 
Joan said, "I realized I was going 
into science as an escape. I 
thought that I was disgusting. 
Later on, I got interested in peo- 
ple. I think that many Bowdoin 
students are into the same type 
thing." 

While Joan felt "sophisticated 
in abstract politics," she did not 
involve, herself in political ac- 
tivity while she was at school. 
She saw student radicals as 
"young and enthusiastic," but 
not totally relevant. Joan isn't 
exactly sure why she decided to 
leave Yale. "Why did everybody 
else leave?" 

I asked Joan what she felt was 
wrong with the present structure 
of society. "It makes people feel 
like shit. If a person's poor, so- 
ciety makes them think it's their 
own fault." Joan considers her- 
self to be involved in politics 
from a psychological point of 
view. "We have to make people 
feel that they're worth some- 
thing." 

Joan first came to Brunswick 
last summer, when she worked 
for the American Friends Service 
Committee as a researcher on the 
the federal food assistance proj- 
ect. She presently lives on Mc- 
Keen Street next to the TD 
house with a fluctuating group 
of about six other people, rang- 
ing in ages from about seventeen 
to their mid-twenties. 

I asked Joan about the New 
England Conference for Com- 
munity Action (NECCA). "It's 
a coalition of some active groups 



in various areas. We're all in- 
volved in various ftfrms "of 
change. All low-income. In 
New Haven, where the group's 
the strongest, they run their own 
health center, run some courses 
in the high school, and have 
forced changes in A.D.C. (Aid 
to Dependent Children). Fred 
Harris is their leader." 

N.E.C.C.A. was formed last 
August out of a conference on 
poverty called by the American 
Friends Service Committee and 
held in New Hampshire. Most of 
the people involved in the begin- 
ning were poor people, both 
black and white. The primary 
focus of N.E.C.C.A. is to educate 
grass-roots organizers. "We're 
looking for people who are ready 
to stand up and fight back. If 
they could gain political sophisti- 
cation, real changes could be 
made." 

Training sessions are being 
held to train people to fill the 
need for those organizers. "The 
training sessions deal with fear. 
People talk about • personal ex- 
periences and in that way break 
the psychological grip the rich 
have on them. People tend to be 
racist towards themselves. By 
meeting other successful low-in- 
come groups these feelings are 
combatted." 

So far, black people in 
NECCA have been mos^t success- 
ful and have done much of the 
teaching of white people, a fac- 
tor which has forced the whites 
to challenge their own racism. 

Despite the work she is doing, 
Joan Lazar is not optimistic 
about the future. "The only 
way people can win out against 
poverty is by uniting. People 
are kept apart in too many ways. 
■rate page 4) 



PA< 



THE BOWDOIN ORIENT 



BOWDOIN ORIENT 



Volume XCIX 



Friday, February 20, 1970 



Number IS 



<r 



Referendum and The Boards - 

The cursory discussion and subsequent rejection of the Cole- 
Minister proposal raises serious questions about the mood of the 
Boards concerning the entire issue of coeducation. The proposal 
was not read by most members of the Boards beforehand, nor 
was it ever formally introduced in session. Apparently, it was 
rejected on the strength of a single letter from the Director of 
Admissions which, without explanation, claimed that implemen- 
tation of the plan was impossible in the allotted time. 

We do not claim to possess the expertise necessary to ade- 
quately evaluate the proposal and its implications. It seems 
clear, however, that the plan was never seriously discussed ; that 
the members of the Boards simply had no inclination to consider 
the admission of women to Bowdoin in Fall, 1970. 

The students of this College are overwhelmingly in favor of 
coeducation as soon as possible. The Governing Boards do not 
seem to feel that this fact is of any great importance. They 
have, however, approved the addition of up to six students to 
their number. 

These students will speak for the entire student body. Their 
impact should be greatest upon issues like coeducation where a 
clear dichotomy exists between student and Board perspec- 
tives. It is imperative, therefore, that the students be as fully 
representative as possible of student opinion. For this reason, 
they should be selected by referendum. Time should be allowed 
for candidates to speak publicly and candidly to the issues that 
confront the College. Space in the Orient will be provided 
any candidate who wishes to utilize it. The role of the Student 
Council is one of administration rather than selection; it should 
set the requirements for candidacy and administer the election. 
Only by this means may a truly representative student voice be 
heard on the Governing Boards. 

Campus Attention Turns 
Toward Environment 

WASHINGTON — (CPS) — The predominant theme of campus 
conferences, conventions, dialogues and teach-ins is shifting from 
"campus unrest" to "the environmental crisis." 

The shift does not indicate the solution of the problems that still 
put students at odds with administrators, regents and politicians as 
much as it indicates the discovery that no students, administrators, or 
politicians will remain to tangle if America denatures itself out of 
existence. 

The largest nationwide effort planned so far is the "Environ- 
mental Teach-In" originated by Sen. Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.) for 
April 22. The teach-in is being coordinated by law, medical and 
other professional school students here. 

The plan is for students on individual campuses to develop their 
own programs for studying, exchanging ideas, and initiating action 
on environmental problems, particularly those facing their own com- 
munity. Like the Vietnam Moratorium, the teach-in is a national 
idea developed on the local level. 

At some California campuses there already are more than half- 
a-dozen environmental action organizations. For several years, stu- 
dents in the San Francisco Bay area have been aware of their natural 
environment as they have fought to save the Redwoods and to stop 
the filling of San Francisco Bay. Southern California students like- 
wise have had to deal with oil pollution of the Pacific around Santa 
Barbara and Los Angeles' smog. 

Currently, California ecology crusaders are planning a 500-mile 
walk from Sacramento to Los Angeles to exhibit models of ecologic- 
ally sound life-styles. Two-hundred walkers